Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

#3: Chestnuts and roastings

[ Edited ]
First, I salute you, Book Explorers! I’ve really enjoyed the conversations we’ve had in the last few weeks. It’s been great fun for me to hear what you have to say about all things having to do with books and reading -- I truly appreciate the personal preferences and insights you share. You’ve have done a great job adding to the growing Just Read It and the Just Put it Down Lists –- let’s keep those going.

Part of what I try to do each week is to demystify the process of how certain books get attention, get into your hands and then ask you to try to describe the magic that occurs when you find a great book –- and what makes you want to tell someone to Just Read It!

Besides all the books I read for work (as the editorial director of the Literary Ventures Fund) and for pure pleasure (as a civilian) I also read a steady stream of newspapers, magazines, blogs, newsletters and other publishing trade publications. Unless you tell me it bores you to death I will continue to include items from my readings that either provide some happy insight into what’s going on in the world of books or make me want to pull my hair out – or both.

The common thread in my reading about the industry these days: It’s a jungle out there. No big literary blockbusters this year. Oprah and Starbucks move books better than anyone. Disappearing print book reviews. Publishers running around like chickens without heads trying to figure out which format readers want in the increasingly fragmented media environment. Or as John Freeman, president of the National Book Critics Circle, said in the LA Times: “Bookselling is becoming a winner-take-all game, with the lion's share of promotion going to a few bestselling authors, leaving the rest to fend for themselves in an ever-more-crowded publishing environment.” The same article noted that “roughly 200,000 titles were published this year.” So that means that you’ll get to hear about very few of those books. Not good. Do you agree? Disagree?

Speaking of formats, I ask you to consider this item, sent by Harvard Nieman fellow Andrew Quinn. I’m speechless.

“More than half of the top-selling fiction books in Japan for the first half of this year were written on a cell phone. According to the Sydney Morning Herald, mobile phone novels (called keitai shousetsu) have become a publishing phenomenon in the country. One book, Koizora (Love Sky), which is about a high-school girl who is bullied and gang-raped and then becomes pregnant, has sold more than 1.2 million copies since being published. The average sales numbers are around 400,000”

How about that? I’d love to know what you think about this. I don’t mind the front end of this delivery system, but I can tell you this: I won’t be reading books, chapters or even copyright pages on my cell phone anytime soon.

If this topic is way too complex for your brain that has been overloaded via your own effective delivery system with holiday sugar, fats and who knows what else I leave you with a recommendation of music to read by. It’s a Nat King Cole time of year and while these songs aren’t holiday-themed, they are chestnuts nonethess. This is what has been playing in my house: a recently released CD (on the Collector’s Choice label) that pairs two Nat King Cole vinyl albums “Welcome to the Club” and “Tell Me All About Yourself.”

Do you listen to music when you read? Does it have to match the book's theme? Instrumentals only? In the background or via headphones/ear buds?

Happy holidays to all!

Ande

Message Edited by ande on 12-19-2007 12:02 PM
Inspired Scribe
IBIS
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

Ande, to your simple question: do you listen to music while reading?

As a professional violinist with the Boston Symphony, I am hypersensitively aware of any music... my audio-radar goes into high alert whenever and wherever ANY kind of music is played. My attention zeroes in on the music, and all my other senses go into sleep-mode.

So when I read, I prefer no music at all... which is why I envy people who can relax and read in coffeeshops with blaring music ....

IBIS
IBIS

"I am a part of everything that I have read."
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

IBIS:
I'll bet as a professional musicians you have vast and wonderful knowledge. Even though you can't listen to music while you're reading, would you consider making some recommendations?
Ande
New User
boboflo
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎12-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

I prefer no music but even with the tv on or my kids music blaring when I drift into "bookland" or wherever the book is taking place I am in the book. Walking beside the lake the character is walking beside listening to the water as is moves along or hearing the hard breathing in a fight that has just happened. I think I lose myself sometimes. LOL
New User
LdyJzz64
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

Like you, because I am a musician/vocalist, I cannot listen to music while reading; it simply is too distracting. I become so involved in listening and feeling the emotions of each musician that I can't concentrate on what I am reading. However, I do like to listen to sounds of nature when I am reading--ocean waves, waterfalls, nights sounds with crickets, etc.
Frequent Contributor
ashen_rain
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎09-29-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

[ Edited ]
I do listen to music while I read (through my iPod + headphones) but as I get more and more involved with the book I tend to not even notice the music anymore. Sometimes I'll finish a chapter and notice that the album I've been listening to is almost over, and the last song I remember listening to was at the beginning! I listen to music and read at the same time more when I'm in bed, and on the bus. At school I usually just do one or the other because I like to focus on the music and if I read that won't happen. :smileytongue:
I play acoustic guitar (my school has a course for it!) and piano (mostly Evanescence and Nine Inch Nails songs), but nothing professional like some others here. That's impressive, IBIS! I love the violin. A couple of my friends play, and I'd like to learn, but I don't have the money. Kiss Kiss and Final Fantasy are some good artists that use violins in their music. I also love the remix of "Another Version of the Truth" on Nine Inch Nails' recent album Y34RZ3R0R3M1X3D that takes an originally slow piano instrumental and turns it into a haunting violin piece.

Message Edited by ashen_rain on 12-28-2007 12:22 AM

Message Edited by ashen_rain on 12-28-2007 12:23 AM
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

Greetings and welcome all you new Book Explorers. Great to have you here!
Ande
New User
bwoodin
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-05-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

I agree - I can either listen to music or read, but not both at the same time; guess I just don't have the "duality" to do it!
Babslovesbooks
New User
trueyankee
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-07-2008
0 Kudos

Re: #3: Chestnuts and roastings

I love to listen to music and read books, but I definitely cant do both at the same time. I find that when I read, I have to find some place completely quiet because I tend to hear anything going on around me.
Tricia