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donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

Yes, they did because of the particular geisha in the novel. I think that was why they were quick to say the geisha ranked as a higher position in society than a mistress or a prostitute. The focus was on beauty and how it was a part of her life, not on how it was her profession. We didn't even discuss much about how she didn't really have a choice of a different profession or of whether maybe deep down inside didn't want to be a geisha. In this novel, there was a point where the young girl decided she really, truly wanted to become a geisha. And her story actually isn't aesthetic because her choice is intertwined with the influence and passion she feels for another character she eventually falls in love with. So, the discussion of whether geishas in general lived aesthetic lives of beauty valued by men and women or were marketable commodities didn't develop independent of the novel's main character.

Denise
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fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

Denise, I'm sorry getting back to you so late about this. I'd like to have more of these off topic discussions, which leads me back to the need for a general discussion section and/or thread.
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donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

No problem, Bob. This is just the type of discussion that would have been moved to a "Community Room". Especially since it no longer has anything to do with John Steinbeck!

Denise
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songgirl7
Posts: 59
Registered: ‎03-22-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

I know I'm resurrecting an old thread here, but how can there be an American Classics board without Steinbeck?

OK, Grapes of Wrath is not my favorite, but East of Eden is a masterpiece.
See what I'm reading now: Goodreads.com


"I can't stop drinking the coffee. I stop drinking the coffee, I stop the standing, and the walking and the putting-words-into-sentences doing."
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sunny4328
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!



fanuzzir wrote:
I'm looking for one more voice, pro or con, to weigh in on the Steinbeck question. So far, there is such ambivalence I'm a little reluctant to push a thread on people. Any Mice and Men lovers out there?




I can't say I love the book, simply because it's so sad, but I do think it's a great book and find it an interesting read.
~Kristy
McKinney, TX
Frequent Contributor
sunny4328
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!



fanuzzir wrote:


donyskiw wrote:
I didn't know that but I bet it was funny. I just remember it being a very amusing book. Especially after reading The Pearl and then going on to read East of Eden. I got a free movie coupon for a rental from Blockbuster. I'll look to see if they have it. Sometimes they don't carry older films, especially if they haven't been converted to DVD. Then I have to borrow them from the library.

Denise


I never did see the movie, but I knew they were going to try to create more sparks between the two antagonists in the story if they ever made a movie out of it. Anyone watch Grapes of Wrath lately? Here's an author whose filmed novels starred both Henry Fonda and Debra Winger. When was the last time you saw them in the same sentence?




I taught Grapes of Wrath to sophomore gifted kids this year. For the most part, they liked the book. Some preferred the story, others the intercalary chapters, but overall they were really impressed with Steinbeck as a writer and agreed that he deserved the Pulitzer for the novel. We also watched the movie. Now, 16 year olds watching a movie from 1940 is rough. However, watching it with them, I have to admit that I didn't care much for it. They totally and completely changed the ending, which was such a huge part of the novel.
~Kristy
McKinney, TX
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

Steinbeck isn't the author I would choose to read here, but if there's enough interest to make a vigorous discussion, I could be persuaded. :smileyhappy:

fanuzzir wrote:
I'm looking for one more voice, pro or con, to weigh in on the Steinbeck question. So far, there is such ambivalence I'm a little reluctant to push a thread on people. Any Mice and Men lovers out there?

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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

We have a lot of interest in Steinbeck, but I think the forums without moderators become shapeless. Any one interested? I'd love a guided reading of "East of Eden."
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

I see this conversation has been going on since November, but nothing has been decided. That's what I meant!:smileytongue: I'm a newbie here. Do we set up a poll as a new thread to start a new reading, or can only a moderator do that??

And, no, I can NOT moderate. Don't know enough about Steinbeck.
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!



foxycat wrote:
And, no, I can NOT moderate. Don't know enough about Steinbeck.

Actually, you could moderate perfectly well. All that's needed is enthusiasm, not knowledge.

Early on, there were a number of reader-moderated discussions. For some reason, they have largely disappeared, but it's easy enough to start one. Just go to the home page of the American Classics, click on New Message, enter a topic like "Discussion of Grapes of Wrath," and invite people to discuss the book with you. That's one of the things BNBC was designed to facilitate.

If there is interest, the discussion will take off. If not, well, you've done what you could. You don't need to be an expert to moderate; it's sufficient to point to a few on-line references (such as an on-line biography of the author), ask some interesting questions about the book (if you don't have any in mind, check out the Cliffs Notes or Spark Notes topics for essay questions or quiz questions) and encourage participation.

It just takes not waiting for somebody else to do it, but taking the initiative and doing it yourself!

P.S. Hope this doesn't sound too "preachy." But not everybody may have been here in the early weeks of the Book Clubs when the concept of reader-initiated discussions was discussed and encouraged by the powers that be. So a reprise of those days may be useful to newcomers.
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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

Maybe after I retire. I'm up to my ears.



Actually, you could moderate perfectly well.
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Frequent Contributor
CallMeLeo
Posts: 513
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

I would be interested in joining a discussion on Steinbeck, or someone mentioned in another thread, Fitzgerald's 'This Side of Paradise'.

When I think of Steinbeck I think of East of Eden or Grapes of Wrath. I know he wrote others. Grapes of Wrath appeals more because of the Great Depression, a time in American History I have peripheral knowledge of but never read about in Fiction.

Fitzgerald has appeal because of the beauty found in his use of language.

But, I think few check this forum anymore.:smileysad: I would jump in if it gets started.
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historybuff234
Posts: 536
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

Hey everyone, I have never read Steinbeck before and I'm wondering what Of Mice and Men is about? Would that be better to read first or The Grapes of Wrath? Wow! It's quite on this board lately! Wonder why?
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
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bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!



historybuff234 wrote:
Hey everyone, I have never read Steinbeck before and I'm wondering what Of Mice and Men is about? Would that be better to read first or The Grapes of Wrath? Wow! It's quite on this board lately! Wonder why?




Just a suggestion: Of Mice and Men first, then The Grapes of Wrath.
Frequent Contributor
historybuff234
Posts: 536
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!



bentley wrote:


historybuff234 wrote:
Hey everyone, I have never read Steinbeck before and I'm wondering what Of Mice and Men is about? Would that be better to read first or The Grapes of Wrath? Wow! It's quite on this board lately! Wonder why?




Just a suggestion: Of Mice and Men first, then The Grapes of Wrath.




Thanks, what is Of Mice and Men about?
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
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platinumpink
Posts: 405
Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

I watched Of Mice and Men...quite good, but very tragic!
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!



platinumpink wrote:
I watched Of Mice and Men...quite good, but very tragic!





I have the book but havent seen the film. Guess I should try it. I havent read the book either. Alot of people liked it.
New User
steven88
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-28-2008
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

of mice and men is a good story in my opinion because its major theme is the american dream which is increasingly difficult to attain in modern times because of increased competition from other people trying to reach the "Top."
Contributor
misskenton
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎06-05-2008
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

Ok If you've have watched the movie bu thaven't read the book thats a complete shame, no offense or anything but I read the book in like an hour! Its short and you can't get those kinda of lengthy descriptions given by Steinbeck in the movie!!!
Don't condemn me; remember that sometimes I too can reach the bursting point.
~Anne Frank
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: And don't forget John Steinbeck!!!

A nice article from the Washington Post on Steinbeck. (May require free registration.)
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