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ande
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#11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

[ Edited ]

Hello there, Book Explorers:

 

I have to say I have very mixed feelings about the Writers Guild of America’s strike coming to an end. Please note that this remark should not be seen as anti-labor and has nothing to do with the revenue “content creators” earn from current and future technology. No, it really comes down to this: I watch as much good stuff and crap on TV as anyone and I have gotten lots more reading done since most of the shows I watch have either disappeared or lapsed into reruns.

 

You might ask: Don’t you have the discipline to ignore your TV and just read? You might as well ask: Why don’t you stop buying Trader Joe’s ice cream bon-bons? What can I say? Sometimes after a long day –- particularly my kind of long day made up of many phone calls, emails and work-related reading –- I just like to give my brain a rest.

 

But a month or so into the writer’s strike I began reading fiction almost every evening -- except for when I rented the first season of The Closer, which I hadn’t watched. It will be interesting now to see if I can keep that reading trend going.

 

One more time: I love writers, I am married to one and I am not anti-labor. Maybe one result of the strike will be like one of those baby booms nine months after a blackout. Wouldn’t it be nice to know that when the writers put their pencils down American did the same with their remotes and read more books?

 

I’d like to know: Did you get more reading done? Will you keep it going? Or are you going to be watching Dancing with the Stars?

 

Also, how about all that great exposure for books at the Oscars last night (I watched!)? There’s already an active discussion about Atonement going on in our Book Explorers community. Any Cormac McCarthy fans out there? I love his books but haven’t read No Country for Old Men yet. Have you? I haven’t read Oil! Have you?

 

Ande

 



Message Edited by ande on 02-26-2008 11:26 AM
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tgem
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

[ Edited ]
ande,
 
A person can get a lot of reading done during commericials.  I've found myself reading more since I started reading posts on this website.  I think having people to communicate with about a mutual obsession is inspiring.
 
The Oscars didn't seem as exciting as usual - I can't really say why.  It was interesting how many book inspired movies were involved and that should be a good thing.  I just ordered Cormac McCarthy's Border Trilogy books from the B&N buy 2 paperbacks, get the third free sale.  Many friends have recommended him, so I'm looking forward to reading his books.
 
I would like to recommend the book The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.  (The movie derived from it was nominated a couple times.)  It's a truly amazing and inspiring book, and I can't help but think it would be better to read the book first.  For those who haven't seen/read - it's a memoir written by Jean-Dominique Bauby.  He was only 43, and the editor of French Elle, when he had a stroke that left him a paralyzed, with only the ability to blink one eye.  By doing this he wrote this book!
 
The writer's strike didn't put a damper on my favorite guilty pleasure - the soaps.  They just kept going - like their casts of many characters, known to live, die, and live again.
 
tgem
 
 


Message Edited by tgem on 02-25-2008 08:19 PM
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Oldesq
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

I would like to point out that saying There Will be Blood is inspired by Oil! by Upton Sinclair is like saying Fargo was inspired by Rand McNally.  It was a terrific read in any event.

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Maria_H
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books


 ande wrote: Sometimes after a long day –- particularly my kind of long day made up of many phone calls, emails and work-related reading –- I just like to give my brain a rest.

Amen -- thank goodness the strike is over!  The queue in my DVR was getting shorter and shorter and filled with things to watch only as a desperate last resort measure (though, sadly, not even nearly good enough to be labeled a guilty pleasure).  Gossip Girls, Cashmere Mafia, anyone?  Yeesh. 

But they sure make New York City look pretty.

Ugly Betty, 30 Rock, Dirty Sexy Money, I welcome you back with open and grateful arms!



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Crystal8i8
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

Everyday I watch the same things on TV.  M*A*S*H on the Hallmark channel til 7 (has anyone read Alda's book, Never Have Your Dog Stuffed?  It was a really fun read, I read it during the travel to and from the boat for my Carribean cruise last year,)  then Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy (I don't keep track, I just use them to try and keep my brain sharp) and I think it's Wednesday that I watch the old British comedy Are You Being Served?  Unless there's a really good movie on or a show I just have to see, I go upstairs and read afterwards.  I read during the commercials anyways. 
 
I just like to get into the same groove...   And after a hard day at work, I'm either laughing with the characters on M*A*S*H or following their tiredness. 
 
I was one of those kids who could do their homework and watch TV at the same time and my grades didn't suffer.  Guess I was just lucky.  Then again I used to be able to read two or three books at a time and not get them confused and I probably could now, if I tried.  I find that I read so much and so fast now, that by the time I even think about starting a second book, I've finished the last one.
 
I sometimes wonder at the things I watch on TV...  Do all these older shows make me an old soul in a 24 year olds body?  Or am I just wise beyond my days?   Being forced into adulthood at an early age probably didn't help.
The Butterfly Girl 8i8

"Children aren't coloring books. You don't get to fill them with your favorite colors." - The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
Melissa_W
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

Nah....my favorite TV show is still the Muppet Show, sadly not in re-runs anywhere (used to be on Nick at Nite, when adults still watched the channel) but happily being released on DVD.
 
I think the recent strike caused many of us to either read more books or watch more DVDs/go to the movie theatre (in my case, some of both).  I definitely put Netflix to the test once CSI, Numbers, and Criminal Minds all ran out of new episodes.

Crystal8i8 wrote:
 
I sometimes wonder at the things I watch on TV...  Do all these older shows make me an old soul in a 24 year olds body?  Or am I just wise beyond my days?   Being forced into adulthood at an early age probably didn't help.



Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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ande
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

My sister and I are capable of watching endless reruns of Law & Order. Sometimes when I'm visiting her we settle in for a five-hour marathon. Doesn't matter how many times I've/we've seen the episode.
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Linda10
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

I agree that it was easy to read a book while watching the Academy Awards -- (that's what I was doing) -- not only during the commercials but even during the show most of the time.  It certainly did seem ho-hum this year. 
 
It made me think of that quote by Groucho Marx that goes something like this:  "Television sure is educational.  Every time someone turns on the TV, I go to the library and read a book."
 
 
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karinlib
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

To be honest, I have never watched much TV, because I would much prefer to do something else.  Since I tend to read the news on the Internet, I have no need to watch the news.  I am a pretty consistent reader, and there isn't much that distracts me from it. 
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dhaupt
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Re: #11: Tuning in, tuning out -- plus Oscar books

Well Ande the writers strike being over won't effect my reading at all since I don't watch TV although my husband is a classic tv remote addict and can't quite light on one channel or another so I am able to tone out the tv.