Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Time Travel

[ Edited ]
CONNECTICUT YANKEE is thought to be one of the first novels to deal with the concept of traveling through time. What do you think of Twain's use of the time device in the story? Is it an effective strategy to go back in time in order to make commentary about the present time? Why or why not?

Message Edited by ConnieK on 10-27-2007 09:48 AM
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Frequent Contributor
thinker
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎08-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Time Travel

Though the book is most adventurous and humorous. I dont think the time travelling method is effective, mainly because the individual has no control over his goings, as compared to lets say "The Time Machine" where the time traveller could have gone back and forth as he pleased.


Thinker





ConnieK wrote:
CONNECTICUT YANKEE is thought to be one of the first novels to deal with the concept of traveling through time. What do you think of Twain's use of the time device in the story? Is it an effective strategy to go back in time in order to make commentary about the present time? Why or why not?

Message Edited by ConnieK on 10-27-2007 09:48 AM


Thinker
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Time Travel

To me, it isn't so much a matter of time travel, since Morgan doesn't choose to travel through time, or even know that he is doing it until it's done. It's more a matter of time displacement. Interesting and enjoyable, but to me a somewhat different thing.

In a way, Don Quixote was a sort of precursor to Connecticut Yankee, since Don Quixote really traveled in his mind and actions back to the days of knights and chivalry and believed himself living then.

{Grammar question: should it be precursor to or precursor of? I debated but wasn't sure. Any grammarians here willing to jump in? Or is either one acceptable?)

ConnieK wrote:
CONNECTICUT YANKEE is thought to be one of the first novels to deal with the concept of traveling through time. What do you think of Twain's use of the time device in the story? Is it an effective strategy to go back in time in order to make commentary about the present time? Why or why not?

Message Edited by ConnieK on 10-27-2007 09:48 AM


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Time Travel

[ Edited ]
I kept thinking of Don Quixote, too, and I think he's mentioned somewhere in Twain's book. I also kept thinking of Twain's space-travel (on Earth) book, The Innocents Abroad. And yes, I think displacing the character(s) and giving their reactions to the new situation tells more about them and their world than about the new world. Very effective!

Grammar: The example sentences I found all use 'of.' Here are two from the Oxford Concise Thesaurus:

1. a three-stringed precursor of the guitar: FORERUNNER, predecessor, forefather, father, antecedent, ancestor, forebear.
2. a precursor of disasters to come: HARBINGER, herald, sign, indication, portent, omen.



Everyman wrote:
To me, it isn't so much a matter of time travel, since Morgan doesn't choose to travel through time, or even know that he is doing it until it's done. It's more a matter of time displacement. Interesting and enjoyable, but to me a somewhat different thing.

In a way, Don Quixote was a sort of precursor to Connecticut Yankee, since Don Quixote really traveled in his mind and actions back to the days of knights and chivalry and believed himself living then.

{Grammar question: should it be precursor to or precursor of? I debated but wasn't sure. Any grammarians here willing to jump in? Or is either one acceptable?)

ConnieK wrote:
CONNECTICUT YANKEE is thought to be one of the first novels to deal with the concept of traveling through time. What do you think of Twain's use of the time device in the story? Is it an effective strategy to go back in time in order to make commentary about the present time? Why or why not?

Message Edited by ConnieK on 10-27-2007 09:48 AM





Grammar: The example sentences I found all use 'of.' Here are two from the Oxford Concise Thesaurus:

1. a three-stringed precursor of the guitar: FORERUNNER, predecessor, forefather, father, antecedent, ancestor, forebear.
2. a precursor of disasters to come: HARBINGER, herald, sign, indication, portent, omen.

Message Edited by Laurel on 10-30-2007 09:26 AM
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Time Travel



Everyman wrote:
To me, it isn't so much a matter of time travel, since Morgan doesn't choose to travel through time, or even know that he is doing it until it's done. It's more a matter of time displacement. Interesting and enjoyable, but to me a somewhat different thing.

In a way, Don Quixote was a sort of precursor to Connecticut Yankee, since Don Quixote really traveled in his mind and actions back to the days of knights and chivalry and believed himself living then.

{Grammar question: should it be precursor to or precursor of? I debated but wasn't sure. Any grammarians here willing to jump in? Or is either one acceptable?)

ConnieK wrote:
CONNECTICUT YANKEE is thought to be one of the first novels to deal with the concept of traveling through time. What do you think of Twain's use of the time device in the story? Is it an effective strategy to go back in time in order to make commentary about the present time? Why or why not?

Message Edited by ConnieK on 10-27-2007 09:48 AM







Since I am actually reading this classic for the first time and yet loved books and movies with time travel in them, I have to agree with Everyman that this is not time travel where the protagonist had a choice or even knew that he was involved with time travel until he discovered his predicament. I surmise that his real body was knocked unconscious and this is what happened to him during that time period (real or not). He somehow found himself in a different time and place (not the 1800s and not Connecticut). You have to love how he strategizes right away how he is going to succeed and survive in this displacement (not yet how he is going to return).
Frequent Contributor
thinker
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎08-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Time Travel

Yes Bentley
he seems to only concern himself with survival now and forgets all about returning to his time,
PS. you've just started reading, so I wont be a spoiler, but you'll see a much better example of this later on
Thinker
Users Online
Currently online: 62 members 754 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: