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ande
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Gina: Male authors and their female characters

[ Edited ]
I'm pleased -- and often amazed -- when male writers get women so right and so true. Alan Cheuse's Gina is a perfect example -- particularly his dead-on portrait of her mid-life miseries. What do you think? Who are some other authors you admire who have taken on this high-wire act?

Message Edited by ande on 09-03-2007 05:38 PM
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ande
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Re: Gina: Male authors and their female characters

Tell us, Alan, as a author who populates his books with women characters, how did you develop such a knack for writing in a woman's voice? Many of us wonder how you manage to get it so right.
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AlanCheuse
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Re: Gina: Male authors and their female characters

I suppose I'm a latent Jungian, because I believe that we have both
states of mind in our heads from birth onward...(or, as my writer friend
James Houston puts it, in a comic mood, "Men are women, too....")
The rest is part of the writer's work of noticing everything everything
everything that happens around him/her...
The most famous example of this is, of course, "Madame Bovary" and coming
after that, perhaps, "Anna Karenina"...but look at what George Eliot does
with her MALE characters, and Joyce Carol Oates...("Women are men, too....")
A.C.


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ande
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Re: Gina: Male authors and their female characters

Do you ask a woman to give you feedback on what you've written before it goes to your editor? Or are you so experienced at this point that you feel confident about your ability to get the voice right.
Author
AlanCheuse
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Re: Gina: Male authors and their female characters

I give everything to my wife to read, and I'm confident that she will
tell me the truth about her responses. And I've always benefited from
comments from editors at various publishers and magazines.
You probably know that when he was writing "Sons and Lovers" D.H.Lawrence
asked his then girl friend Jesse Bernard to write the sequences about
the protagonist's girlfriend from her point of view?
so, yes, I'm experienced and confident, and at the same time questioning
and wondering if I've gotten things right...


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