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BarbaraN
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Trivia

[ Edited ]
I thought it might be fun to have a thread to miscellaneous information found it the book, especially things that might not be familiar to those of us on the "other side of the Pond."

Message Edited by BarbaraN on 11-26-2007 10:52 AM
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BarbaraN
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding

The Christmas Pudding served for dessert at the Cratchets is something that I am not familiar with and even my Annotated Christmas Carol doesn't explain it. In the movie I'm watching it was round and dark and there was a great ceremony and anticipation in Bob Cratchet tasting it before it being served to the family. In the book it says:

---------------
Mrs. Cratchet left the room alone--to take the pudding up, and bring it in.

Suppose it should not be done enough! Suppose it should break in turning out!....

Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper....In half a minute Mrs. Cratchet entered: flushed, but smiling proudly: with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.

Oh, a wonderful pudding! Bob Cratchet said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs. Cratchet since their marriage.
---------------------

Is anyone familiar with this dessert and why it is so difficult to make and serve? With all the ceremony attached to this scene, I would imagine it has some special significance also.

Barbara
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Peppermill
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding

Barbara -- Here's a recipe for Plum Pudding (no plums) or also called Christmas Pudding from Harrod's, the London department store known for its fine foods section (among other departments):
http://www.recipeland.com/recipe/11200/

It should give you a sense of why Plum Pudding has the culinary reputation it does.

Much easier, if you think you would like to try one, is to find one on your grocery shelves, heat, and serve with a bandied hard sauce (basically confectioners' or powdered sugar with butter and flavoring). If you don't like fruit cake, you probably wouldn't enjoy plum pudding. But if you do, its worth considering. I have made it (a different recipe); I usually buy ours; and I don't serve it every year, although we certainly enjoy it.

BarbaraN wrote:
The Christmas Pudding served for dessert at the Cratchets is something that I am not familiar with and even my Annotated Christmas Carol doesn't explain it. In the movie I'm watching it was round and dark and there was a great ceremony and anticipation in Bob Cratchet tasting it before it being served to the family. In the book it says:

---------------
Mrs. Cratchet left the room alone--to take the pudding up, and bring it in.

Suppose it should not be done enough! Suppose it should break in turning out!....

Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper....In half a minute Mrs. Cratchet entered: flushed, but smiling proudly: with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.

Oh, a wonderful pudding! Bob Cratchet said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs. Cratchet since their marriage.
---------------------

Is anyone familiar with this dessert and why it is so difficult to make and serve? With all the ceremony attached to this scene, I would imagine it has some special significance also.

Barbara

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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BarbaraN
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding


Peppermill wrote:
Barbara -- Here's a recipe for Plum Pudding (no plums) or also called Christmas Pudding from Harrod's, the London department store known for its fine foods section (among other departments):
http://www.recipeland.com/recipe/11200/

It should give you a sense of why Plum Pudding has the culinary reputation it does.

Much easier, if you think you would like to try one, is to find one on your grocery shelves, heat, and serve with a bandied hard sauce (basically confectioners' or powdered sugar with butter and flavoring). If you don't like fruit cake, you probably wouldn't enjoy plum pudding. But if you do, its worth considering. I have made it (a different recipe); I usually buy ours; and I don't serve it every year, although we certainly enjoy it.

BarbaraN wrote:
The Christmas Pudding served for dessert at the Cratchets is something that I am not familiar with and even my Annotated Christmas Carol doesn't explain it. In the movie I'm watching it was round and dark and there was a great ceremony and anticipation in Bob Cratchet tasting it before it being served to the family. In the book it says:

---------------
Mrs. Cratchet left the room alone--to take the pudding up, and bring it in.

Suppose it should not be done enough! Suppose it should break in turning out!....

Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper....In half a minute Mrs. Cratchet entered: flushed, but smiling proudly: with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.

Oh, a wonderful pudding! Bob Cratchet said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs. Cratchet since their marriage.
---------------------

Is anyone familiar with this dessert and why it is so difficult to make and serve? With all the ceremony attached to this scene, I would imagine it has some special significance also.

Barbara






Oh, my that is a production. Thanks, Peppermill. Now I see why Mrs. Cratchet was nervous. This must take days to make!

--JUST BEFORE SERVING---
Garnish with holly
Ignite with brandy

---deleted the mixing details---

Spoon mixture into the 2 prepared molds. If molds don't have lids, cover each with a circle of waxed paper, then a piece of foil pleated across the center and securely tied in place. Leave overnight in refrigerator.

Put molds in a large saucepan with enough water to come halfway up the sides of the molds. Cover and steam for 5 hours; remove from the water.

Let cool completely, then cover with a clean piece of waxed paper and a pudding cloth (muslin or closely woven cheesecloth) secured with a string and ends of the cloth tied in a knot over the pudding mold.

Leave in the refrigerator to mature before using. Before serving, steam about 3 hours. Remove from mold. Bring to the table blazing in 'ignited brandy, and with Christmas holly stuck into the top!
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dulcinea3
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding

A year or two ago, I bought a small imported Christmas pudding at Homegoods. Then I found the hard sauce in the regular grocery store. The pudding came in a white earthenware bowl, with a cloth drawstring 'bonnet' as a cover. I was able to heat both the pudding and the sauce in the microwave. I didn't turn the pudding out of the bowl, as would probably be traditional, to serve it molded; I just spooned out what I wanted each time. It was pretty good! And the white bowl is the perfect size for dip, candies, etc.

I don't know how they do those round puddings, which you commonly see in illustrations, and as appears to be described in the novel - "like a speckled cannon-ball".
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perfect_hostess
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding

Some other British holiday traditions that we don't see in the book, but are interesting nonetheless (I spent Christmas in London two years ago, and had been in England for three months prior, so I was well exposed to all their interesting traditions).

1) Mincemeat pies - These are little tiny pot pie-like dishes that have mincemeat and, normally raisins in them. You really have to develop a taste for them, as they're not that great, in my opinion. However, if you ever go to a British holiday party, you will see trays upon trays of these things.

2) Mulled wine - This is hot wine with mulled spices mixed in. A very interesting, acquired taste.

3) Christmas crackers - These popper party favors sometimes make an appearance here in the States, but they're everywhere in the UK. They sell them by the boxfull in all sorts of stores, from Harrod's (super-expensive) to Carlton's (a fairly reasonably-priced card store, like Hallmark). They ALWAYS come with a tissue paper hat inside, but the candies and gifts can vary.

4) Brussel sprouts - I don't know why, but these are like the mashed potatoes or green bean casserole of the British Christmas dinner. For weeks leading up to Christmas, cooking shows and talk shows have recipes and tips on how to cook them without making them soggy.

5) Lack of public transport - All public transportation shuts down around 5 p.m. on Christmas Eve, and all stores shut down around that time, too. There is no public transport (buses, trains, subways) for the 25th and 26th, and schedules are very limited on the 27th. The only way to get around cities is by foot or in a taxi.

6) Dickens' house is open on Christmas Day, and always has mincemeat pies, mulled wine and readings from his works. It's a fun thing to do.

7) Christmas pantos - These pantomimes, or plays, are EVERYWHERE during the season. Many of them tend toward traditional Christmas themes, such as Santa, but many don't. I've heard of Cinderella being played at Christmas, along with just about any other kid-friendly play imaginable. All churches, schools and community theater groups have pantos.

If I think of more, I'll post them!
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding

Thanks for these impressions, perfect! Yes; any others you may think of will be interesting for our readers as well.

How is Father Christmas handled over there? The same as Santa Claus in the States, where children sit on his lap in stores and malls, etc. and tell him what they'd like for Christmas?

~ConnieK



perfect_hostess wrote:
Some other British holiday traditions that we don't see in the book, but are interesting nonetheless (I spent Christmas in London two years ago, and had been in England for three months prior, so I was well exposed to all their interesting traditions).

1) Mincemeat pies - These are little tiny pot pie-like dishes that have mincemeat and, normally raisins in them. You really have to develop a taste for them, as they're not that great, in my opinion. However, if you ever go to a British holiday party, you will see trays upon trays of these things.

2) Mulled wine - This is hot wine with mulled spices mixed in. A very interesting, acquired taste.

3) Christmas crackers - These popper party favors sometimes make an appearance here in the States, but they're everywhere in the UK. They sell them by the boxfull in all sorts of stores, from Harrod's (super-expensive) to Carlton's (a fairly reasonably-priced card store, like Hallmark). They ALWAYS come with a tissue paper hat inside, but the candies and gifts can vary.

4) Brussel sprouts - I don't know why, but these are like the mashed potatoes or green bean casserole of the British Christmas dinner. For weeks leading up to Christmas, cooking shows and talk shows have recipes and tips on how to cook them without making them soggy.

5) Lack of public transport - All public transportation shuts down around 5 p.m. on Christmas Eve, and all stores shut down around that time, too. There is no public transport (buses, trains, subways) for the 25th and 26th, and schedules are very limited on the 27th. The only way to get around cities is by foot or in a taxi.

6) Dickens' house is open on Christmas Day, and always has mincemeat pies, mulled wine and readings from his works. It's a fun thing to do.

7) Christmas pantos - These pantomimes, or plays, are EVERYWHERE during the season. Many of them tend toward traditional Christmas themes, such as Santa, but many don't. I've heard of Cinderella being played at Christmas, along with just about any other kid-friendly play imaginable. All churches, schools and community theater groups have pantos.

If I think of more, I'll post them!


~ConnieAnnKirk




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perfect_hostess
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Re: Trivia: Christmas Pudding

Well, now that I think about it, I don't really know. I tried to stay out of most stores around the Christmas season, simply because I knew it would be mad.

However, if I remember people telling me correctly, that doesn't happen as often as it does here. I believe that's a particularly American tradition.
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Re: Trivia: Father Christmas

Thanks, perfect_hostess. I stay away from stores as much as possible now, myself, in the U.S.! :smileywink:

~ConnieK



perfect_hostess wrote:
Well, now that I think about it, I don't really know. I tried to stay out of most stores around the Christmas season, simply because I knew it would be mad.

However, if I remember people telling me correctly, that doesn't happen as often as it does here. I believe that's a particularly American tradition.


~ConnieAnnKirk




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Choisya
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Re: Trivia: Plum Pudding & Mince Pies

[ Edited ]
The plum puddings served in Dicken's time would usually (and for poorer people without basins) have been boiled in a muslin cloth and were round. Mrs Beeton's recipe gives the option of a basin 'mould' or traditional boiling (My grandmother boiled them in the wash boiler!):-

http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/christmas/sites/content/pages/christmas_pudding.shtml

Two particular traditions appertain to the eating of Christmas pudding, the first is the placing of a large (clean) silver coin in the pudding before cooking which, hopefully, the youngest member of the family will find and not accidentally swallow! The second is pouring a generous portion of brandy over the pudding just before serving and setting it alight - it is then brought with ceremony from the kitchen into the darkened dining room, usually by the proud cook!:smileyhappy: (Or lit at the dining room table if the kitchen is a distance away and a draught could blow the flames out!)

I hope that some of you, after reading The Christmas Carol, will also try making a traditional plum pudding to enjoy after your Christmas Day lunch! Over here they are traditionally made in October to allow the alcohol to become thoroughly absorbed into the fruit and pudding but the sooner the better! Those of us who no longer make them ourselves look out for them at Autumn Fairs, where there are sure to be some on sale, jars of Mincemeat too, which have been made by ladies of the Women's Institute.:smileyhappy: You might think of making some in the late summer, for your own 2008 Autumn fairs.

Christmas pudding is followed by equally alcoholic mince pies (which are no longer made with spiced minced meat but with fruits and suet):-

Scroll down for a photo of mince pies and an old recipe for the mincemeat, which I think may not be available in the US:-

http://www.historicfood.com/Pie%20recipe2.htm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/wine/main.jhtml?xml=/wine/2007/11/10/edxantheextra110.xml

The mincemeat is spooned into shortcrust pastry cases which are either 'crossed', 'latticed' or 'lidded' with shortcrust pastry and baked in a hot oven for around ten minutes until golden brown. My grandmother's tip for golden brown pastry was to substitute one tablespoon (1oz) of Birds (yellow) custard powder for 1 tablespoon of SR flour to the 16oz, which both shortens the pastry and lightly colours it.

Mince pies are served warm with cream and the lids can be lifted before serving to pour further brandy onto the mincemeat. A sprinkling of icing sugar, to resemble snow, is then sifted over them. Yummy!

Enjoy! After eating all this everyone usually has a little nap before opening their Christmas presents - except the children of course!!:smileysurprised:












Peppermill wrote:
Here's a recipe for Plum Pudding (no plums) or also called Christmas Pudding from Harrod's, the London department store known for its fine foods section (among other departments):
http://www.recipeland.com/recipe/11200/


Message Edited by Choisya on 12-05-2007 07:35 AM
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Re: Trivia: Plum Pudding & Mince Pies

And are about ten pounds heavier! Thanks, Choisya, that is quite interesting. I seemed to remember having Mince pies as a child in Rhode Island. Somehow I associate it with raisins in a pie crust but I don't know how it was made.
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Choisya
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Re: Trivia: Now for Xmas Lunch!

LOL Barbara! Mincemeat is made with raisins but also with other dried fruits and shredded suet, so your memory is partly correct:smileyhappy:.

I have often wondered what Americans have for lunch on Xmas Day given that it is only a short time since they had a big Thanksgiving dinner - is it the same sort of food?

The Cratchits of course had Goose for Xmas dinner and that was my grandmother's favourite, though I think she only chose it because it provided lots of grease to make poultices and ointments with for the rest of the year! She also bought pheasant from the local poacher:smileyvery-happy:. Goose (and duck) are making a bit of a comeback over here but turkey has become fashionable too. Turkey wasn't eaten much in the UK until the late 60s, chickens being favoured - usually large de-sexed Capons for a family. Our family meal has several similarities to that described by Dickens in Stave III but is much more extravagant because, luckily, we are not poor.

My family is very traditional about Xmas food and for lunch we eat the old-fashioned meats of roast stuffed chicken, roast pork with crackling and apple sauce and roast ham with a clove and honey glaze. For vegetarians we cook nut roasts and roast chestnuts. With the meat are served white potatoes 'mashed' with milk and butter, roast potatoes, roast parsnips, carrots and the ubiquitous brussel sprouts, about which many jokes are made - you either love 'em or hate 'em! Either a gravy made with the juices of the meat or a bread sauce is served as an accompianment. Because of the heavy meat and dessert courses an hors d'oeuvre isn't served but a glass of port wine or claret is drunk as a toast to Santa or to absent family members. Red, white and rose wine will be served with the meal and my daughters made their annual 'booze cruise' to France yesterday to get that and the cheese - and Belgian chocolates:smileysurprised::smileyvery-happy:. We also say a very irreverent, tongue-in-cheek 'grace' composed by my grandfather:

Lord be thanked for what we're gettin'
Let's be quick and get it etten
Lord wash pots up!

Oh! and at the start of the lunch 'crackers' are pulled which have paper hats, little gifts and 'mottoes'/jokes in them - then the eating/drinking/reading of jokes begins! Do Americans pull crackers at the Xmas meal?

If anyone has room for tea, cold meat is sliced from the roasts and served with picallilli and/or pickled onions, bread and butter. This will be followed by an iced and marzipanned Christmas cake which, incidentally, has the similar rich ingredients and alcohol of the Xmas pudding. There will also be a cheese board with Cheddar and Cheshire cheese and nowadays folks may add ripe French Brie and/or Camembert. So I think more than the estimated ten pounds in weight may be put on! Not exactly a healthy meal but it is, for us, eaten only once a year! Between Xmas and New Year we tend to live on the scraps and 'cookups' (I love fried mashed potatoes!), then on New Year's Day I cook a modest Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding for everyone (15):smileyhappy:, after which we have a chocolate 'yule log':smileyhappy:.

After these big family meals we make music with a variety of instruments, sing, and play charades - just as my parents, grandparents and great grandparents, used to do. We have great fun at these annual family gatherings and very rarely quarrel - although the grandchildren have their 'spats'!

Now tell me what Americans do for their 'traditional' family Xmas?






BarbaraN wrote:
And are about ten pounds heavier! Thanks, Choisya, that is quite interesting. I seemed to remember having Mince pies as a child in Rhode Island. Somehow I associate it with raisins in a pie crust but I don't know how it was made.


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LindaEducation
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Re: Trivia

All this talk of food is making my stomach growl...:smileyhappy:)

When I was a child it was my Grandma's (my Mom's Mom) job to make the mince meat pies
every Thanksgiving and Christmas. When my Dad was dating my Mom he didnt like mince meat but sooned learned to love the pies. All of us kids love mince meat and my oldest sister still makes it for us during the holidays. My hubby loves it too. Here in eastern Missouri we used to have several Tippins Pie Pantries(they are now closed), but they used to have the awesomest mince meat pies and of course sold the brandy topping too. I think they still sell their pies at the Dierbergs Markets (a local supermarket). YUMM!!!
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dulcinea3
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Re: Trivia: Now for Xmas Lunch!

Because Americans have such diverse ethnic backgrounds, it's more difficult to pin down a 'traditional American' Christmas dinner. I think that many families do have turkey again. Roast beef is also a traditional dinner that comes to mind. My mother was never big on roast beef, but some years my college roommate has visited me at Christmas when my parents were down visiting my brother and his family in Florida, and we always have roast beef and Yorkshire pudding (she brings the roast, and I make the pudding). Growing up, I don't remember having a specific thing for Christmas. For Thanksgiving, it was turkey, although now we have chicken because a turkey is too large for the three of us. One year we did have a capon, and I loved it, but I could never convince my mother to have one again.

Christmas crackers aren't an American tradition, but we have so many Anglophiles, that they are popular in some circles. I see them in the stores sometimes, and am tempted, but they always seem quite expensive.

Opening gifts is probably the universal American tradition! Even there, families will differ. We always opened them on Christmas morning, when my brother and I woke up. Later, I found out that some friends' families opened them on Christmas Eve, so I pestered my parents until we changed our tradition to open just one each on Christmas Eve, and the rest the following morning. We would have long socks hung up on the mantel, with fruits, candies, and small gifts, which we usually kept until last, after all the other gifts had been opened. My mother would usually put some practical things in the stockings, like a toothbrush and/or a comb. Many families also have a tradition of putting out milk and cookies, or some other treats, for Santa, and the parents are obliged to eat and drink them during the night, to prove that Santa was there. Some even go so far as to make white footprints between the hearth and the table where they are left.

When I was a preteen, some friends and I would go caroling from house to house, but that's not really very common.

These days, if my parents are home for Christmas, I go over to their house for Christmas dinner, and afterwards we open gifts from each other and those sent by my brother and his family (they send mine to my parents' house also, for this purpose). I sit by the fireplace, where my mother has grouped together the gifts in a pile for each of us, and I distribute the gifts, one at a time, with each of us taking turns.

A personal tradition of mine is to watch 'White Christmas' on Christmas Eve. I also only play Christmas music from December 1 until at least Christmas (I love Christmas music!). My radio station that I listen to in the car obliges by doing the same, although they start before Thanksgiving, which I think is too early!
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Re: Trivia: Now for Xmas Lunch!

Thanks for all that info Dulcinea. Your 'White Christmas' sounds delightful:smileyhappy:.

At one time roast beef was such a common 'Sunday roast' here that it wouldn't be considered special enough for Xmas or New Year but now beef is expensive and has slipped into the luxury class! Being a Yorkshirewoman I cook Yorkshire pudding in the traditional way, in some of the fat and juices of the meat, and serve it as an hors d'ouevre. Many people nowadays serve it in little patty tins. How do you serve it?

Present opening times vary here too - folks from mainland Europe have the tradition of opening them on Xmas Eve and those with children can't hold back until Xmas lunchtime, although keeping some presents back to be opened in front of the family is quite common. Putting a sock/stocking/pillowcase at the end of the bed on Xmas Eve is a tradition here too and oranges, once a luxury, are one of the things still placed in them, as are new coins. We leave Santa a mince pie and a glass of sherry and the children always leave something for the reindeer too! If Santa drank all those glass of sherry put out for him, he would never get to deliver the presents! Door to door carol singing is still fairly common here and is done to collect for charity - or just for some extra pocket money.

Christmas crackers are fun - you should try them! We always buy the expensive ones because they usually have quite nice little gifts in them, which addd to the occasion. Quite a few people make their own, in which case the gifts can be even better. Here is a simple do-it-yourself cracker making 'recipe' and some jokes to put inside them!:-

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2601789.stm







dulcinea3 wrote:
Because Americans have such diverse ethnic backgrounds, it's more difficult to pin down a 'traditional American' Christmas dinner. I think that many families do have turkey again. Roast beef is also a traditional dinner that comes to mind. My mother was never big on roast beef, but some years my college roommate has visited me at Christmas when my parents were down visiting my brother and his family in Florida, and we always have roast beef and Yorkshire pudding (she brings the roast, and I make the pudding). Growing up, I don't remember having a specific thing for Christmas. For Thanksgiving, it was turkey, although now we have chicken because a turkey is too large for the three of us. One year we did have a capon, and I loved it, but I could never convince my mother to have one again.

Christmas crackers aren't an American tradition, but we have so many Anglophiles, that they are popular in some circles. I see them in the stores sometimes, and am tempted, but they always seem quite expensive.

Opening gifts is probably the universal American tradition! Even there, families will differ. We always opened them on Christmas morning, when my brother and I woke up. Later, I found out that some friends' families opened them on Christmas Eve, so I pestered my parents until we changed our tradition to open just one each on Christmas Eve, and the rest the following morning. We would have long socks hung up on the mantel, with fruits, candies, and small gifts, which we usually kept until last, after all the other gifts had been opened. My mother would usually put some practical things in the stockings, like a toothbrush and/or a comb. Many families also have a tradition of putting out milk and cookies, or some other treats, for Santa, and the parents are obliged to eat and drink them during the night, to prove that Santa was there. Some even go so far as to make white footprints between the hearth and the table where they are left.

When I was a preteen, some friends and I would go caroling from house to house, but that's not really very common.

These days, if my parents are home for Christmas, I go over to their house for Christmas dinner, and afterwards we open gifts from each other and those sent by my brother and his family (they send mine to my parents' house also, for this purpose). I sit by the fireplace, where my mother has grouped together the gifts in a pile for each of us, and I distribute the gifts, one at a time, with each of us taking turns.

A personal tradition of mine is to watch 'White Christmas' on Christmas Eve. I also only play Christmas music from December 1 until at least Christmas (I love Christmas music!). My radio station that I listen to in the car obliges by doing the same, although they start before Thanksgiving, which I think is too early!

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Re: Trivia: Now for Xmas Lunch!

[ Edited ]
Re: Christmas dinners in the U.S.--

We are one of those American families who doesn't want turkey again at Christmas right after having a full roasted one at Thanksgiving (and leftovers for several weeks afterwards). My mother made a Christmas ham every year. The ham was covered with pineapple rings with cherries in the centers, also scored and decorated with whole cloves.

Here's a simple description/recipe of the preparation:

http://www.ehow.com/how_2064397_make-traditional-christmas-ham.html

It's decorative in presentation, and the cloves and fruit give the ham good flavor!

~ConnieK

Message Edited by ConnieK on 12-08-2007 03:08 PM
~ConnieAnnKirk




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dulcinea3
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Re: Trivia: Now for Xmas Lunch!

I certainly can't claim to be an expert at making Yorkshire pudding, having really only made it a few times, and I'm sure that a true Yorkshirewoman would put me to shame! It did seem fairly simple to make, though. We never seem to get enough drippings/fat from the roast as are required, so I put whatever measly bit we do get in, and then use melted margarine for the rest. It puffs up just lovely. I just make it in a square glass baking dish, and then cut it into squares and we have it as a side dish with the roast. It is yummy! It reminds me of popovers, which I have always loved, only in a different shape!

Making Christmas crackers reminds me of Mr. Bean! He had a box of old ones, and didn't think they 'cracked' enough, so he took the noise strips out of all of them and made one big cracker, that fairly exploded! The Christmas episode is by far the funniest one, especially with the turkey on the head! The crackers also remind me of a holiday episode of Are You Being Served?, when they all got exaggerated body parts (googly eyeglasses, fangs, big ears, etc.) as prizes.
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Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: Trivia: Chrackers

I had never heard of crackers before. They sound like fun! I found this site that tells you how to make your own:

http://www.oldenglishcrackers.com/make-your-own-crackers.htm
Contributor
johns
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-06-2007
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Re: Trivia: Chrackers

I think turkey is the most popular Christmas meal in the US, even though it is only a month after Thanksgiving. I would bet ham as a close second. In the south, tamales are tradition that comes from Mexico.

I was introduced to Christmas crackers by my brother-in-law, from Canada.

My brother and his family moved to London about 3 yrs ago. Last year they sent a Christmas Pudding for us to "enjoy". It was okay. If you like raisins, you might like it.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Trivia: Chrackers

Welcome to the book club, johns!

~ConnieK



johns wrote:
I think turkey is the most popular Christmas meal in the US, even though it is only a month after Thanksgiving. I would bet ham as a close second. In the south, tamales are tradition that comes from Mexico.

I was introduced to Christmas crackers by my brother-in-law, from Canada.

My brother and his family moved to London about 3 yrs ago. Last year they sent a Christmas Pudding for us to "enjoy". It was okay. If you like raisins, you might like it.


~ConnieAnnKirk




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