Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Reader
MrPleshko
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎08-04-2008
0 Kudos

The neglected classics?

Hello, everyone.

 

I'm new to the American classics board.  My name is Kevin and I teach American lit at a large prep school in the central U.S.

 

I had a question that this board might be interested in discussing: What are the "neglected classics of American literature" in your view?  Those novels hailed by the scholars and the press, but that seem to fall by the wayside of popular readership?  Those works that can stand up next to a Great Gatsby, Huckleberry Finn or Grapes of Wrath, yet have not, for whatever reason, found a readership in academia and beyond?

 

I'm curious to see what comes up in response to this question, and will also respond when I have it figured out a bit more clearly as well.

 

Thanks for your time,

 

Kevin 

Frequent Contributor
Timbuktu1
Posts: 1,572
Registered: ‎12-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The neglected classics?


MrPleshko wrote:

Hello, everyone.

 

I'm new to the American classics board.  My name is Kevin and I teach American lit at a large prep school in the central U.S.

 

I had a question that this board might be interested in discussing: What are the "neglected classics of American literature" in your view?  Those novels hailed by the scholars and the press, but that seem to fall by the wayside of popular readership?  Those works that can stand up next to a Great Gatsby, Huckleberry Finn or Grapes of Wrath, yet have not, for whatever reason, found a readership in academia and beyond?

 

I'm curious to see what comes up in response to this question, and will also respond when I have it figured out a bit more clearly as well.

 

Thanks for your time,

 

Kevin

 

 

I'm not sure if this would qualify but I think "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin" should be read by all American schoolchildren.  I also read "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" with my daughter and it was so beautiful I wondered why it wasn't read more often.

So much of assigned literature is more depressing than inspirational.  Kids need models of good behavior and paths to success.

 

I also think that something like Huckleberry Finn should be taught in conjunction with Rousseau.  It's important to teach it conceptually or it will just be seen as an adventure story. 


 

Contributor
SKELLINGTON
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎06-11-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The neglected classics?

Hi Kevin-

 

I read "To Kill a Mockingbird" when I was in school and it truly had a huge impact on me. Still to this day...I think of it. Even the film was brilliant, such a simmple story with such a great moral. It makes me want to read it again, and I think I will. I think that is what a great book does, it stays with you.

 

Andrew/Skellington

Users Online
Currently online: 46 members 242 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: