Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Contributor
ReadingFix
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎12-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

A couple of titles that made an impact on my life

Summer of my German Soldier by Bette Greene: 1st book that ever made me cry
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen: 1st book that taught me the meaning of reading for enjoyment and not homework (I was in 11th grade at the time =) )
Ishmael and My Ishmeal by Daniel Quinn: great thought provokers

Currently working on:
the Wrinkle in Time Quintet by Madeleine L'Engle, I'm on #4

That's it for now!
Contributor
LucNesbitt
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

I'm new to this board and simply reading all the suggestions has given me some great ideas on new authors and titles. I'm normally a crime mystery / spy thriller kind of reader but have been wanting to branch out. Thanks for all the new ideas.

My own to add ...
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List


ande wrote: Speaking of films: I guess I better read Atonement before seeing the movie.

I just finished Atonement. It's beautifully written. Each word on the page matters. Ian McEwan is clearly a master composer of the English language. But at what point does distract from the story?

I enjoyed reading it, but far more for the writer's use of the language than for the story itself. Is that wrong?

ande wrote: Whenever I do it the other way around I regret it.

That's funny, I usually watch first, then read. Reading after seeing allows me to get deeper into the story and helps answer questions I may have had. Also, if I read first, I find myself muttering "that's not what happens" throughout the film. That makes me a lot of fun.


Looking for a discussion? Find a Book Club for all your interests!


Frequent Contributor
AJ981979
Posts: 118
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

The beauty of any good writing is that the language moves like a song. Any person can put words on a page - making them feel takes talent.



Maria_H wrote:

ande wrote: Speaking of films: I guess I better read Atonement before seeing the movie.

I just finished Atonement. It's beautifully written. Each word on the page matters. Ian McEwan is clearly a master composer of the English language. But at what point does distract from the story?

I enjoyed reading it, but far more for the writer's use of the language than for the story itself. Is that wrong?

ande wrote: Whenever I do it the other way around I regret it.

That's funny, I usually watch first, then read. Reading after seeing allows me to get deeper into the story and helps answer questions I may have had. Also, if I read first, I find myself muttering "that's not what happens" throughout the film. That makes me a lot of fun.


~ Happiness is a good book, a sleeping cat, and a glass of wine. ~
New User
jonnajonna
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

I'm happy to say that this is my first post and I LOVE this topic! Thank you for all the fantastic recommendations! I too, am going to jump on in with a short list of my own (in to particular order):

The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters by Gordon Dahlquist
I jumped on this at it's release and loved the escape I found it in. I love the magical, mysterious tone as well as what could be described as "real life". I would love to see this one made into a movie! (I have all the actors picked out already!)

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
One of those that changed my life. It was a required read for me back in HS. I fell in love with it then and have re-read it numerous times since.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
My absolute favorite book and one that I read every winter. This is a MUST read for everyone.

The Princess Bride by William Goldman
Yes, I love the movie-the book is better...AND it has a map...

My Name is Asher Lev by Chaim Potok
Another one of those "defining moments" books.

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
I found it hard not to become completely sucked into this book. It's dark, sad and all too real.

AND the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling
I have found over the years that I have become rather emotionally involved with Harry and his World. I chose to NOT read the books because I felt that I was "too old" for them when they came out. That was a mistake. If you've chosen to NOT read these for whatever reason, I believe now is the time to pick one up. You'll have books 1-3 done before dinner, but from 4 on, I have a feeling that you'll begin to see what everyone has been talking about.
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

Thanks to jonnajonna and all of you new Book Explorers. Welcome! We're compiling quite a JUST READ IT LIST. Keep it up. And will you tell us what you think of some of the recommended books once you read them?
Frequent Contributor
Kimmi373
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

Summer Sisters by Judy Blume. I read every book she wrote twice as a pre-teen. Reading her adult fiction was like finding an old friend again.

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield. A Barnes and Nobles "unputdownable" for a very good reason. A beautifully written book with a mystery at its heart that just keeps you guessing. I love a book that makes me think long after I have finished reading it.
I don’t want realism. I want magic!
~ Tennessee Williams, "A Streetcar Named Desire"
New User
Kalelea
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

The Red Tent by Anita Diamant

Memoirs of a Geisha -the film is visually beautiful, but to really apreciate the full story you need to read the novel.

James Rollins novels (all of them). I just finished Excavation and am in the middle of Sandstorm.

Romanov Prophecy and Amber Room, both by Steve Berry. I'm not really happy with the current series he's writing, mostly because I found the continuity of events between Templar Legacy and Alexandria Link a little confusing, particularly the age of his son. I may of just misunderstood or needed to re-read Templar Legacy before continuing.
Frequent Contributor
luciadelabyss
Posts: 280
Registered: ‎10-30-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

I also had to read Brave New World in High School, but it gave me a taste for apocalyptic literature! There is also one by Ira Levin that was as intricate, but the title is escaping me at the moment. If anyone is interested in a realistic portrayal of life after a nuclear disaster, "Warday" gave me nightmares. It is cowritten by Whitley Striber and James....(begins with a K). Not doing too good with the memory references tonight! :smileytongue:
I never heard of Harry Potter until the movies came out, but the stories are addicting! JK Rowling makes the story flow so well that even slow readers love them. My collection was completed with birthday presents this year. :smileyhappy:
New User
biblioholic
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-03-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

I would like to second the Chiam Potok book, or anything by Chiam Potok, his writing just draws you into the book. Speaking of rituals, I do not know how many times I have read Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. I used to read it every year after first reading it when I was about 11 years old. Another classic I have read several times is Kidnapped by Robert L. Stevenson. I also highly recommend the Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. Right now I'm heavy into mystery/crime thrillers. Elizabeth George is a stand out in that field. Her books follow a set of characters who work for New Scotland Yard. Good reading!

Biblioholic
New User
marilady
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎01-14-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

Here's a short list:

Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert - "One Women's Search for Everything across Italy, India, and Indonesia". Autobiographical, a search for self-awareness by the author. Full of humor and good stories, and great memorable writing.

A Little Love Story by Roland Merullo - an amazing love story about a woman with a chronic illness, and a man, and their relationship in dealing with that disease. One of the most sensitive books I have ever read.

Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich - an undercover look at living poor by a journalist. She works at Wal-Mart, as a waitress, and as a Merry Maid or the equivalent. Eye-opening, to say the least.

Flight by Sherman Alexie - an author I knew about in college, and rediscovered through the gift of a friend. Writes with raw truthful uncomfortable passion about kids and people with Native American background. This book deals with a teenager and gives him the opportunity to examine his choices through time travel.

For lighter fare, I turn to Elizabeth Peters' Amelia Peabody mysteries. Archaeological suspense/mystery set in the late 1800s/early 1900s. Laugh-out-loud funny and gripping. First one is Crocodile on the Sandbank. Don't give up on it until you've read through at least book 6 (there's about 15 and counting).
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

Hi Marilady:
I've always been a big tipper because I sent time as a waitress, but after reading Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich I became a really big tipper. And I try to be as considerate and as pleasant as possible at all times. Housekeeping staffs at hotels especially -- I keep the mess to the bare minimum and leave a really big tip. Oh, and when I shop I try not to make life miserable for the people who have straighten up the racks.
Ande
New User
RainyH
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

I read one of Elizabeth Peters' novels and really enjoyed it. It was one of the middle ones so I felt like I'd missed a lot. I keep meaning to start at the beginning of the series-its on my mental to read list.

When I was in high school, one of my English teachers recommended Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. I loved it and read it a number of times. By the last reading my politics and personal beliefs had really changed so I didn't agree with a lot of her underlying premises but it is still part of my mental landscape. I've also realized that the book tells me a lot about my teacher that I didn't know at the time.

Some books have become so much a part of my life that re-reading them is like visiting old friends. Steven King says that he has people ask him what happened to the characters from "The Stand" as if they are real people. The characters from Harry Potter have become part of our family over the years through both the books and the movies. There are lots of others-I'd love to hear from other people what characters from books seem like old friends.
Frequent Contributor
FrankieD
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎12-16-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List



IBIS wrote:
I'm also a fan of Frank Lloyd Wright, ever since I visited the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan when I was 12. I remember thinking that the architect was a better artist than the contemporary art show I was seeing there. For the life of me I don't even remember who the artists on exhibit were.

But I remembered Wright, and his architecture. Was Loving Frank a biography by his wife? I'm sure you learned a lot about Wright's personal life. As a teacher of Construction Technology, did the book teach you new things about your field?

IBIS


Okay...a month later and I'm finally answering some questions...duh!!! Anyway, Loving Frank was based on the diaries of his "lover" and not his wife. As for teaching me new ideas about construction??? not really, but I got a better perspective of Frank Lloyd Wright's life and that added to the overall picture. I use two other books each year with my students (high school) and have them read them...House by Tracy Kidder, and A Place of My Own by Michael Pollan. Both are non-fiction and are about construction...and they both mention Wright's work and so discussions are common on his influences on architecture. Unfortunately, not all of the students have the same passion for construction so these discussions are often like a visit to the dentist...a lot of tooth pulling.
By the way, there is a house designed by Wright that is near where I live so occasionally I just drive by and smile :smileyhappy:

FrankieD :smileyhappy:
" The longer I live...the more beautiful life becomes."
- Frank Lloyd Wright
Frequent Contributor
karinlib
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List



biblioholic wrote:
I would like to second the Chiam Potok book, or anything by Chiam Potok, his writing just draws you into the book. Speaking of rituals, I do not know how many times I have read Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. I used to read it every year after first reading it when I was about 11 years old. Another classic I have read several times is Kidnapped by Robert L. Stevenson. I also highly recommend the Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane. Right now I'm heavy into mystery/crime thrillers. Elizabeth George is a stand out in that field. Her books follow a set of characters who work for New Scotland Yard. Good reading!

Biblioholic




Chaim Potok is one of my absolute favorite authors. I liked "The Chosen" and "the Promise", but I think my favorite one is "The Book of Lights". I read all of his books again when he died a few years ago, and enjoyed them just as much as when I read them in College.

Karin
Correspondent
momgee
Posts: 584
Registered: ‎07-24-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List/Welcome new Explorers!



ande wrote:
Welcome all you new Book Explorers! And thanks for adding to the Just Read It list. I have not read many of your recommendations and with winter settling in here in the Northeast -- and with more storms on the way -- I welcome them. Nothing like a good book on a cold night. I reread The Sheltering Sky (Paul Bowles) every winter and all that desert terrain warms me up. Do any of you have similar reading rituals?

Ande




Hi every year on my birthday I read the Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner don't know why but I just do weird, huh?

kaye
"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."
Groucho Marx
New User
Cvr2Cvr
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-30-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List/Welcome new Explorers!

I have a few wonderful books to recommend:

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Satterfield,The Time Traveller's Wife, and Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress.

Regarding Barbara Kingsolver's eariler work, The Poisonwood Bible still haunts me today and I read it years ago. I recommend it! I can't wait to get started on some of the titles everyone has put up here. I LOVE sharing about great books!

Emily
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List/Welcome new Explorers!

Emily:

I started with her earliest books The Bean Trees and then Pigs in Heaven and immediately fell in love with Barbara Kingsolver. I've had The Poisonwood Bible on my bookshelf forever and there is no good reason as to why I have not read it yet. All my pals raved about it. Maybe you've given me the push I need.

Ande
New User
bookmark55
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-01-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List

That's strange. I am sure Katherine Dunn has written several novels. What about Attic and that Fox one and Truck?
Frequent Contributor
Timbuktu1
Posts: 1,572
Registered: ‎12-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #1: The Book Explorers Just Read It List



marilady wrote:
Here's a short list:

Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert - "One Women's Search for Everything across Italy, India, and Indonesia". Autobiographical, a search for self-awareness by the author. Full of humor and good stories, and great memorable writing.

A Little Love Story by Roland Merullo - an amazing love story about a woman with a chronic illness, and a man, and their relationship in dealing with that disease. One of the most sensitive books I have ever read.

Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreich - an undercover look at living poor by a journalist. She works at Wal-Mart, as a waitress, and as a Merry Maid or the equivalent. Eye-opening, to say the least.

Flight by Sherman Alexie - an author I knew about in college, and rediscovered through the gift of a friend. Writes with raw truthful uncomfortable passion about kids and people with Native American background. This book deals with a teenager and gives him the opportunity to examine his choices through time travel.

For lighter fare, I turn to Elizabeth Peters' Amelia Peabody mysteries. Archaeological suspense/mystery set in the late 1800s/early 1900s. Laugh-out-loud funny and gripping. First one is Crocodile on the Sandbank. Don't give up on it until you've read through at least book 6 (there's about 15 and counting).




I really enjoyed Eat Pray Love too. I wasn't expecting much. Thought it would be another whiny memoir but I really enjoyed it. Couldn't put it down.