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Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

Even though today is Bastille Day and we're learning Spanish, (Mon Dieu) I thought it appropriate to write a few more language learning tips.  Please read on.....

At the beginning of the language learning process, you must translate to a point.  Not every linguist will agree with me on this and they are certainly entitled to their opinion.

But the fact remains that  most language learners spend well over 50% of their time guessing at meanings instead of learning a new language.

For this reason, I have dedicated a good portion of my life to 'taking the foreign out of language' by providing immedate English equivalents to all exercises, both written and spoken.

In this fashion, the student's anxiety and stress levels fall and their confidence increases.

There is nothing to be gained by wasting your time looking up meanings instead of learning the target language.  I am quite firm in this opinion.

That said .... The time does and will come when you must wean yourself of any dependence you may have to your native tongue, let go of the side of the linguistic pool you are trying to swim in, and begin swimming.  This happens naturally with practice.

I like to say that 'repetition is the mother of fluency'.  It is literally impossible to learn to speak a language fluently without practice, trail and error, making and correcting lots of mistakes, and finally breaking into fluency.

In language learning, the opportunity to fail is also the opportunity to succeed.

In language learning, you literally 'succeed by failing'.  Each time failing a little less, like a child who toddles, falls, gets up, and eventually learns to walk.

You will become fluent, but you must allow yourself the opportunity to practice during your 'down times'.

In language learning, 'down time' is 'up time'.

Allow me to explain.

If you have good language audio (like Behind the Wheel for example) ready to go in your car stereo, then you no longer fear traffic jams, trains, red lights, etc ... because these all represent massive learning opportunities for you.

You use this otherwise 'lost time' to become fluent in another language.

You must repeat out loud.  I emphasize this.  Some people think they can get the harvest without planting the seeds, but it will not work.

The seeds of fluency lie in the day to day out loud repetition that you relentlessly do with your down time.

When you watch TV, do you switch the language to Spanish, or at least try to get Spanish subtitles for the movies you watch?

Do you listen to internet Spanish radio talk shows?  They're free and easy to access.

Do you listen to Spanish music on the radio?

Do you talk to yourself in Spanish?  Try it.  It's fun and it's vicarious practice.

Imagine you are in a Spanish speaking country and need directions.  What would you say?

Do this to yourself up front every single day.  In your minds eye, see yourself interacting with native speakers.  How would you say certain words?  If you don't know them, ask me now.

Then go to your language program, online dictionary, etc .. and find the words you need to put the sentences together.

One of the main strengths of the Behind the Wheel program is the rapid sentence building techniques. 

We'll be working on that soon.

Espero que esto te ayude.  (I hope that this helps you)

Buenas noches (Good Night) and Buena Suerte (Good Luck)

Mark Frobose

www.frobose.com

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awesomelyautumn
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

This really helps a ton! I feel i did not learn anything in my spanish classes at the community college because i was so busy trying to figure out what they mean, and TERRIFIED of tests because I just could not grasp the foundation! I am glad i have a learning tool. I have till spring to tighten my foundation before dipping into the spanish classroom for a grade pool. I have friends taking Spanish now and they have a test..they have been in for two days...so again thanks for this unique opportunity. I am glad i have good teaching aides!

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DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

Thank you for these tips, Mark. They are helpful.  :smileywink:

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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Anna_Louise
Posts: 238
Registered: ‎06-17-2009
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Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

[ Edited ]

Mark:

 

Thanks for all the tips.  I'm printing them and have a folder for them.  They are a great help! :smileyhappy:

Distinguished Correspondent
Bonnie_C
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎08-07-2009

Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

Hola Mark,

Again, thank you for the pep talks and the tips.  I will certainly benefit from both.

 

I have already started  to do a few of your suggestions.  I try and name as many household objects in Spanish as I can.  I have also attempted to listen to Spanish radio broadcast on satellite radio in the car.  I tuned in to ESPN in Spanish so I could at least know they were discussing sports.  I managed to pick up a report about béisbol.  I could pick out a few words, but the speed of the language left me in the dust.  Hopefully as I learn more words and phrases my ears will be able to keep up with the language.

 

Bonnie

Contributor
mollz20
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎06-02-2010

Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

At work I have been trying to repeat Spanish words and phrases when I hear people say them. I learn very well by repeating the word and memorizing the meanings. I have also been trying to to read more phrarses and Spanish labels when I'm out and about.

 

Buenas noches, Molly

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Bien Hecho - Well Done

Bien hecho Bonnie - Well done.

Mark

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Hola Molly/Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

Hola Molly,

Bien hecho.  Así se hace = Well done.  That's how it's done.

Keep up the good work.

Marcos

Correspondent
LadyMin
Posts: 51
Registered: ‎11-29-2009

Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

 


Mark_Frobose wrote:

Do you talk to yourself in Spanish?  Try it.  It's fun and it's vicarious practice.


 

I like that one! I really don't have anyone to practice with. I can "talk at" my husband but he doesn't reply. I'm still trying to get him to take the course with me.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

I have not been too successful in listening to Spanish with no idea of what is being said. It is just a stream of noise to me. I think you are right Mark, intitially you really need your own language as a crutch to get you going.

 

I don't watch TV but I do get movies from Netflix and buy some as well. I only watch Spanish language ones now -- no English at all. I haven't been super successful with the true Spanish language ones. They often talk too fast. But I am finding some excellent Spanish dubbed ones that work great. In fact I've been watching a lot of DreamWorks (PIxar) and Disney animation films that are just my speed. I watch them once with the English subtitles and then watch them again without. I have also been working my way in the same manner through the Everyone Loves Raymond TV series. The dubbing is excellent and the vocabulary more useful.

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Mark Responds - Sí Both Work Well

Buenas Noches Nadine,

I agree that both work quite well.

The important thing is that the input be 'comprehensible'.  You must be able to understand.

English subtitles achieve that goal wonderfully.

It's also helpful to have a movie playing in English with Spanish subtitles.  Spanish is a very phonetically accurate language, so it's quite easy to read.

I used to watch John Wayne in Ecuador many years back with Spanish subtitles.  What a riot.

And I learned lots of Spanish that way.  ( I even learned how to say 'saddle' - 'montura'.)

Qué pases una noche muy agradable.  (I hope you have/spend a nice evening)

Hasta mañana,

Marcos

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peg_loves_books
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Mark Frobose's Language Learning Tips of the Day - July 14th Bastille Day

muchas gracias por la tradución en ingles depues la oración en español. (thank you for the translation in english after the sentence in spanish). ¿Está bien dicho?

I really enjoy that as it helps me to put together short sentences/greetings.

Thank you for all your tips. I do need to do more saturation with spanish tv shows, radio and cd learning tapes.  I've been very lazy with that.

thank you!

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Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Mark Responds - Sí Both Work Well

Duh :smileytongue: ! Now why didn't I think of that! Spanish subtitles with English dialog. I've tried Spanish subtitles with Spanish dubbed movies and that doesn't work -- they don't match. And the original Spanish films rarely have Spanish subtitles or closed captions, which would work just fine. I'm going to try the Spanish subtitles tonight with English and see how it goes. Thanks!

 

 


Mark_Frobose wrote:

Buenas Noches Nadine,

I agree that both work quite well.

The important thing is that the input be 'comprehensible'.  You must be able to understand.

English subtitles achieve that goal wonderfully.

It's also helpful to have a movie playing in English with Spanish subtitles.  Spanish is a very phonetically accurate language, so it's quite easy to read.

I used to watch John Wayne in Ecuador many years back with Spanish subtitles.  What a riot.

And I learned lots of Spanish that way.  ( I even learned how to say 'saddle' - 'montura'.)

Qué pases una noche muy agradable.  (I hope you have/spend a nice evening)

Hasta mañana,

Marcos


 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Mark Responds - Sí Both Work Well

 

I tried the English with the Spanish subtitles. It really works great! It adds a whole new dimension to learning Spanish. It is actually easier for me to pick out the written Spanish words than to pick out the spoken ones. It isn't a substitute for hearing the Spanish. Just a way of coming at Spanish from a different angle. Now I get to watch a movie three times -- Spanish with English subtitles, English with Spanish subtitles and then Spanish by itself. Now I just wish I could get the Spanish with the Spanish subtitles that match.

Nadine wrote:

Duh :smileytongue: ! Now why didn't I think of that! Spanish subtitles with English dialog. I've tried Spanish subtitles with Spanish dubbed movies and that doesn't work -- they don't match. And the original Spanish films rarely have Spanish subtitles or closed captions, which would work just fine. I'm going to try the Spanish subtitles tonight with English and see how it goes. Thanks!

 

 


Mark_Frobose wrote:

Buenas Noches Nadine,

I agree that both work quite well.

The important thing is that the input be 'comprehensible'.  You must be able to understand.

English subtitles achieve that goal wonderfully.

It's also helpful to have a movie playing in English with Spanish subtitles.  Spanish is a very phonetically accurate language, so it's quite easy to read.

I used to watch John Wayne in Ecuador many years back with Spanish subtitles.  What a riot.

And I learned lots of Spanish that way.  ( I even learned how to say 'saddle' - 'montura'.)

Qué pases una noche muy agradable.  (I hope you have/spend a nice evening)

Hasta mañana,

Marcos


 

 


 

 

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