Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Books, Twitter and getting the message out

[ Edited ]

So the other day my colleagues at  the Literary Ventures Fund and I were on a three-way, three-city conference call when one of them mentioned that he took a train ride from NYC to Princeton the day before to attend a meeting.  He said that he spent much of the time on his iPhone reading Twitter thoughts with links from a savvy and opinionated independent publisher we all knew on a variety of topics. Another colleague sighed and said “It used to be that people used train rides to read books.”  

 

Well, exactly. If you’ve followed this blog you know the train/Twitter/iphone/book collisions go right to the heart of what we discuss and debate and, one hopes, illuminate, all the time.

 

And as you may know, I don’t have a dog in this fight. On one hand I can argue “What’s wrong with a book?” They are pretty portable. But in the last few months I have spent a lot of time waiting for people who had various appointments or in transit and it would have been useful to have something that could deliver some choices (books, periodicals, work files etc). I tend to dive into books – the traditional kind you hold in your hands -- when I have extended down time but this was waiting room down time, parking lot down time. So I can make a case for using fragmented time in a fragmented way: tootling around electronically. Though I also can make the case for daydreaming or just staring off into space, too.

 

Somehow I suspect that you knew this was leading to the T-word: Twitter. I’ve been spending a lot of time in Twitterville lately, mostly to see how the publishing, literary, author, reader world interacts on it and with it. Those 140-character-or-fewer blasts can be painful (“I just read the first chapter of so-and-so’s new book and it stinks”); ultra timely (this week’s Amazon ranking implosion, for example); or, among other things, promotional (read this book, read it now, here’s the link). But I salute any delivery system that supports the discussion of books and reading and gives authors another channel for their words and messages. As I write this, emails about another round of layoffs at Publishers Weekly are piling up.

 

As author/writer/innovation sharpshooter Scott Kirsner says there’s more opportunity than every to get your message out but at the same time there is more communication clutter than ever to machete through. How best to be heard these days as an author or a publisher? Scott’s the right guy to ask because he has just published Fans, Friends & Followers: Building an Audience and a Creative Career in the Digital Age.  Whether you are an author or any kind of creative person trying to be heard or if you’re looking for an instant and insightful primer on how ideas move these days you’ll want to have a look. Great interviews with authors, artists etc. etc., too. Filled with concrete and useful tips. 
 
Ande 
Message Edited by ande on 04-16-2009 05:57 PM
Melissa_W
Posts: 4,124
Topics: 516
Kudos: 966
Blog Posts: 3
Ideas: 15
Solutions: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Books, Twitter and getting the message out

Ok - what's your Twittername? :smileyhappy:

 

Twitter can allow you to have a conversation that you normally wouldn't - there are cell-phone free cars so you can Twitter (or if you're a BlackBerry addict like me you can IM) your conversation rather than talk (which might get you killed on a quiet car).  As a bus rider, I tend to loathe fellow riders who have a long, loud conversation on a crowded bus and much prefer those who text back and forth.  I also like to read the paper while I'm on the bus and getting it via the Sprint 3G network to read on my BB is preferrable to bopping the guy next to me in the head while trying to get the newspaper page turned.

 

That being said, I'm usually in the middle of who-knows-how-many-books and given half the chance I'll read something even if it's only for five minutes (I have the eReader from Fictionwise on my BlackBerry so if I'm on a really crowded bus I can read Emma with one hand and hang on to the pole with the other without having to turn pages).  And I'm a knitter, so if I get a seat to myself I'll knit because I usually have a project with me, too, with my iPod headphones on so people are dissuaded come bothering me about whether or not knitting is hard.

 

(FYI - Twitterers were way ahead of the news media as regards the Amazon ranking/adult content/snafu/#amazonfail which was nice; sometimes there are subtle things going on in the world that just can't wait for CNN to catch up) 


ande wrote:

So the other day my colleagues at  the Literary Ventures Fund and I were on a three-way, three-city conference call when one of them mentioned that he took a train ride from NYC to Princeton the day before to attend a meeting.  He said that he spent much of the time on his iPhone reading Twitter thoughts with links from a savvy and opinionated independent publisher we all knew on a variety of topics. Another colleague sighed and said “It used to be that people used train rides to read books.”

 

Well, exactly. If you’ve followed this blog you know the train/Twitter/iphone/book collisions go right to the heart of what we discuss and debate and, one hopes, illuminate, all the time.

  

Somehow I suspect that you knew this was leading to the T-word: Twitter. I’ve been spending a lot of time in Twitterville lately, mostly to see how the publishing, literary, author, reader world interacts on it and with it. Those 140-character-or-fewer blasts can be painful (“I just read the first chapter of so-and-so’s new book and it stinks”); ultra timely (this week’s Amazon ranking implosion, for example); or, among other things, promotional (read this book, read it now, here’s the link). But I salute any delivery system that supports the discussion of books and reading and gives authors another channel for their words and messages. As I write this, emails about another round of layoffs at Publishers Weekly are piling up.

 

Message Edited by ande on 04-16-2009 05:16 PM


 

 
Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: Books, Twitter and getting the message out

I may be taking this a bit too far but are we all becoming "talking heads"? There seems to be far less human interaction and far more impersonal contact through machines of one kind or another. Do you think this bodes well for the future? Will we all be lined up, just heads on tables, sending thoughts to each others machines or each other? That is one scary evolutionary thought!

Hiding behind aliases and invented personalities can often invite honesty but also its extreme opposite, creative "dishonesty" which could be dangerous as we have seen countless times on the internet. Without any fear of repercussion, anything goes and this kind of technology explosion encourages "anything goes" in cyberspace. If you are anonymous, you just don't have the same concern for your own behavior.

How much diversion do we need? Good old fashioned patience used to be a virture. We could sit back, smell the roses and enjoy a good book for as long as it took and when we tired of the book, we could just sit back and smell the roses or strike up a conversation with the person next to us and actually communicate with them (maybe even about the book) and we could care about each other's ideas or daydream or read a paper or another book! Machines distance us from each other.

I prefer a book to an emachine but if it was an emachine, all I would want it to do is contain books. I still want physical and mental contact with real people, real books, not just substitutes or surrogates.

Voicemail, email, text messaging, call centers, facebook, twitter etc., and other disembodied uses of people and their characters creates an open season for "anything goes" often encouraging disrespect and a cavalier attitude because you have no recourse but to deal with the phantom.

 

Frequent Contributor
WendyLBastaltane
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎02-18-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Books, Twitter and getting the message out

Social Networking

 

http://socialnetwork.meetup.com/boards/

 

..books to be read and those that are reading those books and networking to read these books