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Jessica
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About the Book & Author

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Photo: A Christmas Carol

Generations of readers have been enchanted by Dickens’s A Christmas Carol -- the most cheerful ghost story ever written, and the unforgettable tale of Ebenezer Scrooge’s moral regeneration.

Written in just a few weeks, A Christmas Carol famously recounts the plight of Bob Cratchit, whose family finds joy even in poverty, and the transformation of his miserly boss Scrooge as he is visited by the ghosts of Christmas past, present, and future.

From Scrooge’s “Bah!” and “Humbug!” to Tiny Tim’s “God bless us every one!” A Christmas Carol shines with warmth, decency, kindness, humility, and the value of the holidays. But beneath its sentimental surface, A Christmas Carol offers another of Dickens’s sharply critical portraits of a brutal society, and an inspiring celebration of the possibility of spiritual, psychological, and social change.

This volume collects Dickens’s three most renowned “Christmas Books,” including The Chimes, a New Year’s tale, and The Cricket on the Hearth, whose eponymous creature remains silent during sorrow and chirps amid happiness.

About Charles Dickens: Dickens is probably the greatest novelist England ever produced. His innate comic genius and shrewd depictions of Victorian life -- along with his memorable characters -- have made him beloved by readers the world over. In Dickens' books live some of the most repugnant villains in literature, as well as some of the most likeable (and unlikely) heroes. Meet the Writer.

Discover all titles and editions from Charles Dickens.

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smudgecat
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Re: About the Book & Author

As we look deep in to the meaning of this book My greatest wonder is when did scrooge change.

Marley scared him but he basically ignored that after it was over.

The visits from the spirits he believed to be dreams or nightmares.

Was his own death the turning point. (It would be for me!)

I believe Mr. Dickens brings us a truer history of the harsh times when most working class people had poor working condition, low wages, and poor living condition.
Dicken's Scrooge truly reads more like a history book then a story
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BarbaraN
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Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author


smudgecat wrote:
As we look deep in to the meaning of this book My greatest wonder is when did scrooge change.

Marley scared him but he basically ignored that after it was over.

The visits from the spirits he believed to be dreams or nightmares.

Was his own death the turning point. (It would be for me!)

I believe Mr. Dickens brings us a truer history of the harsh times when most working class people had poor working condition, low wages, and poor living condition.
Dicken's Scrooge truly reads more like a history book then a story




I agree with you, smudgecat. I have not read this yet but my feeling is that it is more than just a nice traditional Christmas story--Dickens would have more of a point to make. I hope, when we get into the discussions, we can talk more about some of the deeper messages than just "feel good" story about a mean, miserly old man who discovers the meaning of Christmas. That is why I ordered the annotated version.
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Choisya
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Re: About the Book & Author

Before he became a novelist, Dickens was a journalist and a Hansard Reporter at the House of Commons. In his journalism he concentrated on exposing the vile living conditions he saw around him in London and at the House of Commons he tried to influence Members of Parliament. However, he met with little success and so decided to expose these things in novels, which, of course, he did with great success. Most of his novels expose some aspect of British life which needed social reform and many charitable societies were set up in his lifetime, quite a few of which are around today. He also went to America and caused quite a stir there too!:smileyhappy: (See his Notes from America, some of which he incorporated into Martin Chuzzlewit.)




BarbaraN wrote:

smudgecat wrote:
As we look deep in to the meaning of this book My greatest wonder is when did scrooge change.

Marley scared him but he basically ignored that after it was over.

The visits from the spirits he believed to be dreams or nightmares.

Was his own death the turning point. (It would be for me!)

I believe Mr. Dickens brings us a truer history of the harsh times when most working class people had poor working condition, low wages, and poor living condition.
Dicken's Scrooge truly reads more like a history book then a story




I agree with you, smudgecat. I have not read this yet but my feeling is that it is more than just a nice traditional Christmas story--Dickens would have more of a point to make. I hope, when we get into the discussions, we can talk more about some of the deeper messages than just "feel good" story about a mean, miserly old man who discovers the meaning of Christmas. That is why I ordered the annotated version.


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BarbaraN
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Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

It is Christmas already! I just received the Annotated version and it is a beautiful book. It is wide format in two columns, hard covered, full of historic illustrations and some in color. And of course all sorts of fascinating facts. Because of its wide, two column format, it is comparable to a 400 page book. The story text and information are kind of printed side-by-side except there is a lot more commentary. The first three paragraphs of Stave 1 constitute one column followed by seven columns of annotation or four actual book pages! The book also includes the four stave version, a short form prepared by Dickens for public reading with lots of notes on that. If you are an annual reader, you might want to get yourself an early Christmas present.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780393051...

I also got my Jim Dale audio and one of my movies. I'm ready!
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ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

BarbaraN--I also have the Annotated edition and agree with you about its quality. I'm looking forward to reading the notes. I'm still envious about the Jim Dale audiobook. Let me know what you think of it, especially if you'd recommend it.

~ConnieK



BarbaraN wrote:
It is Christmas already! I just received the Annotated version and it is a beautiful book. It is wide format in two columns, hard covered, full of historic illustrations and some in color. And of course all sorts of fascinating facts. Because of its wide, two column format, it is comparable to a 400 page book. The story text and information are kind of printed side-by-side except there is a lot more commentary. The first three paragraphs of Stave 1 constitute one column followed by seven columns of annotation or four actual book pages! The book also includes the four stave version, a short form prepared by Dickens for public reading with lots of notes on that. If you are an annual reader, you might want to get yourself an early Christmas present.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780393051...

I also got my Jim Dale audio and one of my movies. I'm ready!


~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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jwhip
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Registered: ‎12-08-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author

I agree, with most of the literature written at that time, each writer was attempting to expose an aspect of society that most of the upper classes ignored. This was brought to the masses through accessible literature, with a moral tale behind it.
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: About the Book & Author

Welcome to the book club, jwhip!

~ConnieK



jwhip wrote:
I agree, with most of the literature written at that time, each writer was attempting to expose an aspect of society that most of the upper classes ignored. This was brought to the masses through accessible literature, with a moral tale behind it.


~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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JesseBC
Posts: 278
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

Just me...doing what I always do and dropping in when I finally get a chance to read the book, weeks after the discussion, to see if anybody's still around. (I just can't keep up with this forum!) At least A Christmas Carol is easily read in one sitting!

So, silly question, but...on almost every board in the forum, someone makes one of these posts raving about the Barnes and Noble edition of the book, always with a fair amount of complimentary detail, and including a link to purchase their edition.

Does B&N ask you to do this or something? (At least ask for pay!)

I'm kidding...mostly...sort of...

I don't suggest we start a thread about how the forum is company marketing. I suspect it would be pulled down so fast our heads would spin. I just have been noticing this and thought it was odd. Occasionally, someone will post about a special edition of the book they particularly like, but it usually doesn't sound quite so consistently like a sales pitch.





BarbaraN wrote:
It is Christmas already! I just received the Annotated version and it is a beautiful book. It is wide format in two columns, hard covered, full of historic illustrations and some in color. And of course all sorts of fascinating facts. Because of its wide, two column format, it is comparable to a 400 page book. The story text and information are kind of printed side-by-side except there is a lot more commentary. The first three paragraphs of Stave 1 constitute one column followed by seven columns of annotation or four actual book pages! The book also includes the four stave version, a short form prepared by Dickens for public reading with lots of notes on that. If you are an annual reader, you might want to get yourself an early Christmas present.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780393051...

I also got my Jim Dale audio and one of my movies. I'm ready!


Author
ConnieAnnKirk
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Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

Not sure what you mean, JesseBC--It seems natural to me that B&N.com would tie book discussions of classics to their own classics editions. This is their forum, after all! That said, the link on each book page is provided for convenience, and any edition is fine for readers to use for discussion in the book clubs!

~ConnieK



JesseBC wrote:
Just me...doing what I always do and dropping in when I finally get a chance to read the book, weeks after the discussion, to see if anybody's still around. (I just can't keep up with this forum!) At least A Christmas Carol is easily read in one sitting!

So, silly question, but...on almost every board in the forum, someone makes one of these posts raving about the Barnes and Noble edition of the book, always with a fair amount of complimentary detail, and including a link to purchase their edition.

Does B&N ask you to do this or something? (At least ask for pay!)

I'm kidding...mostly...sort of...

I don't suggest we start a thread about how the forum is company marketing. I suspect it would be pulled down so fast our heads would spin. I just have been noticing this and thought it was odd. Occasionally, someone will post about a special edition of the book they particularly like, but it usually doesn't sound quite so consistently like a sales pitch.





BarbaraN wrote:
It is Christmas already! I just received the Annotated version and it is a beautiful book. It is wide format in two columns, hard covered, full of historic illustrations and some in color. And of course all sorts of fascinating facts. Because of its wide, two column format, it is comparable to a 400 page book. The story text and information are kind of printed side-by-side except there is a lot more commentary. The first three paragraphs of Stave 1 constitute one column followed by seven columns of annotation or four actual book pages! The book also includes the four stave version, a short form prepared by Dickens for public reading with lots of notes on that. If you are an annual reader, you might want to get yourself an early Christmas present.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780393051...

I also got my Jim Dale audio and one of my movies. I'm ready!





~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Frequent Contributor
JesseBC
Posts: 278
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

Well, sure, and I'm not surprised to see those links on the main forum pages or in the opening comments from administrators.

But I'm talking about when the ostensibly average participant comes in and starts extolling the virtues of the B&N edition, complete with a link to purchase it. Which happens in almost every discussion that would reasonably have a B&N edition.

It just struck me as kind of weird.

Now that companies are relying more and more on "viral marketing," one never can tell anymore what's legitimate praise from a happy customer and what's just a company-drafted sales pitch given to an average person to recite.





ConnieK wrote:
Not sure what you mean, JesseBC--It seems natural to me that B&N.com would tie book discussions of classics to their own classics editions. This is their forum, after all! That said, the link on each book page is provided for convenience, and any edition is fine for readers to use for discussion in the book clubs!

~ConnieK



JesseBC wrote:
Just me...doing what I always do and dropping in when I finally get a chance to read the book, weeks after the discussion, to see if anybody's still around. (I just can't keep up with this forum!) At least A Christmas Carol is easily read in one sitting!

So, silly question, but...on almost every board in the forum, someone makes one of these posts raving about the Barnes and Noble edition of the book, always with a fair amount of complimentary detail, and including a link to purchase their edition.

Does B&N ask you to do this or something? (At least ask for pay!)

I'm kidding...mostly...sort of...

I don't suggest we start a thread about how the forum is company marketing. I suspect it would be pulled down so fast our heads would spin. I just have been noticing this and thought it was odd. Occasionally, someone will post about a special edition of the book they particularly like, but it usually doesn't sound quite so consistently like a sales pitch.





BarbaraN wrote:
It is Christmas already! I just received the Annotated version and it is a beautiful book. It is wide format in two columns, hard covered, full of historic illustrations and some in color. And of course all sorts of fascinating facts. Because of its wide, two column format, it is comparable to a 400 page book. The story text and information are kind of printed side-by-side except there is a lot more commentary. The first three paragraphs of Stave 1 constitute one column followed by seven columns of annotation or four actual book pages! The book also includes the four stave version, a short form prepared by Dickens for public reading with lots of notes on that. If you are an annual reader, you might want to get yourself an early Christmas present.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780393051...

I also got my Jim Dale audio and one of my movies. I'm ready!








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BarbaraN
Posts: 519
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

I am the one who made the original posting and if you click on the link I cited, you will see it is not a link to a B&N Classical Edition at all but a rather special Annotated Edition. I merely put in the post because I thought it was special. Personally I find it annoying when people recommend a book and then don't tell specifically what it is and where to find it. I do usually check these recommendations out but the buying choice, of course, is mine. It is just a sharing of information. The only thing I do in deference to B&N is not give the link to another competing online source. After all they pay for the board.

The best way to police these things is to check out the poster. If they look like a regular participant, then they are probably not deliberately promoting B&N. B&N promotions are obvious--they are put up by a clearly marked ADMIN of MOD. If you skim through the Christmas Carol board looking for the little rubber duck you will see my postings. You might start with the movies. Actually, B&N Editions are usually bargain priced. If I were B&N I would be promoting more expensive and profitable books.



JesseBC wrote:
Well, sure, and I'm not surprised to see those links on the main forum pages or in the opening comments from administrators.

But I'm talking about when the ostensibly average participant comes in and starts extolling the virtues of the B&N edition, complete with a link to purchase it. Which happens in almost every discussion that would reasonably have a B&N edition.

It just struck me as kind of weird.

Now that companies are relying more and more on "viral marketing," one never can tell anymore what's legitimate praise from a happy customer and what's just a company-drafted sales pitch given to an average person to recite.





ConnieK wrote:
Not sure what you mean, JesseBC--It seems natural to me that B&N.com would tie book discussions of classics to their own classics editions. This is their forum, after all! That said, the link on each book page is provided for convenience, and any edition is fine for readers to use for discussion in the book clubs!

~ConnieK



JesseBC wrote:
Just me...doing what I always do and dropping in when I finally get a chance to read the book, weeks after the discussion, to see if anybody's still around. (I just can't keep up with this forum!) At least A Christmas Carol is easily read in one sitting!

So, silly question, but...on almost every board in the forum, someone makes one of these posts raving about the Barnes and Noble edition of the book, always with a fair amount of complimentary detail, and including a link to purchase their edition.

Does B&N ask you to do this or something? (At least ask for pay!)

I'm kidding...mostly...sort of...

I don't suggest we start a thread about how the forum is company marketing. I suspect it would be pulled down so fast our heads would spin. I just have been noticing this and thought it was odd. Occasionally, someone will post about a special edition of the book they particularly like, but it usually doesn't sound quite so consistently like a sales pitch.





BarbaraN wrote:
It is Christmas already! I just received the Annotated version and it is a beautiful book. It is wide format in two columns, hard covered, full of historic illustrations and some in color. And of course all sorts of fascinating facts. Because of its wide, two column format, it is comparable to a 400 page book. The story text and information are kind of printed side-by-side except there is a lot more commentary. The first three paragraphs of Stave 1 constitute one column followed by seven columns of annotation or four actual book pages! The book also includes the four stave version, a short form prepared by Dickens for public reading with lots of notes on that. If you are an annual reader, you might want to get yourself an early Christmas present.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&bnit=H&bnrefer=BROWSE&EAN=9780393051...

I also got my Jim Dale audio and one of my movies. I'm ready!










Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

[ Edited ]
Well, I suppose it's technically possible for a B&N employee (which I'm not, btw) to pose as a regular reader and then promote some book in a post. I have to say, though, that I've never seen any evidence of that in my time on the B&N online book clubs. I was going to mention, but BarbaraN already did, that the book she suggested in this club was the Annotated CC, which is not a B&N edition. You might be responding to the interest and skill that some club members have for recommending books/editions they like. I know if I find a book I really like, I usually want to let people know. An online book club is just a natural extension of that desire, I think; a natural place to recommend books to other members. Some participants may simply sound like professionals in their recommendations because they write with such enthusiasm and inform so completely.

~ConnieK



JesseBC wrote, in part:
Well, sure, and I'm not surprised to see those links on the main forum pages or in the opening comments from administrators.

But I'm talking about when the ostensibly average participant comes in and starts extolling the virtues of the B&N edition, complete with a link to purchase it. Which happens in almost every discussion that would reasonably have a B&N edition.

It just struck me as kind of weird.

Now that companies are relying more and more on "viral marketing," one never can tell anymore what's legitimate praise from a happy customer and what's just a company-drafted sales pitch given to an average person to recite>







Message Edited by ConnieK on 01-14-2008 05:05 PM
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Frequent Contributor
JesseBC
Posts: 278
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author: Annotated Christmas Carol

Please allow me to clarify (before admin starts circling my account) that I wasn't accusing anybody of anything, let alone suggesting anybody was assuming a false identity.

Besides, that's not what viral marketing is. Viral marketing involves companies soliciting customers (or trial market participants) to tell their friends and associates about a particular product or company. They usually aren't compensated for this, so it amounts to giving the company in question thousands (or, in some cases, millions) of dollars worth of free advertising (hence, my apparently rather poorly-executed attempt at humor).

So, whenever I hear someone talking excitedly about a specific brand name or telling me the exact company from which I can buy this great product, I naturally wonder if it's viral marketing -- since that's what viral marketing is.

Viral marketers are everywhere and few people are even aware of them, which is one reason it's so successful -- the idea being that customers respond more readily to advertising if it comes from an acquaintance rather than from the company itself. (Of course, it doesn't hurt that it's free either.)

I just thought it was odd, that's all.

I wasn't accusing anybody of anything.





ConnieK wrote:
Well, I suppose it's technically possible for a B&N employee (which I'm not, btw) to pose as a regular reader and then promote some book in a post. I have to say, though, that I've never seen any evidence of that in my time on the B&N online book clubs. I was going to mention, but BarbaraN already did, that the book she suggested in this club was the Annotated CC, which is not a B&N edition. You might be responding to the interest and skill that some club members have for recommending books/editions they like. I know if I find a book I really like, I usually want to let people know. An online book club is just a natural extension of that desire, I think; a natural place to recommend books to other members. Some participants may simply sound like professionals in their recommendations because they write with such enthusiasm and inform so completely.

~ConnieK



JesseBC wrote, in part:
Well, sure, and I'm not surprised to see those links on the main forum pages or in the opening comments from administrators.

But I'm talking about when the ostensibly average participant comes in and starts extolling the virtues of the B&N edition, complete with a link to purchase it. Which happens in almost every discussion that would reasonably have a B&N edition.

It just struck me as kind of weird.

Now that companies are relying more and more on "viral marketing," one never can tell anymore what's legitimate praise from a happy customer and what's just a company-drafted sales pitch given to an average person to recite>







Message Edited by ConnieK on 01-14-2008 05:05 PM


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