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kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Topical Poe



KristyR wrote:


pmcoulter wrote:


KristyR wrote:


pmcoulter wrote:
I had the opportunity to teach Poe a couple of years ago to 10th graders in an alternative school. I had not really liked Poe when I had to read him in high school and college, but when I had to teach him I was stunned by the richness of his description and his mastery of the language.

Relative to someone's comment on marriage and wives, Poe dearly loved his little cousin-wife.


He married his cousin? We were joking that he should never marry because of the end of his wife in The Black Cat, come to think of it, his second wife didn't stand much of a chance in Ligeia either!




Yes. Not the best site, but for a jumping off point, cf: http://www.poemuseum.org/poes_life/index.html


Hey! You helped me get a question right on the Friday quiz in the Community Room! The question asked which American poet married his young cousin, had a drinking problem, etc. This was the first quiz out of 4 that I actually knew an answer, thanks!




Wow! I have learned things about Edgar Allen Poe I didn't know! I was thinking the author that married his cousin was someone else besides Poe.
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historybuff234
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I just read The Masque of Red Death a few days ago, I loved it. I really can't say that I have a ton of favorites yet, because I have not read alot of Poe's works yet. I am going to read soon The Murders in the Rue Morgue. It sounds very good. I also read the Sphinx a few days ago, very good. A suprising ending though, it only turned out to be a tiny insect on the window. You could almost compare it to when Orson Welles broadcsted War of the Worlds on radio in the 30s. People got so afriad Martians had invaded it turned out like the story, a false alarm.
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
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Amoedo
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

A very curious fact on Poe is that he was the first man, in Modern Age, whom lived just with the money of his books.
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Lethargic1
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎07-27-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I think because Poe is so widely taught from middle school up through high school he gets lost in the shuffle of great authors, and he downlplayed quite a bit. Great short stories that aren't as widely read as "The Black Cat" and "Tell-Tale" would be

"The Masque of the Red Death" and "Never Bet the Devil Your Head." Both are interesting from a cultural point of view. The second one is a nice satire of Transcendentalism. You definitely can't go wrong by reading "The Fall of the House of Usher" or "Murders of the Rue Morgue." I don't know what I find to be better though, his poetry or his short stories. I like them both.
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APenForYourThoughts
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Registered: ‎06-22-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

Favorite Poe Poem: It's a toss-up between The Raven and Annabel Lee. I guess it would be The Raven. Hmmm...
Favorite Poe Story: Probably The Red Masque of Death. I haven't read very many of Poe's stories, but I think The Red Masque of Death was my favorite out of the ones I have read.
I'm adding Poe to my reading list!
"A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us." --Kafka
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historybuff234
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

[ Edited ]
I think for confused on your favorite story AP, I think that it's The Masque of Red Death, not The Red Masque of Death. But I'll look it up, but I think I'm right though.:smileyhappy:

Message Edited by historybuff234 on 08-01-2007 06:43 PM
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
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APenForYourThoughts
Posts: 394
Registered: ‎06-22-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

[ Edited ]
AAAHHH!!! Sorry, you're right. That's what I get for posting too quickly! Either way, it's still my favorite Poe story. Thanks for bringing that to my attention, though. I definitely won't make that mistake again! I think I may have written it incorrectly on another board somewhere, though. Anyway, thanks. :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by APenForYourThoughts on 08-01-2007 07:04 PM
"A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us." --Kafka
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historybuff234
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I enjoyed reading The Masque of Read Death. I also enjoyed The Sphinx, it was a weird story but it was good. I'd like to read more of him, which I will be doing this summer.
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
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agnijay
Posts: 1,987
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I read the Masque of Read Death, and the other one about the catacombs. I don't like his stories much, they are not sick like some say they are, but they are just gruesome. Of course, having such a traumatic life must make a difference...
☼☺♥ Jaya ♥☺☼

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thinker
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎08-17-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

M.S. in a Bottle was quite good.
I also liked The Fall of the House of Usher
Cask of Amontillado
Tell tale heart
William Wilson
Masque of the red death
Murders in the Rue Morgue
etc
etc
etc
Thinker
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platinumpink
Posts: 405
Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I read some Poe Short Stories in English Class and I liked "The Masque of Red Death", "The Tell-Tale Heart", another one involving a cat getting killed, "The Casque of Amontillado"
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe



platinumpink wrote:
I read some Poe Short Stories in English Class and I liked "The Masque of Red Death", "The Tell-Tale Heart", another one involving a cat getting killed, "The Casque of Amontillado"




I loved the tell-tale heart.
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dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I love Poe in general, and he has so many amazing works. My personal favorite is 'The Masque of the Red Death'. The color imagery in that one fascinates me. He has some good humorous ones, too, like the one about the Kickapoo Indians. 'The Raven' is my favorite poem, and also 'The Bells'.
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momgee
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Registered: ‎07-24-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe



kiakar wrote:


platinumpink wrote:
I read some Poe Short Stories in English Class and I liked "The Masque of Red Death", "The Tell-Tale Heart", another one involving a cat getting killed, "The Casque of Amontillado"




I loved the tell-tale heart.

I still can't stand the sound of a beating heart! That one gave me nightmares.
Kaye

 
"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."
Groucho Marx
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kiakar
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe



momgee wrote:


kiakar wrote:


platinumpink wrote:
I read some Poe Short Stories in English Class and I liked "The Masque of Red Death", "The Tell-Tale Heart", another one involving a cat getting killed, "The Casque of Amontillado"




I loved the tell-tale heart.

I still can't stand the sound of a beating heart! That one gave me nightmares.
Kaye

 


Yes, me too! And to think they were required back then, in the old days. ha.
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Fiction4Sale
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Registered: ‎08-24-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I certainly remember one thing about discovering Poe in my teen years and that was the physical-ness of his stories. As previously noted, part of the effectiveness of his horror is the sensory description of the body under stress...the violation of the sanctity of the "body suit" being the worst fear, i.e., eyes poked out, cuts to body, enormous stress like heavy weights, burning, ghastly smells of the crypt. Wes Craven says the secret to great horror is our fear of having our "body" violated in some permanent manner. I remember one of Poe's short short stories, I think it was about a clock in a clock tower; and the main character, from his point of view, climbs up to get a view of the village from the clock tower. Unfortunately he sticks his head through an opening in the clock face and remains too long; the giant metal clock hand moves next to his neck and traps him there. Then follows the extended awareness of the character feeling the gigantic minute hand cutting into his neck...slowly we feel him dying, a slow guillotine in effect, and then to gross the reader out...we feel the head cut through (one of his eyes pops out of the socket from the pressure) and it falls to the pavement and for a fleeting second...as I remember it from long long ago...we see the square and up above the relentless march of the clock hand before fade out. I remember after reading that story I had a headache...I felt like one of those pop-eye goldfish. For a teen boy...even despite the sometime formal, stilted 19th century language, this was great stuff! Wow...I knew that most of the fiction assigned at school gave me a headache...but this stuff, discovered by me alone, now this was a headache well worth the pain!
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alfprof212
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Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

As a Poe enthusiast, I love reading his stories over and over again.  I mentioned earlier that my favorite Poe tale is "Tell-Tale Heart."  My other favorites include "Cask of Amontillado" and "The Mask of the Red Death."  While thinking back on my experience with Poe, I also remembered an oft forgotten story called "Hop-Frog."  It is an interesting tale of a crippled court jester who exacts a grusome revenge on his tyrant king and gets to run away with the girl!  Take a minute to read this tale and others on the website below:
 
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Rbkh0
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Registered: ‎01-29-2008
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

My favorite of Poe's stories include "Black Cat", "Murders in the Rue Morgue", "Bon-Bon", and "Tell-Tale Heart". Although I've read many more of his stories than his poems, I also enjoyed "Annabel Lee" and "The Raven". Poe is one of my favorite authors.
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TiggerBear
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

Cask of Amontillado, is my absolute favorite.
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NamelessHereForEvermore
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Re: Edgar Allan Poe

I love Poe! I just got his book of Poems and short talls from B&N a few weeks ago. My favorite poem so far is "The Raven". I love his use of words in it and it's so much fun to read.
~NamelessHereForNevermore
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