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fanuzzir
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Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March

I am pleased to announce the featured book discussions for the upcoming winter months, worked out in consultation with BN book editors and the members of the classics group:

For January, the featured discussion is Upton Sinclair's The Jungle.
For February, we will be continuing our discussion of Hemingway short stories; a beautiful collection will soon be featured on our website for your purchase.
For March we are trying something new: a double feature, so to speak, combining a classics discussion of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn and an author discussion of the new novel Finn, a retelling of the Twain novel by Jon Clinch. We will have the opportunity to read the original and discuss with the author his creative choices. It promises to be a fascinating and unique experience, which is why BN editors suggested that we make this our next venture.

Still on many readers' minds are Alcott's Little Women, Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Hawthorne's Scarlet Letter, and Cather's My Antonia. I haven't forgotten any of these, or your wishes; I hope logistical problems can be ironed out so that we can get to these throughtout the year.

Please plan your participation in advance so that you can puchase the book in a timely manner. I look forward to continuing the fascinating discussion we have had about Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville into these new literary territories.
Bob
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fanuzzir
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Re: Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March

An addendum to the preceeding message: the stated schedule was for FEATURED discussions. There is still room for book club member to start their own threads in topics of their own choosing. Just keep in mind the limits of members' time and propose perhaps one extra text per month, if you wish, at the most.
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PaulK
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Re: Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March

I think it is a great list of books to discuss. I would suggest that since several have been discussed twice in the old BNU that you alternate those with books not discussed yet. I would like to suggest working in works of more recent vintage such as a Roth, Updike or Morrison.
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Choisya
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Re: Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March

Can Roth, Updike or Morrison yet be considered American Classics Paul? Their works may turn up in the Modern fiction sections. You could, of course, in line with Fanizzir's previous post here, start thread of your own with any one of these authors' books.




PaulK wrote:
I think it is a great list of books to discuss. I would suggest that since several have been discussed twice in the old BNU that you alternate those with books not discussed yet. I would like to suggest working in works of more recent vintage such as a Roth, Updike or Morrison.


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PaulK
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Re: Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March



Choisya wrote:
Can Roth, Updike or Morrison yet be considered American Classics Paul? Their works may turn up in the Modern fiction sections. You could, of course, in line with Fanizzir's previous post here, start thread of your own with any one of these authors' books.




PaulK wrote:
I think it is a great list of books to discuss. I would suggest that since several have been discussed twice in the old BNU that you alternate those with books not discussed yet. I would like to suggest working in works of more recent vintage such as a Roth, Updike or Morrison.







I think all three are already considered with the greatest of American writers. IMO some of their works surpass several of the classics that we studied in the old BNU. I would agree that a classic should pass a test of time. They are just suggestions to add some variety. I will not be starting any threads for new books since there has been more than enough to read.
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Katelyn
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Re: Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March



PaulK wrote:
I think it is a great list of books to discuss. I would suggest that since several have been discussed twice in the old BNU that you alternate those with books not discussed yet. I would like to suggest working in works of more recent vintage such as a Roth, Updike or Morrison.


I would be interested in these selections after January. I tend to like to read more recent books.
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fanuzzir
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Re: Reading schedule for January, Februrary, and March

Can Roth, Updike or Morrison yet be considered American Classics

Paul, thank you for your thoughtful feedback. I am heartened that you present these writers as classics, which I think they are. There may be BN marketing designations, however, for those books that would put them in a certain book club, despite the fact that they all are writing literature that will be studied as Melville's and Hemingway's are. This is worth a query to BN, so please hold on the line for me.
Bob
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