Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Frequent Contributor
Daniel_B
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Community Room

Although just about everything relates to book collecting in one way or another, I created this community room for fellow collectors to discuss issues that seem off topic and to use as an all-purpose discussion area.
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foxycat
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Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]
I'd like to hear from collectors on whether internet resources have greatly changed their collecting. Are you finding rare books on the web or do you still enjoy hunting in person?

I'm not a collector, but a computer techie, and I'm always interested in hearing how the web is changing our lives.

Message Edited by foxycat on 06-24-2007 01:57 AM
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

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Nelsmom
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Re: Community Room

Rochelle,

I hunt in used book stores but if I can't find what I am looking for I'm glad to have online places I can look. I don't know that I go for really rare books but some of the ones I have gotten have been out of print for quite a while.

Toni
Toni L. Chapman
Everyone needs some Tender Loving Care
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foxycat
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Re: Community Room

OK, I edit my query to include out-of-print books.
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
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Re: Community Room



foxycat wrote:
I'd like to hear from collectors on whether internet resources have greatly changed their collecting. Are you finding rare books on the web or do you still enjoy hunting in person?

Since moving to an island 30 years ago, I haven't had the luxury of hunting in person that I had when I lived in and around NYC.

Before the internet, I had a wonderful little bookstore in London that found me virtually anything I wanted; all it took was an airmail letter and a wait of a few weeks. When they closed down, I was bereft until the internet came along. Now I do virtually all my searching on the internet, and have been able to find almost everything I want quickly and conveniently. (Though I'm still waiting for a copy of Asimov's Annotated Paradise Lost to show up for a reasonable price; the only ones I can find are priced between $350 and $650, which IMO is absurd for a book I just want to buy to read, not to collect.)
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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foxycat
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Re: Community Room

Looks like you would be "collecting" it unintentionally :smileyvery-happy:. Have you tried Google's digital book service? You could at least read a selection. They call it a snippet.
http://books.google.com/bkshp?tab=wp

And are you familiar with their digital book project? It's quite amazing.


Everyman wrote:
(Though I'm still waiting for a copy of Asimov's Annotated Paradise Lost to show up for a reasonable price; the only ones I can find are priced between $350 and $650, which IMO is absurd for a book I just want to buy to read, not to collect.)

Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

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Everyman
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Re: Community Room

I borrow it on interlibrary loan when I need it -- am always tempted to "lose" it and pay the $25 for a lost book, but I always wind up being honest and returning it.

I am vaguely aware of Google's digital library, but haven't spent any real time there. Maybe I should.

foxycat wrote:
Looks like you would be "collecting" it unintentionally :smileyvery-happy:. Have you tried Google's digital book service? You could at least read a selection. They call it a snippet.
http://books.google.com/bkshp?tab=wp

And are you familiar with their digital book project? It's quite amazing.


Everyman wrote:
(Though I'm still waiting for a copy of Asimov's Annotated Paradise Lost to show up for a reasonable price; the only ones I can find are priced between $350 and $650, which IMO is absurd for a book I just want to buy to read, not to collect.)




_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Laurel
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Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Community Room

The library my library got it from through ILL charges $150.00 if you lose that book. I ended up sending it back rather quickly, because it does not have line numbers and I like the Hughes/Kastan notes better than Asimov's.

I guess the publishers don't want to risk printing too many copies of a book like that that because the text is of interest to mostly universities but the notes are not done by a scholar in the field. One of similar price range that i would really like to get hold of is the works of George Herbert with Helen Vender's notes.



Everyman wrote:
I borrow it on interlibrary loan when I need it -- am always tempted to "lose" it and pay the $25 for a lost book, but I always wind up being honest and returning it.

I am vaguely aware of Google's digital library, but haven't spent any real time there. Maybe I should.

foxycat wrote:
Looks like you would be "collecting" it unintentionally :smileyvery-happy:. Have you tried Google's digital book service? You could at least read a selection. They call it a snippet.
http://books.google.com/bkshp?tab=wp

And are you familiar with their digital book project? It's quite amazing.


Everyman wrote:
(Though I'm still waiting for a copy of Asimov's Annotated Paradise Lost to show up for a reasonable price; the only ones I can find are priced between $350 and $650, which IMO is absurd for a book I just want to buy to read, not to collect.)







"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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foxycat
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Re: Google's Digital Book Project

Google is planning to digitize every book ever published. The idea is that since a search engine has access to knowledge, the knowledge in books must be included. They've been going to major libraries and digitizing the books for the website. The project has caused a great deal of controversy regarding copyrights. Books still under copyright have only an excerpt, called "Limited previews," digitized.

What you're looking at is a photo of each page, so they're not always clear. This isn't the same as projects like bartleby.com and gutenberg.com, which give you a plain-text download of the book. On the other hand, the number of such e-texts online is more limited than Google's project.






Everyman wrote:
I am vaguely aware of Google's digital library, but haven't spent any real time there. Maybe I should.
Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. --Oscar Wilde

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becke_davis
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Re: Community Room

Your comments remind me of Helene Hanff's wonderful book "84 Charing Cross Road." The book is my favorite but the movie isn't bad, either.

I know there were some great used book stores on Cecil Court and on Long Acre (Covent Garden) in London, plus the "new" stores like Foyle's and what was the one by Piccadilly, Hatchard's I think.

Besides ebay, I sometimes look at Alibris online for rare books, but you can't beat the fun of digging through old books in a neat old bookstore!
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Wildflower
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Registered: ‎12-31-2006
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Re: Community Room



becke_davis wrote:
you can't beat the fun of digging through old books in a neat old bookstore!




I completely agree, but unfortunately there are very few neat old bookstores around anymore.
"It's never to late to be what you might have been" -George Eliot
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Choisya
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Re: Community Room : Daniel: Rare Harry Potter editions.

Hello Daniel - I am Choisya from Over the Pond!

A student over here has just auctioned a hardback copy of a rare edition of The Philosopher's Stone by J K Rowlings for £7200/$14300 and there has been a lot of speculation about values amongst my young grandchildren, all of whom own first editions and are already planning exotic holidays!:smileysurprised: I wonder if you could give a guide to the value of such editions, especially as there is a strong HP club here. Also, is there a difference in value between th UK editions and the US ones?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/somerset/6227616.stm
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LuvReading
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Re: Community Room



Everyman wrote:


foxycat wrote:
I'd like to hear from collectors on whether internet resources have greatly changed their collecting. Are you finding rare books on the web or do you still enjoy hunting in person?

Since moving to an island 30 years ago, I haven't had the luxury of hunting in person that I had when I lived in and around NYC.

Before the internet, I had a wonderful little bookstore in London that found me virtually anything I wanted; all it took was an airmail letter and a wait of a few weeks. When they closed down, I was bereft until the internet came along. Now I do virtually all my searching on the internet, and have been able to find almost everything I want quickly and conveniently. (Though I'm still waiting for a copy of Asimov's Annotated Paradise Lost to show up for a reasonable price; the only ones I can find are priced between $350 and $650, which IMO is absurd for a book I just want to buy to read, not to collect.)





Everyman,

I've been collecting books for quite awhile now and I find that http://www.bookfinder.com is a great resource. It allows you to search for books by title, author and other criteria, then returns results that include several booksellers online. You may check there to find your Asimov book, chances are, you may find a damaged/uncollectible copy for reading - I've often seen reading copies when looking for books for my collection.

Tammie
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Daniel_B
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Re: Community Room : Daniel: Rare Harry Potter editions.



Choisya wrote:
Hello Daniel - I am Choisya from Over the Pond!

A student over here has just auctioned a hardback copy of a rare edition of The Philosopher's Stone by J K Rowlings for £7200/$14300 and there has been a lot of speculation about values amongst my young grandchildren, all of whom own first editions and are already planning exotic holidays!:smileysurprised: I wonder if you could give a guide to the value of such editions, especially as there is a strong HP club here. Also, is there a difference in value between th UK editions and the US ones?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/somerset/6227616.stm




Hello Choisya, thanks for bringing this up. You're absolutely right -- a first printing of the UK edition of the first Harry Potter did sell for that amount recently. This is an incredible fact, considering how recently the book was published. Remember collectors: your next purchase could be the next Harry Potter.

There is a strong market for rare Harry Potter books right now. I am not an expert on all of the many many editions, but I know a thing or two and am happy to share. The UK hardcover first editions are generally the most valuable and collectible Harry Potter books. In the case of the first book at least, the UK edition was issued first so it takes priority over the US edition. I think that later editions were issued simultaneously in both countries, but since Rowling is British the UK editions are considered the real originals. (US first trade editions of the early books are still worth quite a lot). The books have been issued in larger and larger print runs (the first print one of the last book was truly enormous, possibly the largest single printing of any book ever). Meaning that of course that the more recent books are less valuable. But any first printing of any Potter book in US or UK edition is worth holding on to. The later printings are much less valuable than the firsts, although in the case of the first volume, a second printing could still be worth several hundred dollars I would imagine.

As I recall, the real difficulty is that some of the first printings appeared in several states -- meaning there were slight differences between earlier and later copies of the books within the individual print runs. Missing punctuation on the dust flap, etc, is used to establish priority. I believe that one of the most notorious points in the first printing of the Philosopher's Stone involves a mis-spelling of the author's name. So before you start planning your vacation, you should make sure that you have a true first printing in your hands. Unfortunately I can't tell you all of the points -- I recommend a google search if you're interested, or if you tell me which title you have and whether it's UK or US I could look it up (as long as everyone doesn't ask!). If your book has a number row on the copyright page and the number "1" isn't present, then it definitely is NOT a first printing (i.e. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9). But it's possible that the early books don't have number rows at all (which doesn't mean anything). Also don't trust a "first edition" statement on the copy right page. If you read my "first edition" posts, you know that not all "first editions" are real first editions - the publisher could apply that term to the 100th printing of the first edition, which isn't worth more than the cover price.

I know less about the fancy limited editions, but I believe there are some Potter deluxe editions that are valuable.

And needless to say, anything signed by J.K. Rowling is worth its weight in gold.
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Borg
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Registered: ‎02-10-2007
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Re: Community Room

I enjoy hunting in person the most, but recently I did enjoy buying online. I have found that most of my favorite authors have there own web sites. You can go to there web sites and find all kinds of stuff on them. At a recent site of one of my favorite authors, he sent me to an small publishing company that publishes his books. I bought a first edition of one of his books and for the first time, I bought a Signed and numbered chap book from him. I had never even known before about chap books or how one buys signed and numbered editions.

Thanks
Borg
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Everyman
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Re: Community Room

Okay, what's a chap book?

Borg wrote:
I enjoy hunting in person the most, but recently I did enjoy buying online. I have found that most of my favorite authors have there own web sites. You can go to there web sites and find all kinds of stuff on them. At a recent site of one of my favorite authors, he sent me to an small publishing company that publishes his books. I bought a first edition of one of his books and for the first time, I bought a Signed and numbered chap book from him. I had never even known before about chap books or how one buys signed and numbered editions.

Thanks


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Daniel_B
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Re: Community Room


Everyman wrote:
Okay, what's a chap book?


Chapbooks are pamphlets -- usually with paper covers and stapled bindings these days. It's a popular form for privately printed poetry.

The term originally referred to sensational, moral, or pedagogical literature printed in pamphlet form and distributed by hawkers or "chapmen" -- not real booksellers. (My source on that is John Carter's "ABC For Book Collectors".)
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Frogee
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Registered: ‎08-24-2007
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Re: Community Room

I recently purchased a sealed book which was 'Journey to Beloved', it was allegedly flat-signed by Oprah Winfrey.

I debated with myself for a bit as to whether I would break the seal, given that it had very official looking stickers saying only 1000 were printed.

Well I broke the seal. This is what I found: A book, with a thick front page which clearly wasn't made with the book. It appears to have been inserted at some later stage. Well done though, I must say. The signature was not Oprah Winfrey's. It was not flat-signed. The signature was very suspect because I recalled seeing Oprah's signature before. Oprah's, 'O' starts at the top, this one started at the bottom.

So, I guess the seller thought well their are a thousand suckers out there. They won't break the seal. If they do, I'll be long gone. Yes, the seller was right. It was about 6 months before I broke the seal. I am now out of pocket $200US.

The US seller is still selling authenticated books. It's quite a large business or at least gives that impression. I guess I'm unable to tell you who the seller is. Just be alert, is all I'm saying. Frogee
Only Puddles Not People Should be Shallow
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cmprofessor
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Room

Tammie:

I agree with you that bookfinder is a great site. I've also used Abebooks.com and have had good luck with it.

Using the Internet, I've found many book sellers online. I ask to be put on their catalog distribution list. I've kept them all and they help me track the going prices for the types of books I like to collect (mysteries, mainly), over time.

It seems that many posts noted the decreasing number of used bookstores these days. Recently, I traveled to New York city and visited the Strand bookstore. It was huge (they advertise 18 miles of shelving) and I found several books I had been looking for. Someday, I hope to travel to Wales (Hay-on-Wye) for their book festival.

Mike
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