Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
fanuzzir
Posts: 1,014
Registered: ‎10-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Laurel-Weather

I'm a snow lover, and have been the beneficiary of some major blizzards on the east coast the last few years. Unfortunately, it's all gone in a few days and life returns to "normal." In the midwest, however, I remember snow and extreme cold as a permanent condition, something that made 20 degrees feel like springtime. I was in Michigan during the winter once, and it was ALWAYS snowing, like someone leaving a dryer on. White noise. And that wind in Chicago (another of my stops) is so wicked they call it "The Hawk."
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

Historybuff,

how do you talk about books that you didn't read?
It must be with difficulty.
ziki
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sip & Chat: T S Eliot

Yes, I enjoyed the original West End production of this musical many years ago and it has had a revival just recently.




holyboy wrote:
Choisya

The musical "Cats" is as most know based on "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats" and other poetical works of Eliot's. I had not been aware of the other poem aspects until watching a fim biography in which T.S. Eliot was interviewed and asked about some of his lines and I realized the words were used in Cats also.

Cats make good muses for writers. Currently we have four.


Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

This thread on this board hasn't been used for awhile, but it seemed a good spot to sip an after Christmas feast cup of tea and to extend greetings to all.

I know this is the American classics board, but Laurel has posted Christmas poems on the Epics board, and, while looking for others, I came across this little piece by Christina Rossetti that somehow has the same after festivities feel as my cup of tea, so am sharing it here:

Clouds
By Christina Rossetti

White sheep, white sheep,
On a blue hill,
When the wind stops
You all stand still
When the wind blows
You walk away slow.
White sheep, white sheep,
Where do you go?

If you do want some American works, try these sites:
http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weather/arts/whittier.htm
http://www.theofficenet.com/~jack/arts/snowstrm.html
http://personal.bhm.bellsouth.net/bhm/l/g/lgriner/christmas/the-first-snowfall.htm

Or find the poem "Christmas Bells" written by Longfellow during the despair of the Civil War. You can see it and hear it read aloud here:
http://classicpoetryaloud.podomatic.com/entry/2007-12-22T01_46_46-08_00
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

[ Edited ]
That one was made into a song we know, with a slight name change. Thanks for the link. Don't like Longfellow, but it's a good site for listening. Unfortunately, Hardy is poorly represented. If you ever find other such sites, post them.

http://www.actionext.com/names_f/frank_sinatra_lyrics/i_heard_the_bells_on_christmas_day.html

___________________________________________________________________________________
Pepper wrote:
Or find the poem "Christmas Bells" written by Longfellow during the despair of the Civil War. You can see it and hear it read aloud here:
http://classicpoetryaloud.podomatic.com/entry/2007-12-22T01_46_46-08_00

Message Edited by foxycat on 12-25-2007 10:28 PM
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

I've been to a nearby tea shop, Pepper, and I'm also sipping tea. But now I'm hooked on single estate teas. This one is an FOP (Flowery Orange Pekoe) from the Tiger Hill tea estate, in the Nilgiris region of India. Smooth as glass. Were you in the tea vs. coffee discussion at the community Room?
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat


foxycat wrote:
I've been to a nearby tea shop, Pepper, and I'm also sipping tea. But now I'm hooked on single estate teas. This one is an FOP (Flowery Orange Pekoe) from the Tiger Hill tea estate, in the Nilgiris region of India. Smooth as glass. Were you in the tea vs. coffee discussion at the community Room?
No, but I "heard" about it, and read at least parts of it very quickly. I was impressed by the connoisseur knowledge and taste buds! This week, tea is largely a vehicle for drinking honey for my ragged throat for me, unfortunately. But, the smooth, hot sweet liquid has been more soothing than cough syrup. Now, hopefully the healing qualities of honey are true.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

Anything sugary is soothing for a sore throat. It's a shame to have a cold this week. Did it mess up your Christmas?

I spent all Christmas day trying to retrieve my internet connection. I hadn't been invited anywhere this year (my Jewish family doesn't do Christmas)so it wasn't a great loss. Then a Christmas miracle happened. I called Verizon a got a techie who actually UNDERSTOOD WHAT I WAS SAYING!! And she didn't force me to go back and repeat all the basics I had already done!! There is a Santa!!

I'm not a connoisseur of tea, just know I can't drink the bagged stuff any more. I'm a relative beginner on whole leaf teas. Everyman really knows his stuff, and Choisya.

My best friend in OK and I exchanged (mailed) gifts while on the phone. It's usually Skype, but my internet was down.



Peppermill wrote:

foxycat wrote:
...>No, but I "heard" about it, and read at least parts of it very quickly. I was impressed by the connoisseur knowledge and taste buds! This week, tea is largely a vehicle for drinking honey for my ragged throat for me, unfortunately. But, the smooth, hot sweet liquid has been more soothing than cough syrup. Now, hopefully the healing qualities of honey are true.


Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat--19th Century Poets

[ Edited ]
Pepper--

You were talking in Idylls about how poetry had changed with the times. Do you think there are any 19th Century American poets as good as Tennyson? In fact, without doing research, I can't even think of any 19th Century American poets except Longfellow, who wrote awful doggerel.

Message Edited by foxycat on 12-27-2007 04:24 AM
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat--19th Century Poets


foxycat wrote: Pepper--You were talking in Idylls about how poetry had changed with the times. Do you think there are any 19th Century American poets as good as Tennyson? In fact, without doing research, I can't even think of any 19th Century American poets except Longfellow, who wrote awful doggerel.
Rochelle -- Don't know who might qualify for "as good as," but the first name that came to mind for me was Walt Whitman. The excerpts below are from his Wikepedia entry:

"Walter Whitman (May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, journalist, and humanist. He was a part of the transition between Transcendentalism and Realism, incorporating both views in his works. His works have been translated into more than twenty-five languages.[1] Whitman is among the most influential and controversial poets in the American canon. His work has been described as a 'rude shock' and 'the most audacious and debatable contribution yet made to American literature.'[2]"


"Walt Whitman's influence on contemporary American poetry is so fundamental that it has been said that American poetry divides into two camps: that which naturally flows from Whitman and that which consciously strives to accept it.[citation needed] Whitman's great talents presented a complex paradox for the modernist poets T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound, who recognized his value but feared the implications of his influence.

"During the height of modernism, Whitman continued to present 'a problem' until he was rescued by such influential poets as William Carlos Williams and Hart Crane. Later, Allen Ginsberg and the beat poets would become the most vociferous champions of Whitman's expansive, abundant, humanistic America. Ginsberg begins his famous poem "Supermarket in California" from Howl and Other Poems with a reference to Whitman. The hand of Whitman can be seen working in such diverse twentieth-century poets as John Berryman, E.E. Cummings, Galway Kinnell, Langston Hughes, Philip Levine, Kenneth Koch, James Wright, Joy Harjo, William Carlos Williams, Mary Oliver, Bob Dylan, Jerry Wemple and June Jordan, to name only a few. Whitman was also revered by international poets ranging from Pablo Neruda to Rimbaud to Federico García Lorca to Fernando Pessoa.

"Yale professor and literary critic Harold Bloom considers Walt Whitman to be one of the five most important American poets. The others in Bloom's pantheon are Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, Hart Crane, and Robert Frost. Whitman also had a huge influence on the British novelist and poet D. H. Lawrence. Contemporary Spokane Indian poet, Sherman Alexie, has also been influenced by Whitman, mentioning him explicitly in his poem 'Defending Walt Whitman'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Whitman

Of the five most important American poets named by Bloom, Emily Dickinson is the only other one entirely of the 19th century.

Emily Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886)
Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955)
Harold Hart Crane (July 21, 1899 – April 27, 1932)
Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963)

I see "humanist" strongly associated with comments about Whitman. But don't look to me for poetry expertise!
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

foxycat wrote {excerpts} and Peppermill responses: Anything sugary is soothing for a sore throat. It's a shame to have a cold this week. Did it mess up your Christmas?

Yes, it did -- we swapped a city Xmas for a suburban one. But still had a nice, quiet, pleasant time.

I spent all Christmas day trying to retrieve my internet connection. I hadn't been invited anywhere this year (my Jewish family doesn't do Christmas) so it wasn't a great loss. Then a Christmas miracle happened. I called Verizon a got a techie who actually UNDERSTOOD WHAT I WAS SAYING!! And she didn't force me to go back and repeat all the basics I had already done!! There is a Santa!!

WOW! You got lucky! Or, as you say, there are still miracles.

PS -- I am one of those still willing to recognize X as the Greek letter for Christ.
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat--19th Century Poets

I'd forgotten about Dickinson and Whitman. I read quite a bit of Emily in college, understood very little. It's strange that there are no poetry boards here, aside from some of the epics.
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Frequent Contributor
AJ981979
Posts: 118
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

The Greek X translates to "Chi", as in Christ. :smileyhappy: There's a campus Christian group called Chi Alpha (roughly meaning Christ First) that's growing quickly.
~ Happiness is a good book, a sleeping cat, and a glass of wine. ~
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

I've already looked it up on the internet. I've always wondered how the X came in.

Anyone for discussing American classic poetry?
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat



foxycat wrote:
Anyone for discussing American classic poetry?


Who do you consider classic American poets? How far back would you go?
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
AJ981979
Posts: 118
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

oo that sounds interesting! Who are you thinking? Or is there an anthology we could use?




foxycat wrote:
I've already looked it up on the internet. I've always wondered how the X came in.

Anyone for discussing American classic poetry?


~ Happiness is a good book, a sleeping cat, and a glass of wine. ~
Inspired Contributor
foxycat
Posts: 1,626
Registered: ‎06-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

Before you ask: No, I'm not moderating a poetry book in January.

I guess Dickinson or Whitman. The American 19th Century selection is slim, and I really dislike the Modernists--Pound, Eliot, Stevens. Unless of course someone else wants the Modernists. It was an amorphous idea. I know no one wants to moderate, and the discussions I've seen here without moderators just wander all over. Note the "discussion" of Poe on this board.

There are loads of anthologies, but anyone who's not copyrighted any more is also available on the net.


AJ981979 wrote:
oo that sounds interesting! Who are you thinking? Or is there an anthology we could use?




foxycat wrote:
Anyone for discussing American classic poetry?





Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

Frequent Contributor
Timbuktu1
Posts: 1,572
Registered: ‎12-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

Well, with some trepidation I've signed up for a course on William Faulkner. I've never read him before but the time and teacher were great. It starts June 25, if anyone is interested in discussing his work I'm sure I'll be desperate for some insight! :smileywink:
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat

Good luck. I've never been able to get into him. Tried several times, failed every time. I'm sure there's some good stuff there I'm missing, but I'll just have to keep missing it.

Timbuktu1 wrote:
Well, with some trepidation I've signed up for a course on William Faulkner. I've never read him before but the time and teacher were great. It starts June 25, if anyone is interested in discussing his work I'm sure I'll be desperate for some insight! :smileywink:


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
Timbuktu1
Posts: 1,572
Registered: ‎12-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sip and Chat



Everyman wrote:
Good luck. I've never been able to get into him. Tried several times, failed every time. I'm sure there's some good stuff there I'm missing, but I'll just have to keep missing it.

Timbuktu1 wrote:
Well, with some trepidation I've signed up for a course on William Faulkner. I've never read him before but the time and teacher were great. It starts June 25, if anyone is interested in discussing his work I'm sure I'll be desperate for some insight! :smileywink:







I was afraid of that.
Users Online
Currently online: 46 members 319 guests
Recent signins:
Please welcome our newest community members: