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Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Recommended Reading

Additional Recommended Reading

84, Charing Cross Road
Helene Hanff
It all began with a letter inquiring about second-hand books, written by Helene Hanff in New York, and posted to a bookshop at 84, Charing Cross Road in London. As Helene's sarcastic and witty letters are responded to by the stodgy and proper Frank Doel of 84, Charing Cross Road, a relationship blossoms into a warm, charming, feisty love affair.

Love Walked In
Marisa de los Santos
or thirty-one-year old Cornelia Brown, life is a series of movie moments, and "Jimmy Stewart is always and indisputably the best man in the world, unless Cary Grant should happen to show up." So imagine Cornelia's delight when her very own Cary Grant walks through the door of the hip Philadelphia café she manages. Handsome and debonair, Martin Grace sweeps Cornelia off her feet, becoming Cary Grant to Cornelia's Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable to her Joan Crawford. Meanwhile, on the other side of town, eleven-year-old Clare Hobbes must learn to fend for herself after her increasingly unstable mother has a breakdown and disappears. With no one to turn to, Clare seeks out her estranged father, and when the two of them show up at Cornelia's café, the lives of Cornelia and Clare are changed in drastic and unexpected ways.

Garden Spells
Sarah Addison Allen
The Waverleys have always been a curious family, endowed with peculiar gifts that make them outsiders even in their hometown of Bascom, North Carolina. Even their garden has a reputation, famous for its feisty apple tree that bears prophetic fruit, and its edible flowers, imbued with special powers. Generations of Waverleys tended this garden. Their history was in the soil. But so were their futures. A successful caterer, Claire Waverley prepares dishes made with her mystical plants—from the nasturtiums that aid in keeping secrets and the pansies that make children thoughtful, to the snapdragons intended to discourage the attentions of her amorous neighbor. Meanwhile, her elderly cousin, Evanelle, is known for distributing unexpected gifts whose uses become uncannily clear. They are the last of the Waverleys—except for Claire’s rebellious sister, Sydney, who fled Bascom the moment she could, abandoning Claire, as their own mother had years before. When Sydney suddenly returns home with a young daughter of her own, Claire’s quiet life is turned upside down—along with the protective boundary she has so carefully constructed around her heart. Together again in the house they grew up in, Sydney takes stock of all she left behind, as Claire struggles to heal the wounds of the past. And soon the sisters realize they mustdeal with their common legacy—if they are ever to feel at home in Bascom—or with each other.

The Book of Ebenezer Le Page
G. B. Edwards
Eighty years old, Ebenezer has lived his whole life on the Channel Island of Guernsey, a stony speck of a place caught between the coasts of England and France yet a world apart from either. Ebenezer himself is fiercely independent, but as he reaches the end of his life he is determined to tell his own story and the stories of those he has known. He writes of family secrets and feuds, unforgettable friendships and friendships betrayed, love glimpsed and lost. The Book of Ebenezer Le Page is a beautifully detailed chronicle of a life, but it is equally an oblique reckoning with the traumas of the twentieth century, as Ebenezer recalls both the men lost to the Great War and the German Occupation of Guernsey during World War II, and looks with despair at the encroachments of commerce and tourism on his beloved island.


Looking for a discussion? Find a Book Club for all your interests!


Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

 

I have developed an interest in WWII history as it relates to the Channel Islands after reading "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society" and in my online search about Guernsey I came across this website. An interesting resource for someone who wants to know more about the island in the novel. http://www.guernsey-society.org.uk/

Wordsmith
literature
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Re: Recommended Reading

I picked up my copy of The Book of Ebenezer Le Page tonight at B&N but will not start it until after this book club is over.  I am enjoying it too much to lose myself in another book.  


Author
Annie_Barrows
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Re: Recommended Reading


literature wrote:

I picked up my copy of The Book of Ebenezer Le Page tonight at B&N but will not start it until after this book club is over.  I am enjoying it too much to lose myself in another book.  



But don't you love knowing you have something good in store? I like to have at least two good books stacked up in reserve at all times. 


Learn more about The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

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Scribe
debbook
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Re: Recommended Reading

That's why I read more than one book at a time, so I am never not in the middle of a book.

I recently started 84, charing cross road. I like it so far. I have The Book of Ebenezer Le Page on my wish list, but I have so many tbr books at home, that it will have to wait.


Annie_Barrows wrote:

literature wrote:

I picked up my copy of The Book of Ebenezer Le Page tonight at B&N but will not start it until after this book club is over.  I am enjoying it too much to lose myself in another book.  



But don't you love knowing you have something good in store? I like to have at least two good books stacked up in reserve at all times. 


 

A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
"bookmagic418.blogspot.com
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

[ Edited ]

debbook wrote:

That's why I read more than one book at a time, so I am never not in the middle of a book.

I recently started 84, charing cross road. I like it so far. I have The Book of Ebenezer Le Page on my wish list, but I have so many tbr books at home, that it will have to wait.

 


I never read more than one book at a time until I started doing these book clubs. I've always had a tbr pile but that has increased since I started these clubs too. Now I have more to read because of the selections chosen for the clubs and also all of the great recommendations other members have given. I do love it though! I was lucky enough to receive some great books as gifts this summer and I found a few used book sales that I had to support as well. It's a good thing there aren't expiration dates on these! :smileywink:

Message Edited by Wrighty on 09-19-2008 01:21 AM
Wordsmith
literature
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Re: Recommended Reading

I always have reserves of books to read.  I buy books as I see them for future reads.  It's my security to have books and to be surrounded by books in my house.  Plus, I always listen to audio books during my commute to work.  It makes the horrific traffic a little more tolerable.  You just can't listen to and read the same types of books; otherwise, you don't know which characters/plots belong to which book.  Sometimes I also do a third book.  I take out playalongs (I don't remember the exact name they're called) to listen to while I do my walks.  But you have to have a very clear mind when doing three books!
Author
Annie_Barrows
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎08-14-2008
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Re: Recommended Reading


literature wrote:
I always have reserves of books to read.  I buy books as I see them for future reads.  It's my security to have books and to be surrounded by books in my house.  Plus, I always listen to audio books during my commute to work.  It makes the horrific traffic a little more tolerable.  You just can't listen to and read the same types of books; otherwise, you don't know which characters/plots belong to which book.  Sometimes I also do a third book.  I take out playalongs (I don't remember the exact name they're called) to listen to while I do my walks.  But you have to have a very clear mind when doing three books!

I'm always reading at least three books, one for myself and one to each of my kids. Every once in a while I get horribly confused as to what happened in which book.


Learn more about The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

Discover all Annie Barrows titles.
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
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Re: Recommended Reading


Annie_Barrows wrote: 

I'm always reading at least three books, one for myself and one to each of my kids. Every once in a while I get horribly confused as to what happened in which book.


I loved reading to my kids. I had as much fun choosing books as they did. Now they are teens and two are in college so they don't really let me read to them anymore.  :smileywink: I've always tried to read along with the high school assigned reading (when they've bothered to tell me what it is) and then I've asked them questions about it afterwards. I have boys and they just want to get their reading finished and then get outside or do something else. Their reading comprehension has always been a problem when they rush through their reading. When I read too it's a good way for us to have a discussion that helps them think about what they read.

 

I've saved all of our favorite children's books too so that my nieces and nephews can read them now and then someday my grandchildren will be able to. I still have some of my own favorites from when I was a kid!

Contributor
cobalt-blue
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎09-13-2008
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Re: Recommended Reading


Wrighty wrote:

Annie_Barrows wrote: 

I'm always reading at least three books, one for myself and one to each of my kids. Every once in a while I get horribly confused as to what happened in which book.


I loved reading to my kids. I had as much fun choosing books as they did. Now they are teens and two are in college so they don't really let me read to them anymore.  :smileywink: I've always tried to read along with the high school assigned reading (when they've bothered to tell me what it is) and then I've asked them questions about it afterwards. I have boys and they just want to get their reading finished and then get outside or do something else. Their reading comprehension has always been a problem when they rush through their reading. When I read too it's a good way for us to have a discussion that helps them think about what they read.

 

I've saved all of our favorite children's books too so that my nieces and nephews can read them now and then someday my grandchildren will be able to. I still have some of my own favorites from when I was a kid!




Wrighty wrote:

Annie_Barrows wrote: 

I'm always reading at least three books, one for myself and one to each of my kids. Every once in a while I get horribly confused as to what happened in which book.


I loved reading to my kids. I had as much fun choosing books as they did. Now they are teens and two 


are in college so they don't really let me read to them anymore.  :smileywink: I've always tried to read along with the high school assigned reading (when they've bothered to tell me what it is) and then I've asked them questions about it afterwards. I have boys and they just want to get their reading finished and then get outside or do something else. Their reading comprehension has always been a problem when they rush through their reading. When I read too it's a good way for us to have a discussion that helps them think about what they read.


 

I've saved all of our favorite children's books too so that my nieces and nephews can read them now and then someday my grandchildren will be able to. I still have some of my own favorites from when I was a kid!


 

Wrighty, I will remember your idea of reading the same books as your boys read in high school. What a great idea to be connected to the school curriculum while having thoughtful discussions with your children about the books. I have many years before my son is in high school, but as a pre-school child I do believe he cherishes the time we spend together as I read him books. I'll keep reading to him as long as he lets me.

 

Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading


cobalt-blue wrote

 

Wrighty, I will remember your idea of reading the same books as your boys read in high school. What a great idea to be connected to the school curriculum while having thoughtful discussions with your children about the booksI have many years before my son is in high school, but as a pre-school child I do believe he cherishes the time we spend together as I read him books. I'll keep reading to him as long as he lets me.

 


Oh your son absolutely loves the time you spend reading together! It becomes a whole experience for both of you and it's not just about a book anymore is it? Even for the parts he forgets from his earliest years he'll still remember the wonderful feelings associated with it. And you will never forget it either.

 

I miss the bedtime readings when my kids would have their jammies on and run excitedly into my room and jump on my bed, ready to snuggle down with me and read a stack of books. They used to fight to sit next to me so the littlest one would lay in my lap and hold my hair (that was his thing) while the other two would curl up on each side. We would have a great time reading the stories, admiring the artwork, laughing at the voices I tried to do and letting them join in as they began to read too. *sighIt's so hard when teenagers don't think they need their parents any more but mine are starting to come back around again into the "I need money and I really appreciate you more" stage! :smileyvery-happy:

 

I've also used other tricks to at least keep them interested in reading and have fun even if it's not their thing right now. We've read the backs of cereal boxes, I look for magazines about anything they've been interested in over the years, even comic books help. In fact, I think it's time to restock our bathroom reading supply with Sports Illustrated and car magazines now.

Author
Annie_Barrows
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎08-14-2008
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Re: Recommended Reading


Wrighty wrote:

Annie_Barrows wrote: 

I'm always reading at least three books, one for myself and one to each of my kids. Every once in a while I get horribly confused as to what happened in which book.


I loved reading to my kids. I had as much fun choosing books as they did. Now they are teens and two are in college so they don't really let me read to them anymore.  :smileywink: I've always tried to read along with the high school assigned reading (when they've bothered to tell me what it is) and then I've asked them questions about it afterwards. I have boys and they just want to get their reading finished and then get outside or do something else. Their reading comprehension has always been a problem when they rush through their reading. When I read too it's a good way for us to have a discussion that helps them think about what they read.

 

I've saved all of our favorite children's books too so that my nieces and nephews can read them now and then someday my grandchildren will be able to. I still have some of my own favorites from when I was a kid!


Certain people who shall be nameless (clue: I'm married to him) keep trying to get me to throw out all the baby books, but I REFUSE. That's not a baby book, I say, that's an icon of our daughters' youth. He says how can it be an icon when the pages are stuck together? And I say that makes it a personalized icon. This argument has been going on for years. I'm winning. 


Learn more about The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.

Discover all Annie Barrows titles.
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading


Annie_Barrows wrote: 

Certain people who shall be nameless (clue: I'm married to him) keep trying to get me to throw out all the baby books, but I REFUSE. That's not a baby book, I say, that's an icon of our daughters' youth. He says how can it be an icon when the pages are stuck together? And I say that makes it a personalized icon. This argument has been going on for years. I'm winning. 


Speaking of personalized icons - after I had known my husband-to-be for a few months (he was a serviceman in Germany and worked in our computer room) I wrote to his mother to send me a cookbook and let me know what he liked. She went through the whole "Sunset Cook Book of Favorite Recipes" (1962) and put check marks in the margins and for quite a few recipes she wrote her own version next to the printed text. He and I have been divorced for over 40 years but I would never get rid of the cookbook, even though it is in many pieces and must live in a plastic bag. Mother still makes her baked potatoes the way she described in the book, and at Christmas, when we all get together (my ex and I have remained good friends) I sometimes tell the story of the cookbook.

 

Annie, somewhere you described your attempt at potato pie. When I was a child we used to make potato pies (gloriefied potato pancakes that were often eaten cold the next day) and poured sugar beet syrup over them. Those beets are white and need to be slivered, boiled,pureed, pressed through a cloth and then the liquid is boiled down until it looks like honey.

 

During the war the farmer in back of our house grew poppies in the summer and beets and potatoes in the winter. My cousin and I were very creative in appropriating a beet or potato here or there. Of course my mother was much more agressive, especially after the French invasion;(liberation) she traveled by day, hiding in fields by night due to curfew, trading our silverware, dishes, linen, for a little butter or some dry milk. A lot of Germans hated farmers then, because they grew rich in possessions from our hunger.

 

I do remember crawling on my knees a whole day with my grandmother, digging up potatoes, and being paid with a loaf of bread and a few slices of bacon. Now bacon grease sandwiches are sold for two dollars at festivals, much like "soulfood" has become a specialty here. Bacon grease was a staple of my school years and I still love it, but after my "coronary artery procedure" I have finally sworn off all animal fats.  

 

I also just saw a recipe for potatoes that are mashed together with red beets - two parts beets to one part potatoes - to make a sweet pudding, maybe the consistency of rice pudding. I thought that this mash could then be fried to give it a crust.....never mind, I am on a very limited diet and often hallucinate.......  

Contributor
cobalt-blue
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎09-13-2008
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Re: Recommended Reading


Wrighty wrote:

cobalt-blue wrote

 

Wrighty, I will remember your idea of reading the same books as your boys read in high school. What a great idea to be connected to the school curriculum while having thoughtful discussions with your children about the booksI have many years before my son is in high school, but as a pre-school child I do believe he cherishes the time we spend together as I read him books. I'll keep reading to him as long as he lets me.

 


Oh your son absolutely loves the time you spend reading together! It becomes a whole experience for both of you and it's not just about a book anymore is it? Even for the parts he forgets from his earliest years he'll still remember the wonderful feelings associated with it. And you will never forget it either.

 

I miss the bedtime readings when my kids would have their jammies on and run excitedly into my room and jump on my bed, ready to snuggle down with me and read a stack of books. They used to fight to sit next to me so the littlest one would lay in my lap and hold my hair (that was his thing) while the other two would curl up on each side. We would have a great time reading the stories, admiring the artwork, laughing at the voices I tried to do and letting them join in as they began to read too. *sighIt's so hard when teenagers don't think they need their parents any more but mine are starting to come back around again into the "I need money and I really appreciate you more" stage! :smileyvery-happy:

 

I've also used other tricks to at least keep them interested in reading and have fun even if it's not their thing right now. We've read the backs of cereal boxes, I look for magazines about anything they've been interested in over the years, even comic books help. In fact, I think it's time to restock our bathroom reading supply with Sports Illustrated and car magazines now.


Another great idea to keep my son interested in reading! I had to laugh at stocking your bathroom reading supply with SI and car magazines. My son has broadened his love of reading train books from "Thomas the Tank Engine" to hobby-store train magazines that a passionate train hobbyist gave him. Thank you for sharing those tidbits with me : )

 

Wordsmith
literature
Posts: 499
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

My grandmother used to fry cut up pieces of fat from, I believe, some cut of beef and it was delicious.  As a child I never knew what it was or where it came from but hum good.  She also used to simmer the unfertilized chicken eggs in chicken soup and those were good too.  She was from a section that was considered Russia in the 1890's.  Knowing the origins of these foods now, I would never eat them.
Wordsmith
literature
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

A few years ago I read the book "Forever" by Pete Hamill.  The major part of the story took place in Manhattan going back quite a few centuries.  Being a native New Yorker and always having an interest in its history, it started me on a whole new venture.  I did and still do a lot of reading on its history.  B&N used to have classes on its website and the history of NYC was a very popular class.   There were some very knowledgeable historians that came forth with so many interesting stories. 
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading


Annie_Barrows wrote:


Wrighty wrote:

 

I've saved all of our favorite children's books too so that my nieces and nephews can read them now and then someday my grandchildren will be able to. I still have some of my own favorites from when I was a kid!

 


Certain people who shall be nameless (clue: I'm married to him) keep trying to get me to throw out all the baby books, but I REFUSE. That's not a baby book, I say, that's an icon of our daughters' youth. He says how can it be an icon when the pages are stuck together? And I say that makes it a personalized icon. This argument has been going on for years. I'm winning. 

 


Don't give up the fight! I'll stand beside you all the way. I did have to thin out our books because we had a basket of them in every room besides the ones on bookshelves. I gave those to family and a kindergarden class but I still have a lot left. I saved the hardbacks, the autographed copies, the gifts and the favorites - even the sticky ones. Those are usually the ones that have been read and loved the most. The personalized icons.

Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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fun for kids


cobalt-blue wrote: 
Another great idea to keep my son interested in reading! I had to laugh at stocking your bathroom reading supply with SI and car magazines. My son has broadened his love of reading train books from "Thomas the Tank Engine" to hobby-store train magazines that a passionate train hobbyist gave him. Thank you for sharing those tidbits with me : )

 


You're very welcome! I've always appreciated getting tidbits from others too. That's a great idea with the train magazines and it's easy. My youngest was very passionate about big trucks, construction vehicles and tractors. He also loved magazines and ads that had those vehicles in them. He would carry them everywhere until they were tattered so we started cutting out his favorites and put them into a small photo album that he could carry around instead. Friends and neighbors knew his passion so he was lucky enough to get to ride in dump trucks, fire trucks, back hoes, etc. We would take photos and put those into his little album too. I still have that somewhere. Now that he is 15 he doesn't remember much of that so I'm glad we did it. He asked me once "I really knew the names of all of that stuff?" The children's librarian would even reserve any new books she thought he would like without us having to ask.

 

My favorite project was when I painted a cartoon mural of a construction site on his bedroom wall. I named the workers and the site after my kids and the license plates were their birthdays. We put all kinds of little personal items into it that were fun to search for. It was a bit painful to paint over but I took plenty of photos of him in front of it before we redecorated. You'll find all kinds of fun ways to enjoy your son's hobbies and interests and it doesn't have to be expensive either. Your whole family can have a great time doing it too!

Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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cookbooks


Sunltcloud wrote
Speaking of personalized icons - after I had known my husband-to-be for a few months (he was a serviceman in Germany and worked in our computer room) I wrote to his mother to send me a cookbook and let me know what he liked. She went through the whole "Sunset Cook Book of Favorite Recipes" (1962) and put check marks in the margins and for quite a few recipes she wrote her own version next to the printed textHe and I have been divorced for over 40 years but I would never get rid of the cookbook, even though it is in many pieces and must live in a plastic bag. Mother still makes her baked potatoes the way she described in the book, and at Christmas, when we all get together (my ex and I have remained good friends) I sometimes tell the story of the cookbook.

 

Annie, somewhere you described your attempt at potato pie. When I was a child we used to make potato pies (gloriefied potato pancakes that were often eaten cold the next day) and poured sugar beet syrup over them. Those beets are white and need to be slivered, boiled,pureed, pressed through a cloth and then the liquid is boiled down until it looks like honey.

 

During the war the farmer in back of our house grew poppies in the summer and beets and potatoes in the winter. My cousin and I were very creative in appropriating a beet or potato here or there. Of course my mother was much more agressive, especially after the French invasion;(liberationshe traveled by day, hiding in fields by night due to curfewtrading our silverware, dishes, linen, for a little butter or some dry milk. A lot of Germans hated farmers then, because they grew rich in possessions from our hunger.

 

I do remember crawling on my knees a whole day with my grandmother, digging up potatoes, and being paid with a loaf of bread and a few slices of bacon. Now bacon grease sandwiches are sold for two dollars at festivals, much like "soulfood" has become a specialty hereBacon grease was a staple of my school years and I still love it, but after my "coronary artery procedure" I have finally sworn off all animal fats.  

 

I also just saw a recipe for potatoes that are mashed together with red beets - two parts beets to one part potatoesto make a sweet pudding, maybe the consistency of rice pudding. I thought that this mash could then be fried to give it a crust.....never mind, I am on a very limited diet and often hallucinate.......  


Cookbooks and recipe cards are an heirloom themselves. What is so special is the handwriting and notes of the person who passed it on. We have a cookbook from my great-grandmother that is so fragile it's held together with rubberbands. I don't know if those treasures happen as much anymore with the internet and email although recipes will always be shared.

 

Sunltcloud, you should write your own book about the experiences of your childhoodYou have so much to share and it's fascinating to hear. I can't even imagine all that you endured.

Author
Annie_Barrows
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎08-14-2008
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Re: Recommended Reading


Sunltcloud wrote:

Annie_Barrows wrote: 

Certain people who shall be nameless (clue: I'm married to him) keep trying to get me to throw out all the baby books, but I REFUSE. That's not a baby book, I say, that's an icon of our daughters' youth. He says how can it be an icon when the pages are stuck together? And I say that makes it a personalized icon. This argument has been going on for years. I'm winning. 


Speaking of personalized icons - after I had known my husband-to-be for a few months (he was a serviceman in Germany and worked in our computer room) I wrote to his mother to send me a cookbook and let me know what he liked. She went through the whole "Sunset Cook Book of Favorite Recipes" (1962) and put check marks in the margins and for quite a few recipes she wrote her own version next to the printed text. He and I have been divorced for over 40 years but I would never get rid of the cookbook, even though it is in many pieces and must live in a plastic bag. Mother still makes her baked potatoes the way she described in the book, and at Christmas, when we all get together (my ex and I have remained good friends) I sometimes tell the story of the cookbook.

 

Annie, somewhere you described your attempt at potato pie. When I was a child we used to make potato pies (gloriefied potato pancakes that were often eaten cold the next day) and poured sugar beet syrup over them. Those beets are white and need to be slivered, boiled,pureed, pressed through a cloth and then the liquid is boiled down until it looks like honey.

 

During the war the farmer in back of our house grew poppies in the summer and beets and potatoes in the winter. My cousin and I were very creative in appropriating a beet or potato here or there. Of course my mother was much more agressive, especially after the French invasion;(liberation) she traveled by day, hiding in fields by night due to curfew, trading our silverware, dishes, linen, for a little butter or some dry milk. A lot of Germans hated farmers then, because they grew rich in possessions from our hunger.

 

I do remember crawling on my knees a whole day with my grandmother, digging up potatoes, and being paid with a loaf of bread and a few slices of bacon. Now bacon grease sandwiches are sold for two dollars at festivals, much like "soulfood" has become a specialty here. Bacon grease was a staple of my school years and I still love it, but after my "coronary artery procedure" I have finally sworn off all animal fats.  

 

I also just saw a recipe for potatoes that are mashed together with red beets - two parts beets to one part potatoes - to make a sweet pudding, maybe the consistency of rice pudding. I thought that this mash could then be fried to give it a crust.....never mind, I am on a very limited diet and often hallucinate.......  


I love your stories--and I admire all the women in your family for their tenacity and ingenuity. What a heritage you have!

 

Your recipe for potato-beet mash sounds substantially superior to the authentic potato peel pie. Frying is far too fuel-prodigal for a World War II recipe.  No, for an authentic experience, you must simply boil the potato and beet together for the shortest amount of time that will permit them to be mashed, and then dump the mash into a pan lined with uncooked potato peelings. You then cook it in the oven, again for the shortest amount of time possible, about fifteen minutes in my case.  It's very gluey and filling, but there's not much nutrition in there. I can't imagine that it's good for the arteries either. And believe me, it's not worth breaking your diet for.

 


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