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ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
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#36: New Year resolutions, transitions and transformations

[ Edited ]

Dear Book Explorers:

 

Happy New Year and welcome to the interregnum. Strictly speaking that’s the period between sovereigns. Or the period between the people who run the country. That space of time between an election and the inauguration of a new president. Sort of a post-Bush/pre-Obama mini-era.

 

But there are other definitions of interregnum that apply to the new year and our new-year states of mind. Many of you have made resolutions for the new year. So the interregnum for you is that space between “I am” and “I will be.” Hope springs eternal, doesn’t it?

 

All these wishes and plans for transformation, however fleeting, are big business and where there are seasons and trends there are books. There’s probably a book to match every one of your resolutions: losing weight; gaining perspective; finding bliss; going green; taking leaps; shedding baggage; traveling more etc –- you get the picture.

 

Getting to Point A to Point B is tricky stuff and there is an entire subset of books that delve into the process of change and why some do it better than others and even why some get Stuck.

 

What better way to start off the year than telling your fellow Book Explorers about a book that has helped to transform you or gave you great insights into how to make a leap.

 

Here’s mine: Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes, by the aptly named William Bridges. Transitions has been around forever and it is a very simple and short (and often repetitive) book, but it beautifully explains how to think about and live in the middle journey between what is behind and what’s ahead. Its true value is making the case for seeing the in between time as essential to what comes next and not a phase to impatiently race through.

 

What’s yours?

 

As always, I am dying to know.

 

Ande

 

 

Message Edited by ande on 01-07-2009 05:28 PM
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: #36: New Year resolutions, transitions and transformations

Astrid and Veronika is a lovely little book. It did not change me in any earth shattering way but it did make me more aware of the fact that the generations that separate us are not really that wide and there is a bridge that unites the young and old if they are willing to cross it. Everyone has a "ghost" in their closet and we need to try and understand that some people are more troubled than others. If we have more patience and compassion, we can learn to get along far better. All of us suffer our own private "hell" to some degree or another but we are all the same when you get right down to it. We all want to be liked and respected.

Also, the movie Gran Torino (not a book, I am sorry) was an amazing trip into a world where derogatory epithets were perhaps a bit overused and really shocking, at first, but in the end, you come to the realization that it is really not the spoken words that mean anything, it is what is in your heart that really counts. Also, I think that experience really does affect how one reacts, even more than what one is taught. Sometimes you have to look beyond the cover of a person and a book.

twj


ande wrote:

Dear Book Explorers:

 

Happy New Year and welcome to the interregnum. Strictly speaking that’s the period between sovereigns. Or the period between the people who run the country. That space of time between an election and the inauguration of a new president. Sort of a post-Bush/pre-Obama mini-era.

 

But there are other definitions of interregnum that apply to the new year and our new-year states of mind. Many of you have made resolutions for the new year. So the interregnum for you is that space between “I am” and “I will be.” Hope springs eternal, doesn’t it?

 

All these wishes and plans for transformation, however fleeting, are big business and where there are seasons and trends there are books. There’s probably a book to match every one of your resolutions: losing weight; gaining perspective; finding bliss; going green; taking leaps; shedding baggage; traveling more etc –- you get the picture.

 

Getting to Point A to Point B is tricky stuff and there is an entire subset of books that delve into the process of change and why some do it better than others and even why some get Stuck.

 

What better way to start off the year than telling your fellow Book Explorers about a book that has helped to transform you or gave you great insights into how to make a leap.

 

Here’s mine: Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes, by the aptly named William Bridges. Transitions has been around forever and it is a very simple and short (and often repetitive) book, but it beautifully explains how to think about and live in the middle journey between what is behind and what’s ahead. Its true value is making the case for seeing the in between time as essential to what comes next and not a phase to impatiently race through.

 

What’s yours?

 

As always, I am dying to know.

 

Ande

 

 

Message Edited by ande on 01-07-2009 05:28 PM