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Rachel-K
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Humor

What role does humor play in the novel? How did Juliet and other characters use humor during the war? How does Juliet's  taste for humor and light subjects change once the war is over?

 

What are your favorite humorous passages and characters?

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cobalt-blue
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Re: Humor

On p. 40 in Juliet's reference to Mark: "He's got that way of believing his opinion is the truth, but he's not disagreeable about it." Her perception is quite eloquent and wise, yet threaded with such humor. Reminds me of a Shakespeare line from a play he wrote. Goes something like this: "May we have the pleasure of seeing each other less and less as time passes." Both sentences sound complimentary, yet indirectly state the truth. How will Mark's cockiness affect their relationship?

 

 

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literature
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Re: Humor

You should have kept going with your description of Markham.  "Maybe he is a werewolf....I'm certain that he wouldn't think twice about eating an innocent bystander."  Juliet may have been charmed by him initially but she quickly started seeing right through him.  He would have been better off saying as little as possible to her.  But considering who he is and his opinion of himself, that would have been impossible.  He knows he comes on strong, so he knew he had to quietly make her interested.  And he succeeded.

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Annie_Barrows
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Re: Humor


literature wrote:

You should have kept going with your description of Markham.  "Maybe he is a werewolf....I'm certain that he wouldn't think twice about eating an innocent bystander."  Juliet may have been charmed by him initially but she quickly started seeing right through him.  He would have been better off saying as little as possible to her.  But considering who he is and his opinion of himself, that would have been impossible.  He knows he comes on strong, so he knew he had to quietly make her interested.  And he succeeded.


But once he had beguiled her into Claridge's, he assumed that she would fall for him. Presumptuous guy.


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Annie_Barrows
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Re: Humor


cobalt-blue wrote:

On p. 40 in Juliet's reference to Mark: "He's got that way of believing his opinion is the truth, but he's not disagreeable about it." Her perception is quite eloquent and wise, yet threaded with such humor. Reminds me of a Shakespeare line from a play he wrote. Goes something like this: "May we have the pleasure of seeing each other less and less as time passes." Both sentences sound complimentary, yet indirectly state the truth. How will Mark's cockiness affect their relationship?

 

 


He's impossibly smug, but Juliet's in an indecisive stage, so Mark's self-assurance is appealing to her.


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Wordsmith
literature
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Re: Humor

[ Edited ]

Subtle humor and fantasy fables were used to help keep the spirits up and help raise London's low morale during the war. Introducing Seneca, the Roman philosopher, who wrote letters to imaginery friends on how to behave. Cee Cee Meredith wrote poems to the freesia, daffodils and tomatoes. He entered the spirit of the thing and saw a fairy in the gloomy. Then there was Isola's Grammy and the story of her father drowning Muffin for licking the butter and the man that came along and told her the story about cats having nine lives. Solange was #4, the cat in the castle and also the cat who was awarded the Red Rosette of the Legion of Honor. I posted a message previously about how I just love the names you came up with and then appear the initials of OFO'FWW. They just fit in so well with all the names.

 

While the Germans controlled Guernsey, the Islanders had their way of retaliating against the Germans. Elizabeth painted the portrait of John Booker as Tobias Penn Piers so John would look like he was another link in the Tobias Penn Piers lineage; the death certificates for the deceased pigs and the passing of the deceased pig around in order to keep the living ones; making up the Literary Society because they were caught being out after curfew; hiding the wireless from the Germans to name just a few things. Juliet's thoughts that the malignant fairy at Adelaide's christening made her that way and who else but Isola would buy a red motor cycle?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message Edited by literature on 09-16-2008 09:54 PM
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Wrighty
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Re: Humor

I loved the humor in this book and the different ways it was used.

 

Adelaide was obnoxious and ridiculous in her humor. She felt it was her duty to tattle on the residence of Guernsey because she believed she was an upstanding Christian citizen. Her complaints were trivial and petty.

- When Juliet arrived on the dock the first day she saw a glint of light flashing in her eyes because Adelaide was spying with her opera glasses. Isola snorted and waved vigorously until it stopped.

- In a letter to Juliet - "Furthermore, the so-called Literary Society is a scandal. There are those of true culture and breeding here in Guernsey, and they will take no part in this charade (even if invited)." (Gee, who could she be thinking of?)

 

Juliet has such dry, sarcastic humor. She and Kit played games of Beauty Parlor and Dead Bride and both loved it.

- Explaining that Adelaide threatened to wash her hands of her - "I will try to bear that affliction with fortitude."

- When Sydney's trip home is delayed due to a broken leg - "What does your doctor say about your leg, Sydney - I swear you've had time to grow a new one."

 

Isola just cracked me up all of the time.

- Her self-description - "I do not have a pleasing appearance. My nose is big...One eyeball skitters up to the top, and my hair is wild and will not stay tamped down. I am tall and built of big bones."

- Telling Juliet about Elizabeth slapping Adelaide - "Yes, she did - slapped her right across the face. And it was lovely.

- Describing the chickens that chased her until she fell off the hen-house roof - "How they all came at me - with their razor lips and back-to-back eyeballs!

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Re: Humor


Wrighty wrote:

I loved the humor in this book and the different ways it was used.

 

Adelaide was obnoxious and ridiculous in her humor. She felt it was her duty to tattle on the residence of Guernsey because she believed she was an upstanding Christian citizen. Her complaints were trivial and petty.

- When Juliet arrived on the dock the first day she saw a glint of light flashing in her eyes because Adelaide was spying with her opera glasses. Isola snorted and waved vigorously until it stopped.

- In a letter to Juliet - "Furthermore, the so-called Literary Society is a scandal. There are those of true culture and breeding here in Guernsey, and they will take no part in this charade (even if invited)." (Gee, who could she be thinking of?)

 

Juliet has such dry, sarcastic humor. She and Kit played games of Beauty Parlor and Dead Bride and both loved it.

- Explaining that Adelaide threatened to wash her hands of her - "I will try to bear that affliction with fortitude."

- When Sydney's trip home is delayed due to a broken leg - "What does your doctor say about your leg, Sydney - I swear you've had time to grow a new one."

 

Isola just cracked me up all of the time.

- Her self-description - "I do not have a pleasing appearance. My nose is big...One eyeball skitters up to the top, and my hair is wild and will not stay tamped down. I am tall and built of big bones."

- Telling Juliet about Elizabeth slapping Adelaide - "Yes, she did - slapped her right across the face. And it was lovely.

- Describing the chickens that chased her until she fell off the hen-house roof - "How they all came at me - with their razor lips and back-to-back eyeballs!


I'm glad you thought all that stuff was funny--sometimes, when I was writing, I just laughed and laughed. Those chickens just kill me!


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Wrighty
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Re: Humor



Annie_Barrows wrote:

I'm glad you thought all that stuff was funny--sometimes, when I was writing, I just laughed and laughed. Those chickens just kill me!


Oh yes I thought it was funny! I laughed throughout the whole book! Some parts were outright humorous and some had such great sarcasm. And then there were other things that were meant to be serious but when I pictured them happening they made me laugh at how ridiculous they must have been. You have a great sense of humor. You and your aunt were also able to strike a good balance between the humor of the characters and the horrors of the war. Nothing was disrespectful or taken too lightly. I thought you did a great job of keeping me informed as well as entertained.

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Annie_Barrows
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Re: Humor


Wrighty wrote:


Annie_Barrows wrote:

I'm glad you thought all that stuff was funny--sometimes, when I was writing, I just laughed and laughed. Those chickens just kill me!


Oh yes I thought it was funny! I laughed throughout the whole book! Some parts were outright humorous and some had such great sarcasm. And then there were other things that were meant to be serious but when I pictured them happening they made me laugh at how ridiculous they must have been. You have a great sense of humor. You and your aunt were also able to strike a good balance between the humor of the characters and the horrors of the war. Nothing was disrespectful or taken too lightly. I thought you did a great job of keeping me informed as well as entertained.


Thanks. My aunt Mary Ann was one of the most entertaining people in the world. She would have loved to know that she made you laugh.


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