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Jessica
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Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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The Book as a Whole: The Setting

Do you think The God of Animals is a "western" novel? Why or why not? What details or descriptions does Kyle use to create an evocative setting?


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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The Book as a Whole: The Setting


Jessica wrote:

Do you think The God of Animals is a "western" novel? Why or why not? What details or descriptions does Kyle use to create an evocative setting?



Reply to this message to discuss any of these topics. Or start your own new topic by clicking "New Message."

Note: This topic refers to the book as a whole.



I don't think of it as necessarily a "western" novel but maybe its because of what I think of as western novels. To me a western novel, is about the old west,like stories by oh whats his name? Lamour? something like that? Gunfights, old towns, saloons, farmers, ranchers, cattle runs, stuff like that lol. Maybe this is a modern western, I dont know, interesting, what section would it be under in bookstores or libraries that have western sections? Would they put it there just because its about a horse business? It was so new, I found it in the just in section lol. I think of it as kind of a coming of age story that happens to be set in a western state where the family business is a horse stable. But that could be anywhere in the country really. It has some western flavor to it when I think about Jerry and the rodeos , or the posse's parties but being about horses doesnt make it one to me and nothing about what the girls at school do at school or after makes me think it is. If it were the kind I consider a western novel, like i described above, I never would have bought it to read actually. I am sooo not cowboy or about cowboy stuff, I would be Donnie Osmond's rock and roll to Marie's little bit country LOL! :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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