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thinker
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Re: Chapters 1-10 (Chapter 1 and 2) SPOILER

Sorry bentley, i've been out of it for a few days, but i'm back, the weekends are quite a busy time for me




bentley wrote:


thinker wrote:
its ok Bentley, its not a spoiler, thats only if you go beyond chapter 10
Gee, you're really getting into the story!!

We get a bit of suspense at chapter 5 "An Inspiration"

I wait for you to catch up!!

Hmm... theres only a ten year difference, well what do you think of the stranger at the castle at the beginning!




Thinker,

I now see what you are talking about in terms of the stranger at the castle at the beginning. Very strange indeed. I discuss my feelings about this in the section dealing with Chapters Twenty to Thirty or thereabouts.

I am certainly caught up and would love to hear more of your take on this work...as of this post I am on chapter 24.

Regards,

Bentley


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Re: Chapters 1-10 (Chapter 6 ) SPOILER



thinker wrote:
Well Bentley
this point you made "felt that he was superior in every way" it takes me over to the "Hank Morgan" thread, remember ConnieK asking if we like or dislike him? Dont you not agree that this "superiority complex" if i must put it that way, definitely had an adverse effect on him?







bentley wrote:
Thinker, I read the next chapter and was amazed how he survived at all with the likes of Clarence..thank god the eclipse was scheduled for that day because Clarence in trying to help almost caused his death and demise. I have to say that he was a very quick thinker. The eclipse and his knowledge of that eclipse really saved him; but he really did look down on these people and I believe felt that he was superior in every way.







Thinker,

Yes, I do feel it had an adverse effect upon him. He really could not see the beauty in the simplicity of the lives of the people and their childlike eagerness with which they greeted new things and even their circumstances. He was so bent on making them more like himself and like the life he led that he could not embrace the status quo or learn anything from it. Many of his inventions were destructive ones which were used to secure or enhance his own power.

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Re: Chapters 1-10 (Chapter 6 ) SPOILER

Agreed Bentley
Hank also didnt consider what would happen in the aftermath of certain deeds only "impressing" these humble folk, in some ways however i can see him trying to teach these people to live by their own choises and not only allow authority to dictate their lives, but he obviously forgot that he had gone pretty far back in time and such characteristics were being developed within them. He should not have been so straightforward with his ideas, maybe a bit more subtle, let the change be more gradual,
later on we see him realising his mistakes a bit too late.
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Re: Chapters 1-10 (Chapter 6 ) SPOILER



thinker wrote:
Agreed Bentley
Hank also didnt consider what would happen in the aftermath of certain deeds only "impressing" these humble folk, in some ways however i can see him trying to teach these people to live by their own choises and not only allow authority to dictate their lives, but he obviously forgot that he had gone pretty far back in time and such characteristics were being developed within them. He should not have been so straightforward with his ideas, maybe a bit more subtle, let the change be more gradual,
later on we see him realising his mistakes a bit too late.




Somehow with a man learning from his mistakes..I am wondering if Twain was musing about himself.
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Illustrations

Not sure where to put this, please move it if it belongs somewhere else. I am finding the illustrations fascinating. It's taking me a long time to read the relatively short chapters because I am too busy studying the illustrations and trying to figure out their (hidden?) meanings.

"Just after the novel was published, he (Twain) wrote Beard (the illustrator): 'To my mind the illustrations are better than the book - which is a good deal for me to say, I reckon.'"

"Beard go everything that I put into that book and a little more besides."

Both quotes are from p. XXXVI in the B&N edition.
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Chapter 7

I thought the destruction of Merlin's tower was pretty funny and ingenious. I don't particularly like Hank, but he's definitely a quick thinker.
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Re: Chapters 1-10

[ Edited ]
I feel like I'm only "glimpsing the surface" to this story so far. I wish I was more familiar with Twain's time so that I would understand what he was satirizing more fully. That said, I am enjoying the story, I just have this nagging little feeling that I'm missing something.

Thanks for the information about the explorations in Africa going on in Twain's time Everyman. That gives me a new way to approach this reading.

Message Edited by KristyR on 11-15-2007 11:53 PM
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Re: Chapter 7

Hi Kristy
I guess his quick thinking has alot to do with his "engineers" training and most definitely the environment within which he work. But thoughtout the book Hank seems to forget at times that he is in the past and does not think before he acts. His quick thinking was for dealing with the arms factory brutes not for re-writing history.

Thinker



KristyR wrote:
I thought the destruction of Merlin's tower was pretty funny and ingenious. I don't particularly like Hank, but he's definitely a quick thinker.


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Re: Chapters 1-10

Hi, Kristy. I think the main thing that Twain is satirizing is New Englanders and other Americans of the nineteenth century. Hank is not Mark Twain or Samuel Clemens; he is a Connecticut Yankee. His criticisms of the established medieval church are the criticisms of a New Englander, the heir of those who fought hard to have their own churches, unimpeded by government. Hank is an American inventor, an entrepreneur, satisfied with his own ideas and critical of anything foreign. I think the best book to read along with CY is Mark Twain's Innocents Abroad. Like the smug American tourists visiting Europe for the first time in that book, Hank is a smug American tourist visiting Arthur's England. That's my take on the book, anyway. Laurel

KristyR wrote:
I feel like I'm only "glimpsing the surface" to this story so far. I wish I was more familiar with Twain's time so that I would understand what he was satirizing more fully. That said, I am enjoying the story, I just have this nagging little feeling that I'm missing something.

Thanks for the information about the explorations in Africa going on in Twain's time Everyman. That gives me a new way to approach this reading.

Message Edited by KristyR on 11-15-2007 11:53 PM


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Re: Chapter 7


thinker wrote:
... I guess his quick thinking has alot to do with his "engineers" training...

Actually, in my experience engineers are not quick thinkers; they're thorough thinkers. They like to plan things out carefully before they act.
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Re: Chapters 1-10

Thanks, Laurel! I think you're right on, here.

~ConnieK



Laurel wrote:
Hi, Kristy. I think the main thing that Twain is satirizing is New Englanders and other Americans of the nineteenth century. Hank is not Mark Twain or Samuel Clemens; he is a Connecticut Yankee. His criticisms of the established medieval church are the criticisms of a New Englander, the heir of those who fought hard to have their own churches, unimpeded by government. Hank is an American inventor, an entrepreneur, satisfied with his own ideas and critical of anything foreign. I think the best book to read along with CY is Mark Twain's Innocents Abroad. Like the smug American tourists visiting Europe for the first time in that book, Hank is a smug American tourist visiting Arthur's England. That's my take on the book, anyway. Laurel

KristyR wrote:
I feel like I'm only "glimpsing the surface" to this story so far. I wish I was more familiar with Twain's time so that I would understand what he was satirizing more fully. That said, I am enjoying the story, I just have this nagging little feeling that I'm missing something.

Thanks for the information about the explorations in Africa going on in Twain's time Everyman. That gives me a new way to approach this reading.

Message Edited by KristyR on 11-15-2007 11:53 PM





~ConnieAnnKirk




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Re: Illustrations

This is a great topic, KristyR. I'll start a new thread for it...For those who may be reading different editions of this novel, you might like to know that the B&N Classics edition (the one we are linked to at the top of the page) includes almost all of the original 221 illustrations from the novel.

~ConnieK



KristyR wrote:
Not sure where to put this, please move it if it belongs somewhere else. I am finding the illustrations fascinating. It's taking me a long time to read the relatively short chapters because I am too busy studying the illustrations and trying to figure out their (hidden?) meanings.

"Just after the novel was published, he (Twain) wrote Beard (the illustrator): 'To my mind the illustrations are better than the book - which is a good deal for me to say, I reckon.'"

"Beard go everything that I put into that book and a little more besides."

Both quotes are from p. XXXVI in the B&N edition.


~ConnieAnnKirk




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Re: Illustrations

That's really impressive! I'll have to see if there's room on my shelves for yet another book. I have the Easton Press edition, which is illuminated by many very fun line drawings by Honore Guilbeau.

ConnieK wrote:
This is a great topic, KristyR. I'll start a new thread for it...For those who may be reading different editions of this novel, you might like to know that the B&N Classics edition (the one we are linked to at the top of the page) includes almost all of the original 221 illustrations from the novel.

~ConnieK



KristyR wrote:
Not sure where to put this, please move it if it belongs somewhere else. I am finding the illustrations fascinating. It's taking me a long time to read the relatively short chapters because I am too busy studying the illustrations and trying to figure out their (hidden?) meanings.

"Just after the novel was published, he (Twain) wrote Beard (the illustrator): 'To my mind the illustrations are better than the book - which is a good deal for me to say, I reckon.'"

"Beard go everything that I put into that book and a little more besides."

Both quotes are from p. XXXVI in the B&N edition.





"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Re: Chapters 1-10


Laurel wrote:
Hi, Kristy. I think the main thing that Twain is satirizing is New Englanders and other Americans of the nineteenth century. Hank is not Mark Twain or Samuel Clemens; he is a Connecticut Yankee. His criticisms of the established medieval church are the criticisms of a New Englander, the heir of those who fought hard to have their own churches, unimpeded by government. Hank is an American inventor, an entrepreneur, satisfied with his own ideas and critical of anything foreign. I think the best book to read along with CY is Mark Twain's Innocents Abroad. Like the smug American tourists visiting Europe for the first time in that book, Hank is a smug American tourist visiting Arthur's England. That's my take on the book, anyway. Laurel

KristyR wrote:
I feel like I'm only "glimpsing the surface" to this story so far. I wish I was more familiar with Twain's time so that I would understand what he was satirizing more fully. That said, I am enjoying the story, I just have this nagging little feeling that I'm missing something.

Thanks for the information about the explorations in Africa going on in Twain's time Everyman. That gives me a new way to approach this reading.

Message Edited by KristyR on 11-15-2007 11:53 PM





Thanks Laurel, this helps me "flesh out" the story in my mind.
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thinker
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Re: Chapter 7

Hey Everyman
Some are thorough thinkers



Everyman wrote:

thinker wrote:
... I guess his quick thinking has alot to do with his "engineers" training...

Actually, in my experience engineers are not quick thinkers; they're thorough thinkers. They like to plan things out carefully before they act.


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