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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Middle Chapters

Please use this thread to begin discussing your ideas about Child 44 through the end of the chapters that begins, "Moscow, 5 July " which ends on page 189 in my copy.
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syost77
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎06-18-2008
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Re: Middle Chapters

I guess I'm somewhat of a sucker for propaganda. Reading the novel, absorbing Stalinist culture, for a second I actually thought, "Since Raisa doesn't seem to love Leo, maybe he should have turned her over to authorities", thus saving himself and his parents. But, to quickly follow that thought to its conclusion, Raisa would be killed. Certainly, not loving someone shouldn't be a death sentence. But, how quickly a mind can be bent to the propaganda of the time.

Also, what a powerful statement: "Leo had no idea what the real crime statistics were. He had no desire to find out since those who knew were probably liquidated on a regular basis."
(p. 176)

I'm thoroughly enjoying the novel. Superb plot and pacing. Three-dimensional characters with heart, soul, and mind.
syost77
Author
TRS_Old
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-20-2008
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Re: Middle Chapters



syost77 wrote:
I guess I'm somewhat of a sucker for propaganda. Reading the novel, absorbing Stalinist culture, for a second I actually thought, "Since Raisa doesn't seem to love Leo, maybe he should have turned her over to authorities", thus saving himself and his parents. But, to quickly follow that thought to its conclusion, Raisa would be killed. Certainly, not loving someone shouldn't be a death sentence. But, how quickly a mind can be bent to the propaganda of the time.

Also, what a powerful statement: "Leo had no idea what the real crime statistics were. He had no desire to find out since those who knew were probably liquidated on a regular basis."
(p. 176)

I'm thoroughly enjoying the novel. Superb plot and pacing. Three-dimensional characters with heart, soul, and mind.




I think your reaction is an interesting one... there is a logic to it: do I try and save my wife who hates me and in so doing risk my life and life of my parents, or do I make sure my parents are safe. Very quickly you get trapped by a terrible set of calculations which seem reasonable until you step back.


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