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We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Contributor
cmprofessor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Robin: there's another book by Basbanes you may enjoy: Patience & Fortitude. It's about great libraries.

Mike
BN Editor
skanga2001
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎08-07-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi,

I'm interested in collecting first editions of the British publisher Faber & Faber from the 1930s to the 1950s - primarily for their book jacket art. Also, Herge's Adventures of Tintin first editions, either published by Casterman (French language) or Methuen (English language). Anyone know of good places in the US to find these?

Mike S
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

I have a lot of French language Tintins, but not first editions. Asterix, too. They're a great way to practice reading French.

skanga2001 wrote:
Hi,

I'm interested in collecting first editions of the British publisher Faber & Faber from the 1930s to the 1950s - primarily for their book jacket art. Also, Herge's Adventures of Tintin first editions, either published by Casterman (French language) or Methuen (English language). Anyone know of good places in the US to find these?

Mike S


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Frequent Contributor
thinker
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎08-17-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi

I'm currently into collecting classics, but i'm also looking for anything along the lines of science i'm considering starting another collection there, got to get me some additional shelving space though!!
Thinker
Contributor
SamHouston
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎11-10-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hello everyone.

I've been a book collector since the seventies and I found myself drawn to first editions in the early eighties. I have about 1200 books on the shelves in my study and my biggest problem these days is deciding which ones get to remain on the shelves and which have to be relegated to the closets for storage. It's a constant battle and it keeps me busy.

I have to admit that I was a bit of a "book speculator" for a while and that I sometimes bought up a stack of first editions that I found on the bargain tables of bookstores. For instance, I bought about a dozen first edition copies of Toni Morrison's "Beloved" before she won the big prize for it. Those copies have gone up in value and I've been able to take them to book shows and trade them for other books that I want to add to my own collection, so it's been worth the "risk." But I don't do much of that these days.

Anyway, just wanted to say hello and that I find this part of the Book Clubs to be very interesting...and helpful. Thanks.
Contributor
bookworm331
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi everyone,

My name is Jayne and reading is one of my passions. This is going to be alot of fun talking about books. I am always looking for the next great book to read. One of my favorite books is The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. I bought a signed first edition of this book, my first signed copy. I hope everyone reads this book and hopefully he will publish more books. Happy reading
Contributor
cmprofessor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions



SamHouston wrote:
Hello everyone.

I've been a book collector since the seventies and I found myself drawn to first editions in the early eighties. I have about 1200 books on the shelves in my study and my biggest problem these days is deciding which ones get to remain on the shelves and which have to be relegated to the closets for storage. It's a constant battle and it keeps me busy.

I have to admit that I was a bit of a "book speculator" for a while and that I sometimes bought up a stack of first editions that I found on the bargain tables of bookstores. For instance, I bought about a dozen first edition copies of Toni Morrison's "Beloved" before she won the big prize for it. Those copies have gone up in value and I've been able to take them to book shows and trade them for other books that I want to add to my own collection, so it's been worth the "risk." But I don't do much of that these days.

Anyway, just wanted to say hello and that I find this part of the Book Clubs to be very interesting...and helpful. Thanks.


Hi: thanks for your note. Like you, I enjoy browsing bookstores and the bargain tables. But, I haven't attended any book shows yet. How did you pick ones to go to?

Mike
New User
trutut
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-04-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

I am Tru. Although I have old books etc, I really am just saving them from yard sales etc that were going to throw them away. Then I started reading them and was quite surprised at the writing from over 100 years ago. So I started trying to find (to read and not to buy) the originals of well known stories. Again I was so pleasantly surprised when I read Beauty and the Beast. So diff. from Disney's and all other variations (and hard to find too). And Robin Hood was such a disappointment. A rather junky read.

I really try not to buy books and am unsuccessful. I have little money and space. But since I read the mystery author John Dunning it was like seeing light at the end of a tunnel. His main character is a serious bookseller. If I could grasp this collecting thing I could have permission to go into each book pile (smile) I find and maybe be able to get a little supplement to my meager income. What fun that would be. Must find a bibliography that he was referring to. That would be a good start but I'm sure only the big library would have one and not let me take it out. But, that's ok. I can bring a pillow for the uncomfortable chairs.

One of my book rescues is 19th century. I have a nice copy of Persuasion by Jane Austen. It's a 1903 Boston Little,Brown,&Co edition. You can see the plate mark on the pictures and the thin cover sheet over them. Some are in real bad shape, but some are rather good. Some are private printings. I've not a clue where to check to see if they might be worth anything except eBay. I have more books than space. Don't we all. And I buy library books which I know are not worth anything except to me.

Although the Dunning stories aren't a great read, the theme around book collecting has a ton of insight into publishing, printing etc. And he has his own website for searches and sales too.

The last rescue I read was Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm and I was totally surprised at the ethics and teaching of this growing girl. It was so refreshing. Wish it would be a movie for today. The prints were wonderful too. I foolishly gave it to a young girl to read. I don't mind not getting it back but I don't think she read it. Oh well.

Thank you for reading. Hope I posted this right and it goes into the correct section.

Tru
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Ah! A Tru kindred spirit! You've heard of a coffee table book, haven't you? Well, why not arrange three or four bibliopiles into a book coffee table? Think of the money you could save on furniture!

Isn't the real, non Shirley Temple Rebecca a surprise and a delight? You owe it to yourself to find a first edition. I, too, love the nineteenth century textbooks and children's stories--so full of good character and characters. Now you should begin searching for the original Elsie Dinsmore books--just don't let any little girl leave your home with one!

trutut wrote:
I am Tru. Although I have old books etc, I really am just saving them from yard sales etc that were going to throw them away. Then I started reading them and was quite surprised at the writing from over 100 years ago. So I started trying to find (to read and not to buy) the originals of well known stories. Again I was so pleasantly surprised when I read Beauty and the Beast. So diff. from Disney's and all other variations (and hard to find too). And Robin Hood was such a disappointment. A rather junky read.

I really try not to buy books and am unsuccessful. I have little money and space. But since I read the mystery author John Dunning it was like seeing light at the end of a tunnel. His main character is a serious bookseller. If I could grasp this collecting thing I could have permission to go into each book pile (smile) I find and maybe be able to get a little supplement to my meager income. What fun that would be. Must find a bibliography that he was referring to. That would be a good start but I'm sure only the big library would have one and not let me take it out. But, that's ok. I can bring a pillow for the uncomfortable chairs.

One of my book rescues is 19th century. I have a nice copy of Persuasion by Jane Austen. It's a 1903 Boston Little,Brown,&Co edition. You can see the plate mark on the pictures and the thin cover sheet over them. Some are in real bad shape, but some are rather good. Some are private printings. I've not a clue where to check to see if they might be worth anything except eBay. I have more books than space. Don't we all. And I buy library books which I know are not worth anything except to me.

Although the Dunning stories aren't a great read, the theme around book collecting has a ton of insight into publishing, printing etc. And he has his own website for searches and sales too.

The last rescue I read was Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm and I was totally surprised at the ethics and teaching of this growing girl. It was so refreshing. Wish it would be a movie for today. The prints were wonderful too. I foolishly gave it to a young girl to read. I don't mind not getting it back but I don't think she read it. Oh well.

Thank you for reading. Hope I posted this right and it goes into the correct section.

Tru


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Inspired Contributor
ABH47
Posts: 40
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hello everyone!
I just stumbled upon this group and haven't yet read all the posts, but for sure I LOVE books! In fact, until I started reading here, I thought I was alone in having used up all the book shelf space in my house! I have had piles of books, mostly hard cover, climbing up walls for years now! I try to buy first editions, mainly of fiction that I like, but I also collect here and there. My most recent purchase of a collectible book was "A Christmas Carol", NOT a first edition but a very nice one.

I guess the reason I'm posting here is to get some encouragement to keep my books and not give in to pressure to give them to the library! I have taken over 100 away and just can't seem to continue to do so! I just joined B&N book clubs and am on the Literature By Women group as well...they are reading Edith Warton and of course, in one of my piles I found my copy of "House of Mirth". If I start taking everything to the library, a lot of my previously read books will be gone, and, in a situation like the one mentioned above, I would have had to purchase the book again. I also have a very nice collection of reference books on Early American antiques, as I used to have a small shop. I don't know if I should 'unload those, but it seems a shame since many are quite valuable and out of print today. I also have nice reference books on Native American culture as that was a big interest of mine, as well as Women in the West (pioneer women).I also look for older cookbooks. As you can see, I have many interests and there are books on everything, so my books keep coming into the house and don't seem to leave.
Any support for keeping my books would be appreciated.
Thank you and I will go back to reading more of your posts now!

Alexis
Contributor
cmprofessor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi Alexis:

I agree with you about wanting to keep your books! Yesterday, my wife and I visited a new (to us) used book store. She suggested, as we were leaving, that I could trade in some of my other books for store credit towards other purchases. I asked her why I would want to do that?! The owner of the book store said that having so many books was the reason she opened up the book store. As you have a history of being a shop owner, perhaps opening your own book store would be a way to see your (and others') books "circulate" but always have some?

Mike
Frequent Contributor
suetu
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎08-10-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

[ Edited ]
Hmmm, Daniel seems to be MIA for the past few months. I'll introduce myself nonetheless. My name is Susan. I'm a 38-year-old editor living in San Francisco. I just posted about a very silly literary collection under the "Find your Niche" thread, but I'm not a serious collector. I just seem to accrue books of all sorts because I love them. I live in a studio apartment with one cat and a few thousand books, which probably tells you quite a bit about me.

As I mentioned, I am not the least bit serious about collecting, but the books collect all the same. Someone else posted about ARCs. Because I attend a lot of publishing trade shows, I have hundreds of these around the apartment. Value or no, it saves me a gazillion dollars I might otherwise spend on new books. And I do know there are people who collect these pre-publication editions specifically. Also, there are hundreds and hundreds of signed books on my shelves. Some are just a signature. Some have very personal inscriptions. Some are inside jokes with the author. And some have wonderful drawings.

You want to hear something silly? My first name (Susan) is so darn common that on three occasions I've found used books with incredibly personal and interesting author inscriptions to some other Susan. Cracks me up! Now everyone will think that I threw that wonderful party that Julian Gough so enjoyed he declared me the "hostess with the mostess." Or that Peter Lefcourt retitled "Eleven Karens" "Eleven Susans" just for me. Obviously those books were meant to reside on my shelves, LOL.

Message Edited by suetu on 10-30-2007 02:21 PM
Susan
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cmprofessor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi Susan:

Thanks for your post. I'm interested in learning more about trade shows. I live in northeast Pennsylvania. Philadelphia and New York are reasonably close. Are there trade shows in either city you would recommend as a first time experience?

And, I thought your comments about ARCs interesting. I have a few and think they're fun to own.

Mike
Frequent Contributor
suetu
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎08-10-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi Mike,

Well, the trade shows I'm refering to are just that--trade only. You need to prove industry affiliation.

There are some wonderful consumer shows in your neck of the woods, though, such as New York is Book Country or The New Yorker Festival. If I can find a convenient list of consumer shows around the US, I'll post it here.

As for ARCs, my two favorite things are reading a book before anyone else can get their hands on it, and discovering new favorite authors you might never have looked at if the publisher hadn't handed you a copy of the book.
Susan
_________________
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Contributor
luckycharm6139
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎01-07-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi Daniel, can you please tell me how, if I wanted to sell one of my books online I would go about it, and what if anything do they charge to sell it. Thank You.
Contributor
luckycharm6139
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎01-07-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi Everyman, my name is Norma and I also have an eclectic taste. I wish my home we big enough to hold 12,000 books! I would be in my glory! Have you read all or most of the books you have purchased?
New User
bakerstbooks
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-13-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi All -
Im a small time book dealer and collector. I only sell online and have loved learning the finer points about books and what to look for to be sure you're holding a first edition (Thanks to Ian Ellis and Stephen Windwalker). And when you find a nice book signed by an author who you love its a great experience. Especially when you found it at a thrift store for only a dollar.
Collecting quality antique books to fill my personal bookcase is a joy that I didn't expect when I started this new hobby. I love the idea of being able to hold a piece of history. An artfully tooled and decorated leather bound book or a nicely flowered cloth board book is an art that has long past. I picture these gentlemen wearing bollers shopping for books to put in their family libraries at their victorian homes. Of course I wont have that type of home but someday I would like to recreate that type of library.
Most of my life I had not been a book reader let alone a book lover. But some time back I was shown a new world which I wish had been shown much sooner.
Now I have many years ahead with a new appreciation of one of the most noble professions on earth.
Im honored to be able to be a seller and to bring enjoyment to readers. Not to mention the love of the hunt scouting these old antique beautiful books. And if I happen to find a nice collectible treasure or two that'll be a nice bonus :smileyhappy:

Happy Collecting,
Kyle
So Many Books, So Little Time
Contributor
cmprofessor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi all:

Please allow me to catch up with a few of you:

Susan, thanks for suggesting the New York is Book Country and New Yorker Festival. I'll look into those. And, I agree with your comments about ARCs. I have a few and they were a lot of fun to read before the reviews came out (but I found myself in a rather polar situation with the reviewers?!).

Norma, someday I hope to be able to claim I've read all the books in my home and office but I really don't think that will ever happen! My collection has been growing now that I have more time to devote to it...

Kyle, it was nice to read your post. As a collector, where do you typically find your treasures? I've found the Strand Bookstore in NY City to be a wonderful place to go.

This has been fun and I hope the conversation continues!

Mike
New User
westburytf
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-15-2007
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hello my name is Tabitha. I love reading about history, science, philosophy,religion,adventure...well pretty much about anything. Right now I am working on starting a private library for myself. Can anyone suggest some books that I might be interested in reading?
Contributor
cmprofessor
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Welcome and Introductions

Hi Tabitha:

Thanks for your post. For books of interest, I've found the NY Times Book Review to be very helpful. It's part of the Sunday edition and there's an online version.

Hope that helps,
Mike
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