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prince_alfie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?

I would love to cover Gravity's Rainbow in a solid discussion here. It's one of my all time favorites!
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Everyman
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Re: Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?



prince_alfie wrote:
I would love to cover Gravity's Rainbow in a solid discussion here. It's one of my all time favorites!




That suggestion might better be made in the Fiction and Literature section rather than in the Classics section. While as I have noted before the definition of "classic" is loose and far from universally agreed on, as used by BNU it has generally meant pre-WWII books, and in most cases pre-WWI. A book, however good, that hasn't yet been exposed to its third or fourth generation of readers might not yet really fit the definition of a classic.

Reading recent fiction can certainly be of value, but trying to discuss such books in the classics section may dilute the ability of posters to focus on what are more generally accepted as classic writings.
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Diana621
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?



prince_alfie wrote:
I would love to cover Gravity's Rainbow in a solid discussion here. It's one of my all time favorites!



I'd love to do Gravity's Rainbow. And it's one of those books that I need the push of a group to read!


Diana

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fanuzzir
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Registered: ‎10-22-2006
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Re: Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?

Gravity's Rainbow doesn't fall under the definition of American classics shared by BN. Please bring your enthusiasm to the Fiction and Literature website!
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Everyman
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Re: Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?

[ Edited ]

fanuzzir wrote:
Gravity's Rainbow doesn't fall under the definition of American classics shared by BN. Please bring your enthusiasm to the Fiction and Literature website!




What IS the definition of American classics according to BN? It will help to know so we can make appropriate suggestions.

Message Edited by Everyman on 12-30-200611:00 PM

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prince_alfie
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Re: Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?

Sadly enough, I posted it on the Fiction and Literature section but no one seems to be interested... i guess Harry Potter is more dominant there?
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Re: Anyone else up for Thomas Pynchon?



prince_alfie wrote:
Sadly enough, I posted it on the Fiction and Literature section but no one seems to be interested... i guess Harry Potter is more dominant there?




Give it some time, you posted it today. HP has its own board.

ziki
toomanybookstoolittletime
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definition of a classic



Everyman wrote:What IS the definition of American classics according to BN?




I know your question was directed to B&N but I just happened to come across a definition today (by Anthony Burgess/intro to Gormenghast) that is useful:
"....'classics'-eloquent, authoritative, definitive statements begotten by an epoch but speaking for more than that epoch."

ziki :-)
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Laurel
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Re: definition of a classic


ziki wrote:


I just happened to come across a definition today (by Anthony Burgess/intro to Gormenghast) that is useful:
"....'classics'-eloquent, authoritative, definitive statements begotten by an epoch but speaking for more than that epoch."

ziki :-)




Lovely, ziki! Thanks!
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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