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Kristin_Z
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Questions for Mark Frobose

Hi, everyone! Our Behind the Wheel Spanish class is finally beginning! Please post any questions you have for Mark right here!

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gdawson
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

I'm a bit confused about the schedule.  Should we be using/listening to particular parts of the materials for this week?  I can't seem to find any directions for what we should be doing exactly.

 

Thanks for the help!

 

Gwen

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veggiegrl
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Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

I am also confused as to how this course is going to work.  I saw the schedule, but I am uncertain as to what I should be doing.

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Mark_Frobose
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Response/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hi Gwen,

Thanks for the question.

The syllabus is actually quite flexible.  Ask your questions and I'll be happy to answer them.

Mark

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Mark_Frobose
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Response/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hola Veggie Girl,

I'm going to work with questions first to determine where you are and what you wish to learn.

We can take it from there.

Have you had any Spanish before?

Please let me know.

Mark

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SueWho
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Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hi, Mark.  Thanks so much for taking the time to teach us.  I was wondering what hours of the day and days of the week you plan to be actively available on the BTW Spanish message boards. 

So says SueWho, another obsessive-compulsive bibliophile
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

 


veggiegrl wrote:

I am also confused as to how this course is going to work.  I saw the schedule, but I am uncertain as to what I should be doing.


 

I am also uncertain how the text and CD are supposed to fit in. I have been through both already but only in a general way. Should we just do two lessons and CDs each week as a backgrounder?I

 

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Mark_Frobose
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Todos los Días/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hola again,

I'll be checking in every day.

I would recommend reviewing the book and CDs and beginning by coming  up with a few questions.

We'll take it from there.

Mark

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Bonnie_C
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Registered: ‎08-07-2009
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hola Mark,

 

Me llamo Bonnie.  I have always wanted to learn another language and what a fun way to do it.  Thank you for this opportunity and your time. 

 

I do have a question for you.  In the materials there are sections listing the members of the family  (la familia).  How do you refer to someone who is related to you by marriage?

 

Gracias,

 

Bonnie

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Mark_Frobose
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Yes/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hola Bonnie,

So nice to have you 'a bordo' or 'on board'.

There is a family section in the book, but for now, you may refer to your mother-in-law as your

'suegra' and your father-in-law as your 'suegro'.

Your brother or sister-in-law is either your 'cuñado' or your 'cuñada'.

Please let me know if this answers your questions.

Un fuerte abrazo,

Marcos

 
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2010bc
Posts: 41
Registered: ‎02-24-2010
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hi Mark--

 

This is so fun!  Me gusta estudiar el español.

 

I seem to remember that there is a term for the relationship between the parents of two people who are married--that is, what would I call my son's wife's mother.  I know we have no such term in English, but I'm pretty sure there is one in Spanish.  Thanks.

 

--Bev

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mollz20
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Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hello Mark,


I haven't had any formal Spanish classes since 9th grade and I graduated in 2008. I am going to start college level Spanish 1 this fall at NWTC here in Wisconsin. I read the introduction section in the book and enjoyed pronouncing the "fun spanish sayings" on page xiii.

 

How do you say, "are you here to pay your bill?" A few ladies at work are wondering.

 

Buenas noches,

Molly

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Mark_Frobose
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"Are you here to pay your bill?" = ¿Estás aquí para pagar la cuenta?

Muchas gracias por la pregunta = Many thanks for the question.

Here's the answer:

 "Are you here to pay your bill?" = ¿Estás aquí para pagar la cuenta?

Please bear in mind that 'Estás' is the familiar form of 'Are you'.

The formal form would be 'Está'.

Please keep the questions flowing.  And hasta pronto = Until soon

Mark Frobose

 

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Mark_Frobose
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A mí me gusta enseñar = I like to teach/Matrimonio

Gracias por la pregunta = Thanks for the question

The word for the relationship of marriage is 'el matrimonio'.  

The very act of getting married is called 'la boda'.

Hasta pronto = Until soon

Marcos

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awesomelyautumn
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Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Por Que?= Why

porque=because

 

so instead of the accent mark making a difference it is spacing as well? or is this rare?

 

also there are words like como and que that can mean a whole slew of things. So, you go by context right? but this makes it hard to read a sentence because A) i am not familar enough with spanish to not have to look up what the words mean,and B) because sentence structure is a lot different then with english sentence structure.

So, how do i know what to use? is there a rule of thumb to go by?

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Mark_Frobose
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Great Questions/Respuestas - Answers/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Hola Awesomely Autumn,


Tus preguntas son excelentes.  Your questions are excellent.

First of all .... Why? is  'Por qué'  always two separate words with an accent on the é of qué

'Because' is always one word - porque

 Your question concerning 'como' also intrigues me.  You are again correct in stating that it has many meanings.  As English speakers we must avoid the temptation to search for total word-for- word 'equivalency' when learning Spanish or any other language for that matter.
Sometimes you'll have five words in Spanish for one word in English and vice-versa.  That's just how it is.
Sentence structure is often referred to as 'syntax' or word order.
Syntax (word order) can dramatically impact the meaning of a word within a sentence.
¿Cómo? can politely be used to say 'What?' when you didn't hear someone the first time.
¿Qué? means 'What' but is quite familiar and strong as a response and should be avoided with strangers and persons of respect.
'Como' may be used to mean 'how'.  ¿Cómo lo hago?  'How do I do it?'
"Cómo te va?" = How are you doing?  
"¿Cómo te ha ido?"  'How have you been?'  informal.  (literally:  How has it gone for you?)
As a general rule of thumb, try to avoid direct word-for-word translations and seek the equivalency of 'meaning' instead.
In English, 'I'd just as soon go." means "I'd rather go."  Try explaining this word-for-word to a non English speaking person.  It's better to simply say "I'd rather go" is the same as "I'd just as soon go" and so forth, without explaining the confusing details.  I think you get the picture.
Great questions.  Keep asking.  I'm here to serve.
Hasta pronto,
Mark Frobose

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Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Yes/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

 


Mark_Frobose wrote:

Hola Bonnie,

So nice to have you 'a bordo' or 'on board'.

There is a family section in the book, but for now, you may refer to your mother-in-law as your

'suegra' and your father-in-law as your 'suegro'.

Your brother or sister-in-law is either your 'cuñado' or your 'cuñada'.

Please let me know if this answers your questions.

Un fuerte abrazo,

Marcos

 

 

I haven't found the the family section in the Level 1 Express book, but maybe I just haven't come across it yet. But there is a family section in the excellent Reference section of the Level 2 book.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

With all the languages you know, do you ever start mixing them up so you end up talking in mixed languages?

 

In conversations I've had with people who are bilingual, they say you can't translate, you have to just respond natually. I'm not sure what they mean or how you get to that point. Right now, I can only translate and V-E-R-Y slowly. And I'm totally lost when I hear Spanish spoken. I'm trying to figure out the meaning of some of the words that sound familiar and by then they are off on another topic. Is there a trick to making the language so much your own that you can understand and speak without thinking?

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Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010

Musings and Comments About Translating/Thinking in Another Language/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Buenas Noches Nadine,

A truly thought provoking question that deserves a reasonably clear answer.

At the beginning of language learning, you must translate to a point.  Not every linguist will agree with me on this and they are certainly entitled to their opinion.

But the fact remains that  most language learners spend well over 50% of their time guessing at meanings instead of learning a new language.

For this reason, I have dedicated a good portion of my life to 'taking the foreign out of language' by providing immedate English equivalents to all exercises, both written and spoken.

In this fashion, the student's anxiety and stress levels fall and their confidence increases.

There is nothing to be gained by wasting your time looking up meanings instead of learning the target language.  I am quite firm in this opinion.

That said .... The time does and will come when you must wean yourself of any dependence you may have to your native tongue, let go of the side of the linguistic pool you are trying to swim in, and begin swimming.  This happens naturally with practice.

I like to say that 'repetition is the mother of fluency'.  It is literally impossible to learn to speak a language fluently without practice, trail and error, making and correcting lots of mistakes, and finally breaking into fluency.

In language learning, the opportunity to fail is also the opportunity to success.

In language learning, you literally 'succeed by failing'.  Each time failing a little less, like a child who toddles, falls, gets up, and eventually learns to walk.

You will become fluent, but you must allow yourself the opportunity to practice during your 'down times'.

In language learning, 'down time' is 'up time'.

Allow me to explain.

If you have good language audio (like Behind the Wheel for example) ready to go in your car stereo, then you no longer fear traffic jams, trains, red lights, etc ... because these all represent massive learning opportunities for you.

You use this otherwise 'lost time' to become fluent in another language.

You must repeat out loud.  I emphasize this.  Some people think they can get the harvest without planting the seeds, but it will not work.

The seeds of fluency lie in the day to day out loud repetition that you relentlessly do with your down time.

When you watch TV, do you switch the language to Spanish, or at least try to get Spanish subtitles for the movies you watch?

Do you listen to internet Spanish radio talk shows?  They're free and easy to access.

Do you listen to Spanish music on the radio?

Do you talk to yourself in Spanish?  Try it.  It's fun and it's vicarious practice.

Imagine you are in a Spanish speaking country and need directions.  What would you say?

Do this to yourself up front every single day.  In your minds eye, see yourself interacting with native speakers.  How would you say certain words?  If you don't know them, ask me now.

Then go to your language program, online dictionary, etc .. and find the words you need to put the sentences together.

One of the main strengths of the Behind the Wheel program is the rapid sentence building techniques. 

We'll be working on that soon.

Espero que esto te ayude.  (I hope that this helps you)

Buenas noches (Good Night) and Buena Suerte (Good Luck)

Mark Frobose

www.frobose.com

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alexalgebra
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

¡Hola Mark!

 

Sábado, fui a un orientación de voluntarios a un organización de español.  Hay clases de español y inglés, y lecciónes privadas.  Estaré ayudando con estas lecciónes para estudiantes de inglés.  ¡También, quiero practicar mi español con los estudiantes, por supuesto!  Los lecciónes estan dos horas - la primera hora y media estan en inglés y la última mediahora está en español.

 

Tengo algunas preguntas.

 

1. ¿Cómo se dice, "excited" en español?  La palabra correcta es "emocionado", ¿verdad?  Si la es correcta, ¿cómo se dice "emotional"?  ¿Sensitivo?  ¿Emocional?  (Hice un error una vez - dije "excitado" a un hombre en Costa Rica - "Oh!  Estoy muy excitado a ver el bosque y los animales!"  LOL!  No corrigiólome también...I wondered why he was laughing so hard!  LOL

 

2. Puedes explicarme las diferencias entre por y para, ¿por favor?  No las recuerdo. :smileytongue:

 

¡También, corrigeme por favor!  I'm so rusty!

 

- Alex