Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Wealth in A CHRISTMAS CAROL

How does Dickens treat wealth in his holiday novel? Is it a blessing or a curse to those who have it? Why?
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Contributor
johns
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎12-06-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wealth in A CHRISTMAS CAROL

I think he is trying to say that wealth, in and of itself, isn't a bad thing. It is what you do with it. From Scrooge's eyes, Fred is not wealthy, because he spends money on gifts, entertaining, and Christmas. But, Fred is apparently doing pretty well, because he can afford to entertain, has a "harp" (which I'm guessing is like a spinnet piano), etc. Then, Fred has a "wealth" that goes beyond money. Fred has two kinds of wealth.

Scrooge is wealthy, but doesn't even spend money on himself. He could make his own life a bit more comfortable without being selfish. He has only one kind of wealth, at first.

Bob Crachit has the family kind of wealth, but not the money kind.

So we get to see different kinds of wealth and the impacts. By the end of the story, all three have a blend of "wealth".
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wealth in A CHRISTMAS CAROL



johns wrote:
I think he is trying to say that wealth, in and of itself, isn't a bad thing. It is what you do with it. From Scrooge's eyes, Fred is not wealthy, because he spends money on gifts, entertaining, and Christmas. But, Fred is apparently doing pretty well, because he can afford to entertain, has a "harp" (which I'm guessing is like a spinnet piano), etc. Then, Fred has a "wealth" that goes beyond money. Fred has two kinds of wealth.

Scrooge is wealthy, but doesn't even spend money on himself. He could make his own life a bit more comfortable without being selfish. He has only one kind of wealth, at first.

Bob Crachit has the family kind of wealth, but not the money kind.

So we get to see different kinds of wealth and the impacts. By the end of the story, all three have a blend of "wealth".





I like that summation of the whole weath thing. That does it up pretty good.
Frequent Contributor
JesseBC
Posts: 278
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wealth in A CHRISTMAS CAROL

I don't know if I agree or not.

Christmas Carol has become such a part of pop culture that the polemical aspects of it get lost. It's mostly remembered now as a feel-good story of personal transformation, yet Dickens drew Scrooge and the Cratchits as pretty stark caricatures which seem to suggest that wealth creates evil while the poor are pure of heart.

We've injected more contemporary shades of grey into it now, but Victorian writing was often much more black-and-white this way and Dickens was certainly an advocate for the poor and quite critical of the aristocrats who ignored their plight.





johns wrote:
I think he is trying to say that wealth, in and of itself, isn't a bad thing. It is what you do with it. From Scrooge's eyes, Fred is not wealthy, because he spends money on gifts, entertaining, and Christmas. But, Fred is apparently doing pretty well, because he can afford to entertain, has a "harp" (which I'm guessing is like a spinnet piano), etc. Then, Fred has a "wealth" that goes beyond money. Fred has two kinds of wealth.

Scrooge is wealthy, but doesn't even spend money on himself. He could make his own life a bit more comfortable without being selfish. He has only one kind of wealth, at first.

Bob Crachit has the family kind of wealth, but not the money kind.

So we get to see different kinds of wealth and the impacts. By the end of the story, all three have a blend of "wealth".


Users Online
Currently online: 11 members 428 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: