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SueWho
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Masculine versus feminine nouns

Mark,

 

I know that in Spanish, nouns are either masculine or feminine.  Are there any nouns which change depending upon the gender of the person to whom they apply?  For instance, you sign your posts "Tu maestro" (your teacher).  Would a female teacher be a "maestra"?

So says SueWho, another obsessive-compulsive bibliophile
New User
alexalgebra
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Masculine versus feminine nouns

 


SueWho wrote:

Mark,

 

I know that in Spanish, nouns are either masculine or feminine.  Are there any nouns which change depending upon the gender of the person to whom they apply?  For instance, you sign your posts "Tu maestro" (your teacher).  Would a female teacher be a "maestra"?


 

I'm not Mark, but the answer is yes :smileyhappy:  Not always, but el maestro/la maestra is one, or el profesor/la profesora, el doctor/la doctora, etc.  Ones that end in -ista are the same for m/f such as el/la periodista (journalist).

 

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Respuestas Para Alex de Parte de Mark el Maestro

Hola Alex,

Here goes.

First of all  .... a few corrections ... then on to your questions. 

fui a una orientación (fem.)

Las lecciones - feminine plural

español e inglés (e takes the place of y before a vowel or vowel sound)

Las lecciones duran dos horas = The lessons last two hours

Now ... on to your 'preguntas'

1. You are correct in stating that the best translation for 'excited' is emocionado(a).  'Exitado(a)' does have a sexual connotation.  Therefore it is not a good thing to say that you are 'exitado' about seeing the animals.  'Emocionado' works much better.

Sensitive in Spanish is 'sensible'. 

Emotional would be 'emotivo(a)' or 'emocional'

'por' means 'for' or 'because of' something or someone

Por tí = Because of you  'Por tí estoy aquí'  Because of you, I'm here.  This can be either positive or negative, depending upon the context.

Para - For or in order to.  "Para aprender bien hay que estudiar'.  In order to learn well, it's necessary to study. 

There have been books written on the differences between the two, but this gives you the gist of it I hope.

Hasta Pronto,

Mark Frobose

www.frobose.com

 

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose


alexalgebra wrote:

¡Hola Mark!

 

Sábado, fui a un orientación de voluntarios a un organización de español.  Hay clases de español y inglés, y lecciónes privadas.  Estaré ayudando con estas lecciónes para estudiantes de inglés.  ¡También, quiero practicar mi español con los estudiantes, por supuesto!  Los lecciónes estan dos horas - la primera hora y media estan en inglés y la última mediahora está en español.

 

Tengo algunas preguntas.

 

1. ¿Cómo se dice, "excited" en español?  La palabra correcta es "emocionado", ¿verdad?  Si la es correcta, ¿cómo se dice "emotional"?  ¿Sensitivo?  ¿Emocional?  (Hice un error una vez - dije "excitado" a un hombre en Costa Rica - "Oh!  Estoy muy excitado a ver el bosque y los animales!"  LOL!  No corrigiólome también...I wondered why he was laughing so hard!  LOL

 

2. Puedes explicarme las diferencias entre por y para, ¿por favor?  No las recuerdo. :smileytongue:

 

¡También, corrigeme por favor!  I'm so rusty!

 

- Alex


:smileyvery-happy: Alex, your story reminds me of one that I was told by a girl that had been an exchange student in South America.  Since one would have to understand Spanish, I don't get the chance to tell it very often, so I think I will do that here and now!  As you will see, there are two words that she got wrong!  I hope some people here will be able to understand!

 

It seems that a friend of this girl, also an exchange student, was living with a family, and was hungry, so she told her 'mother', "Ay, mamá, ¡tengo un hombre muy feroz!"  Naturally, the woman looked a bit shocked, and the girl, realizing her mistake, said, "Lo siento, me equivoqué.  ¡Estoy muy embarazada!"  Of course, this only made matters worse! :smileyvery-happy:

 

BTW, I am not sure exactly why, but generally you are not supposed to start a sentence with "también".  In that case, it is more proper to use "además".  (Sorry to butt in!)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Bibliophile
Nadine
Posts: 2,456
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: Musings and Comments About Translating/Thinking in Another Language/Re: Questions for Mark Frobo

[ Edited ]

 

Wow! What a great and complete answer to my question. Thanks Mark. I totally agree with what you have said. I think the biggest hurtle is to actually let go of the "side of the linguistic pool" and actually start talking.

Mark_Frobose wrote:

Buenas Noches Nadine,

A truly thought provoking question that deserves a reasonably clear answer.

At the beginning of language learning, you must translate to a point.  Not every linguist will agree with me on this and they are certainly entitled to their opinion.

But the fact remains that  most language learners spend well over 50% of their time guessing at meanings instead of learning a new language.

For this reason, I have dedicated a good portion of my life to 'taking the foreign out of language' by providing immedate English equivalents to all exercises, both written and spoken.

In this fashion, the student's anxiety and stress levels fall and their confidence increases.

There is nothing to be gained by wasting your time looking up meanings instead of learning the target language.  I am quite firm in this opinion.

That said .... The time does and will come when you must wean yourself of any dependence you may have to your native tongue, let go of the side of the linguistic pool you are trying to swim in, and begin swimming.  This happens naturally with practice.

I like to say that 'repetition is the mother of fluency'.  It is literally impossible to learn to speak a language fluently without practice, trail and error, making and correcting lots of mistakes, and finally breaking into fluency.

In language learning, the opportunity to fail is also the opportunity to success.

In language learning, you literally 'succeed by failing'.  Each time failing a little less, like a child who toddles, falls, gets up, and eventually learns to walk.

You will become fluent, but you must allow yourself the opportunity to practice during your 'down times'.

In language learning, 'down time' is 'up time'.

Allow me to explain.

If you have good language audio (like Behind the Wheel for example) ready to go in your car stereo, then you no longer fear traffic jams, trains, red lights, etc ... because these all represent massive learning opportunities for you.

You use this otherwise 'lost time' to become fluent in another language.

You must repeat out loud.  I emphasize this.  Some people think they can get the harvest without planting the seeds, but it will not work.

The seeds of fluency lie in the day to day out loud repetition that you relentlessly do with your down time.

When you watch TV, do you switch the language to Spanish, or at least try to get Spanish subtitles for the movies you watch?

Do you listen to internet Spanish radio talk shows?  They're free and easy to access.

Do you listen to Spanish music on the radio?

Do you talk to yourself in Spanish?  Try it.  It's fun and it's vicarious practice.

Imagine you are in a Spanish speaking country and need directions.  What would you say?

Do this to yourself up front every single day.  In your minds eye, see yourself interacting with native speakers.  How would you say certain words?  If you don't know them, ask me now.

Then go to your language program, online dictionary, etc .. and find the words you need to put the sentences together.

One of the main strengths of the Behind the Wheel program is the rapid sentence building techniques. 

We'll be working on that soon.

Espero que esto te ayude.  (I hope that this helps you)

Buenas noches (Good Night) and Buena Suerte (Good Luck)

Mark Frobose

www.frobose.com


 

 

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alexalgebra
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-02-2010
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Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

 


dulcinea3 wrote:
:smileyvery-happy: Alex, your story reminds me of one that I was told by a girl that had been an exchange student in South America.  Since one would have to understand Spanish, I don't get the chance to tell it very often, so I think I will do that here and now!  As you will see, there are two words that she got wrong!  I hope some people here will be able to understand!

 

It seems that a friend of this girl, also an exchange student, was living with a family, and was hungry, so she told her 'mother', "Ay, mamá, ¡tengo un hombre muy feroz!"  Naturally, the woman looked a bit shocked, and the girl, realizing her mistake, said, "Lo siento, me equivoqué.  ¡Estoy muy embarazada!"  Of course, this only made matters worse! :smileyvery-happy:

 

BTW, I am not sure exactly why, but generally you are not supposed to start a sentence with "también".  In that case, it is more proper to use "además".  (Sorry to butt in!)


 

 

LOL!  Yeah, you always hear those stories, but when it happened to me, hahaha.  That's a good one though - two for one! :smileywink:  Also, thanks for the tip :smileyhappy:

 

 

And Mark - gracias!!!!  That was very helpful.  Just found out I might have a job where I have to speak Spanish half the time so I gotta study hard!!

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Mark Frobose Responds/Re: Masculine versus feminine nouns

Hola Sue Who,

Excelente pregunta alumna mía = Excellent question my student (fem.)

The rule of thumb is this.  If the noun ends in 'o' then it's masculine and you use either 'el' for 'the'

or 'un' for 'a'.

If the noun ends in an 'a' then it's usually feminine and you use either 'la' for 'the' or 'una' for 'a' .

There are many exceptions, but this general rule covers 90% of your gender worries.

Agua is Spanish for water.  However, you must say 'el agua' because of the vowel collision.

'The water is cold' would be 'El agua está fría'.  Note that the ending of 'cold' which is 'fría' is feminine.

The picture is often referred to as 'la foto'.  This is because it is taken from 'la fotografía' and was shortened.

I hope this helps.

Marcos

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Hay Que Estudiar/Re: Questions for Mark Frobose

Querida Alexalgebra,

Hay que estudiar = You have to study

Hay que estudiar para aprender = You have to study in order to learn

Hay que estudiar para aprender español - You have to study in order to learn Spanish.

Buena suerte con tu trabajo = Good luck with your job.

Any more Spanish questions???

Marcos

Author
Mark_Frobose
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎05-26-2010
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Mark Comments on False Cognates/'Embarazada and Constipado'

Saludos Estimados Alumnos,

Greeting Esteemed Students,

I just wanted to mention false cognates.  A cognate is a foreign word that is similar to a word in your native language.

A false cognate is a word that looks and sounds like a word in your native language, but has a different meaning.

Two examples of false cognates that embarrassed me.

I once told a group of Colombian students that I was 'pregnant', thinking that 'embarazado' meant

'embarrassed'.  It doesn't of course.  It means to be with child.  What laughter ensued.

The correct word for embarrassed is 'avergonzado(a)' .  You could simply say 'Tengo vergüenza' for

'I'm ashamed'.  'Vergüenza' is actually a big important word in Spanish.

A second example of a false cognate is 'constipado(a)'.  In Spanish 'Constipado(a)' means to

have a stuffy nose. 

How about that?

¿Qué les parece?

Your comments and stories are always welcome.

Marcos

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