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ande
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Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

[ Edited ]
Book Explorers:
 
I know I can count on you to give a warm welcome to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He'll be available to chat all this week (June22) . Just post your comments and questions and he will respond within a reasonable amount of time.
 
For those of you who have read Spirit and already have posted your thoughts: I know he'll be eager to get your feedback. For those of you who haven't had a chance to read (or finish) Spirit since it was JUST published: there's still plenty of ways to interact with the author. He has lots to say about the current state of medicine (he's been writing about one way or another for 30 years); the life of an author; why he uses a pen name; what he's reading and why.
 
The good reviews are already coming in and a few articles already have been written about The Spirit of the Place. Below, is a particularly good one from a widely read publishing industry newsletter. Hope it gets the conversation going! For those of you in the Boston area: Samuel Shem will be discussing Spirit at The Harvard Bookstore on Mass. Ave., Cambridge this Tuesday evening (June 24) at 7 p.m.
 
Thanks,
 
Ande
 

An Imagined Autobiography From the Author of The House of God

Before E.R. and Grey's Anatomy transformed doctors and interns into objects of public fascination, there was Samuel Shem's The House of God -- a dark, funny, emotionally and sexually frank novel about a group of interns at the titular hospital -- written by Dr. Stephen Bergman based on his experiences as an intern at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston.

Since its publication in 1978, The House of God has sold two million copies -- and its timeless, unflinching look at the people and emotions behind the business of medicine has ensured the book's continued status as a page-turner.

Bergman, who began using the pen name Samuel Shem out of consideration for his patients, has since written several other books, fiction and nonfiction, plus a play about the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous, "Bill W. and Dr. Bob."

This month marks the publication of his latest novel, The Spirit of the Place, published by Kent State University Press, with support from the Literary Ventures Fund. It is also the 30-year anniversary of The House of God's debut.

The Spirit of the Place is set in Columbia, New York, a small upstate town on the Hudson River that will feel familiar to residents of, or visitors to, Hudson, New York.

"This book, I call a sort of imagined autobiography," said Bergman. "[The town] would be recognizable to anyone who lives there." The idea for The Spirit of the Place came to Bergman when he returned to Hudson in 1983 for a celebration of the 200-year anniversary of the town's founding. He saw friends from 30 years ago and "was spurred by [his] creative imagination to write this book."

As he wrote, Bergman put in hours of library-time, visited historic spots in Hudson, and reconnected with those old friends.

The Spirit of the Place, set in 1983, is indeed filled with descriptive detail -- but not too much that the flip-ahead urge arises. Bergman is skilled in using the town as a character, and the various settings for key scenes feel instrumental, but not intrusive.

Thus, it's easy for the reader to imagine the tree-lined streets, old buildings, and sparkling river that serve as a backdrop for the drama that results when, upon news of his mother's death, young Dr. Orville Rose returns to his hometown.

Orvy's emotional mixed bag -- fondness, disgust, restlessness, curiosity -- at encountering people from his past, from bullies to dear friends, will feel recognizable to anyone who has made the journey to a hometown long left behind (or anyone who's remained, and now must greet the weary traveler).

To add to the intrigue, Orvy is fresh from a divorce and a year of working abroad for Doctors Without Borders -- a very different life from the ones led by the family and neighbors he worked so hard to leave behind. He is shocked to learn that, although his mother bequeathed him a good deal of money, she attached one condition: He must live in her house, there in Hudson, a year and 13 days before he can collect it.

The plot continues to thicken, as Orvy encounters his childhood nemesis, his beloved mentor (the aging town doctor), and a woman who intrigues him intellectually and physically. Humor, politics, growing pains, and family dynamics are all part of the mix, to excellent effect.

It's not surprising, considering Bergman has worked as a psychiatrist for 35 years. The Harvard- and Oxford-educated author said, "When I went to Harvard Medical School, it was always with the intention that I'd learn to be a doctor and that would be my day job, while somehow I'd find a way to write."

When he became a psychiatrist, Bergman devoted his mornings to writing and scheduled his patients in the afternoon -- an often-challenging routine. "Sometimes it got tough when a story would keep going on my head when I was supposed to be listening. The hard part is when you get a good idea and can't write it down."

But Bergman's ability to help people while having the opportunity to experience all sorts of personalities and problems proved invaluable to his writing.

He said, "Psychiatry was really terrific for me ... I did learn about what makes people tick, and I also saw a ton of different kinds of people from the public as well as private sectors that I wouldn't have necessarily come across otherwise."

The decisions that Orvy and the other characters wrestle with do feel familiar, whether they're about forgiving past hurts or deciding if something (or someone) is worth fighting for.

It's just that sort of thing that gets Bergman excited about writing: "Those 'Hey, wait a second! Why am I doing this?' moments -- we all have those, and we go ahead and do things anyway. If enough of them pile up ... that's what gets my motor going."

Political issues have been on his mind in recent years, too, and they have informed Bergman's reading choices as well as some aspects of The Spirit of the Place. "I mostly read nonfiction now, about economics, hunger, you name it," he said. "This is such an incredibly political time, all the horrible eight years of Bush.

"The Spirit of the Place has a very strong underpinning of the politics of that time, the start of a huge shift in the country from what was a more public-spirited place to the start of the Reagan revolution. It's felt in this town, and in medicine, in 1983 and 1984."

Politics aside, though, Bergman said The Spirit of the Place is about something more fundamental: "I think it's a book about basic human issues. It's a journey of the spirit in terms of going back to your roots."

He added, "One of the easiest things to do as a writer is to take a good situation and tear it all down, a straight line down to something awful.... I think what's a lot harder is to show you the climb out of that, how some characters grow and are redeemed. I believe novels are about that."

Bergman said this positive outlook on human nature is drawn from his personal and professional experiences over the last few decades. "It comes from being a doctor, a person, an author, familiar with AA -- people do grow, they really do. It's astonishing -- they can go through things in the most horrible ways and come out better."

 


 


Message Edited by ande on 06-22-2008 07:55 PM
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Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Dear Readers,
 
It is with gratitude that I join this conversation about my work, especially my new novel, THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE, which has been a labor of love, an imagined autobiography, and a continuation of my enquiry into the shared truths of all of our lives.  And my gratitude to Ande and the Literary Ventures Fund for choosing THE SPIRIT to sponsor and support.  I'll be available most of this week through Friday the 27th June, and then I'm on vacation for two weeks and out of e-mail range (believe it or not!) until we return on the 14 July.
 
I've read the conversation so far, and look forward to participating.
 
You should also know that this is my first time on a web-site thingee, so if I'm awkward, bear with me.
 
Sam


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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

[ Edited ]
Dear All,

Just a quick report. I launched THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE on June 14 Flag Day
in the "place" it is set, my hometown of Hudson on the Hudson River. In a
town known for breakage there was none! Here is my report.

Going back home as a writer writing about going back home was the most
remarkable experience of my writer's life. The Opera House was standing
room only, and it was the first time I read out loud from the novel, and
people really loved it. As an introduction a guy I hadn't seen in 59 years
since we had made a reflecting telescope together for a science project
talked about it as a "focus" and gave me the book we worked from "How to
Make a Telescope." We sold a lot of books. The great thing was the Hudson
Book Club lady had somehow already read the novel in one gulp and was
ecstatic about it and said it was now gong to be read for the July
selection--another book club said the same thing. There were a lot of
hometown folk, but a lot of New Yorkers as well. Hearing it read gave me
confidence about doing that wherever in the future. In fact it sounded like
sounded in my head--what a surprise.

There was a great article on Thursday the 12th on the front page of Register
Star, with
book cover in color--great writing--the guy's a lit prof at SUNY Albany, a
moonlighter. Also a notice in another paper, giving the wrong day and time
for the reading. The only one who got it wrong and showed up just as it was
finishing was, as always happens, a depresssed vulnerable guy I knew who
was on industrial strength antidepressants.

Also, my interview with Alan Chartoff of WAMC Albany went extremely
well--he's smart and loved the book and said that THE HOUSE OF GOD was still
one of his
three favorite books in the world but allowed how THE SPIRIT was "terrific."
He said it on air. He also said that when he does shows on books they jump
a lot on Amazon. He did a teaser for Saturday and the show itself will run
next Thursday or the one after. The reason it was so late an interview was
that it got lost in the pile on his desk.

The evening dinner sponsored by my old friends was an overload of nostalgia,
mostly with friends
although with some NYrkers as well. My father's dental assistants, who had
been with him for 40 years straight (1946-1986) were there--and bought
books (The Spotty Dog sold them). I just kind of got up and talked, and
laughed--told the story of, as a high school kid, going with some friends
(in the room) out into the wilds of the county to a "loose woman's" house,
drinking with her in the front room, and then after a while she asking us 17
year olds if we would like to go into the back room and "see my **bleep**." We
averred that we would. We went into the back room and were met by a lion.
Not a stuffed lion. A real live big big lion. We saw it and ran.

That's all, that's it. It don't get any better than that.

Bottom line: everyone who has read THE SPIRIT loves it. The event was in
conflict with the annual Columbia County Hx Society gala dinner, which cut
into the crowds--but the president stopped by to make sure we met and said
he wanted me to come back in the fall to do an event with them--which I
shall.

Oh--Hudson's most glorious holiday is Flag Day, the same Saturday. Since
the parade was about to start as I was about to end, I read from THE
SPIRIT'S Columbus Day Parade and its breakage on pages 49-51 (the Chevy as
Nina Pinta
bursting into flames) and ended the reading with the admonition not to stand
under lightposts, powerlines, or trees when the mayor begins to speak. The
only breakage my weekend there was that although clear skies had been
predicted
by the Colubmia weahterman, it was dark and rainy, so that when after dinner
we went out to the street to watch the fireworks, while there were loud
explosions from the riverfront there was no real light, and for all we knew
the BOOM BOOM BOOMS could have been disastrous collapsings and implosions
leaving many injured. But I didn't witness this. Just goes to show that
while writing for me is always fun, publishing occasionally can be as well.

SHEM

Message Edited by ande on 06-25-2008 05:29 PM


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DawnR
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Hmmm, how do I address you?  Samuel?  Mr. Shem?  Dr. Bergman?  Dear Sir? 
 
Thank you for your posts - I especially enjoyed reading about your "unveiling" in Hudson on Flag Day.  I didn't realize there were such strong parallels to your hometown, and that, in fact, it was the clear inspiration for Columbia.  Great that your former schoolmate remembered you with that ancient science book, and that the townsfolk appreciated your sense of humor when you admonished them not to stand under lightposts!
 
It's interesting that you say the reading "sounded just like it did in my head".  I always enjoy hearing an author read his/her work, and later when I'm reading the book I 'hear' the author's voice (and may even slow down a bit and enjoy the story more).  I've tried to explain this to friends, and they just shake their heads about me "hearing voices" :smileyhappy:
 
Truly, hearing an author read often gives me a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the writing and the work that has been put into it. 
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Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Call me "Sam",
 
Good to hear back from you, the first time I've ever done this on-line.  Re "reading" out loud: I started in theatre, because it was a "live" art form, in the moment, and when I switched to novels (after the success of my first novel, THE HOUSE OF GOD, about medical internship in a hospital of that name) I missed the "live" part of it.  That's why I enjoy readings so much--it is not a solitary thing, but a mutual thing, laughter, silence of being moved, etc..  When my wife and I opened our play BILL W. AND DR. BOB Off Broadway last year, it was an astonishingly welcome shift.  It is a play about the founding of Alcoholics Anonymous, and it is framed with a prologue and epilogue modeled on an AA meeting, so when the first actor stands up and addresses the audience, "My name's Bill W. and I'm an alcoholic," if there are any alcoholics in the room they all shout out at him, "Hi Bill!"
 
Hard to get that kind of thing in fiction, but fiction has other joys.  Keep writing, and, about THE SPIRIT, "Pass it on."


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ande
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

A quick report from Samuel Shem on his reading in Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. last night. terrible storm, but big audience and NO breakage!
 
 

Dear All,

Last night I appeared at the Harvard Bookstore in Harvard Square, Cambridge Mass. It was a terrible night--blasting thunderstorms and gushing rains, and Janet and I watched the clock tick down in the empty room thinking that if two other people show up and we could find a deck of cards we could have a game and go home. Once I had done a book appearance at a Borders store and they had failed to take out an ad announcing my presence and I sat for an hour in front of this huge pile of books--I believe it was my second novel, FINE--and no one stopped, or even looked. Mothers ushered their children past me quickly, as if I were a molester. The store manager asked me six times if I'd like some coffee. From this kind of experience and others I have coined my LAW OF THE WRITER: THERE IS NO HUMILIATION BENEATH WHICH A WRITER CANNOT GO.

And then a miracle happened. The place filled up, so at the appointed hour there was standing room only. The Shem fans and newcomers had arrived! I was so relieved that I was relaxed, and as I read and talked and answered questions I had the sense that I am getting a sense of what THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE actually is as a novel--not as my novel but a novel--what the broader and deeper meanings are that an audience might be interested in. From the questions I learned the answer to some of my puzzlement about the book--realizing that while Orville comes back home as town doctor with the job of trying to heal the town, the town has the job of trying to heal him. Maybe obvious, but not to me until last night. And it was a homecoming of sorts: twenty or so years ago my first major public reading was at the Harvard Bookstore--and now it's up for sale.

What a thrill. Tomorrow I do a more difficult reading: an hour talk at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital at the Harvard Medical School, where my first novel THE HOUSE OF GOD is still remarkably popular, and mordantly controversial. Stay tuned.

SHEM

Melissa_W
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Shem, you should come read at the University of Iowa.  I think House of God is unofficial "required reading" for all the medical students there. :smileyvery-happy:  By the way, I'm about half way through House of the Spirits and I like it very much. 

ande wrote:
A quick report from Samuel Shem on his reading in Harvard Square, Cambridge, Mass. last night. terrible storm, but big audience and NO breakage!
 
 

Dear All,

Last night I appeared at the Harvard Bookstore in Harvard Square, Cambridge Mass. It was a terrible night--blasting thunderstorms and gushing rains, and Janet and I watched the clock tick down in the empty room thinking that if two other people show up and we could find a deck of cards we could have a game and go home. Once I had done a book appearance at a Borders store and they had failed to take out an ad announcing my presence and I sat for an hour in front of this huge pile of books--I believe it was my second novel, FINE--and no one stopped, or even looked. Mothers ushered their children past me quickly, as if I were a molester. The store manager asked me six times if I'd like some coffee. From this kind of experience and others I have coined my LAW OF THE WRITER: THERE IS NO HUMILIATION BENEATH WHICH A WRITER CANNOT GO.

And then a miracle happened. The place filled up, so at the appointed hour there was standing room only. The Shem fans and newcomers had arrived! I was so relieved that I was relaxed, and as I read and talked and answered questions I had the sense that I am getting a sense of what THE SPIRIT OF THE PLACE actually is as a novel--not as my novel but a novel--what the broader and deeper meanings are that an audience might be interested in. From the questions I learned the answer to some of my puzzlement about the book--realizing that while Orville comes back home as town doctor with the job of trying to heal the town, the town has the job of trying to heal him. Maybe obvious, but not to me until last night. And it was a homecoming of sorts: twenty or so years ago my first major public reading was at the Harvard Bookstore--and now it's up for sale.

What a thrill. Tomorrow I do a more difficult reading: an hour talk at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital at the Harvard Medical School, where my first novel THE HOUSE OF GOD is still remarkably popular, and mordantly controversial. Stay tuned.

SHEM




Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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Kegsoccer
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Shem, I was just in Boston a few weeks ago.  Sorry to have missed you!  Any chance you'll be in south Jersey, or Philly anytime soon?
Author
Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Dear Peds,
 
Thank you for the note.  I like to come to places I've never been, and Iowa is one of them.  I've given commencement speeches at about 50 USA and foreign med schools, but Iowa has never asked.  My image of you all are as enlightened group who put Obama on the map--and look where we are now!
 
And also the Iowa Writers' Workshop, an institution in itself.  I belong to the "Demos Writers' workshop, which has been meeting for almost twenty years but still has only the two founding members--Shem and my pal Mike Fredrickson a legal thriller writer--and meets exclusively at the Demos Greek Restaurant nearby which is distinguished by heavy tables bolted to the floor and chairs made of steel that also are so heavy that you can hardly lift them and therefore can't steal them.  The food is prepared by a United Nations of cooks, and the bill for the same dish seems to be calculated differently every time.
 
Invite me to Iowa.
 
SHEM  


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Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Dear Keg soccer,
 
I don't have plans at present, but one never knows.  I'm out of the USA for two weeks starting Saturday, in jungles and mountains, so I won't be posting until I get back. Keep reading.
 
SHEM


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ande
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Book Explorers:

DawnR, an energetic contributor to Book Explorers, was at Tuesday night's appearance/reading by Spirit author, Samuel Shem, in Cambridge, Mass. and she let me know -- and wants you to know -- that she blogged about it (and also reviewed the book on her blog). I've pasted in her account of the evening, below. And here are the links with photos and a review!

Thanks, DawnR!


http://sheistoofondofbooks.wordpress.com/2008/06/25/author-event-samuel-shem/
http://sheistoofondofbooks.wordpress.com/2008/06/16/the-spirit-of-the-place/


We braved a tremendous thunderstorm to join 40-50 others at the Harvard Book Store last night.  After previewing some other upcoming bookstore events, author Samuel Shem was introduced to a hearty round of applause. 

Shem joked that we got a ”real bargain”, with his free reading: Salman Rushdie will be at the store next month; tickets for that event are $5.  He gave a nod to independent bookstores (formerly the BookSense alliance, now IndieBound), and encouraged the audience to continue to support this vital arm of the community.

He read several passages from his newest novel, The Spirit of the Place (see my review here).  As usual, I gleaned even more from hearing the author read his work than I had from my own reading of it.  There is great foreshadowing in the opening scene, when one of the characters states, “in our very brokenness…is our wealth.”  Those who have read the book will understand how that sentiment echoes at the conclusion of the story.

Shem opened up the floor to questions from the audience.  He spoke a bit about influences from his own childhood, and from his work as a psychiatrist.  When asked for advice to a would-be author, Shem replied “I write because I can’t not write“, encouraging the novice to keep at it if she has a true hunger for writing.

After the reading and question/answer session, Shem graciously signed books.  It was a very enjoyable evening; I highly recommend that you investigate author events at your local bookstore.  Many store have readings and book discussion groups listed on their websites or via an e-newsletter.

 

Melissa_W
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

You're invited :smileyvery-happy:  Have you heard of the show "Live at Prairie Lights" (it runs on NPR I think - the local station WSUI AM900 carries it in eastern Iowa)?  The local independent bookstore Prairie Lights has been hosting writers from all different genres and levels for many years, from students at the Iowa Writer's Workshop and the International Writing Program to very popular authors like Jasper Fforde and Jeffrey Eugenides (Eugenides read for the program about 3 weeks after winning the Pulitzer for Middlesex).  I'm not sure who does their scheduling, but maybe your agent could make inquiries....
 
We're a funny bunch, we Iowans.   Iowa City is really a wonderful place; the University of Iowa has allowed the city to really expand and welcome people from not only every place in the US but virtually every country on the planet, every walk and orientation of life, and every opinion.  Sort of like a mini-Times Square set amid the cornfields.  The University traditionally chooses commencement speakers from within the academic community and the speakers are often chosen by members of the graduating class, so we are unique in that respect as well.

Samuel_Shem wrote:
Dear Peds,
 
Thank you for the note.  I like to come to places I've never been, and Iowa is one of them.  I've given commencement speeches at about 50 USA and foreign med schools, but Iowa has never asked.  My image of you all are as enlightened group who put Obama on the map--and look where we are now!
 
And also the Iowa Writers' Workshop, an institution in itself.  I belong to the "Demos Writers' workshop, which has been meeting for almost twenty years but still has only the two founding members--Shem and my pal Mike Fredrickson a legal thriller writer--and meets exclusively at the Demos Greek Restaurant nearby which is distinguished by heavy tables bolted to the floor and chairs made of steel that also are so heavy that you can hardly lift them and therefore can't steal them.  The food is prepared by a United Nations of cooks, and the bill for the same dish seems to be calculated differently every time.
 
Invite me to Iowa.
 
SHEM  



Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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harleyhoney
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

"Sam"
 
Thank you so much for being available to us this week.  I must say that you really did your job as a writer in pulling me into the characters and into that crazy character of a town "Columbia".  I found myself rooting and cheering for them, keeping my fingers crossed.  Especially good as I didn't really care for Orville in the beginning.  And thank you, too, for a variously costumed ghost.  The white gauzy gown is very boring.  Best wishes in your travels, any chance that you will make it out to the beautiful Pacific Northwest?
 
Nancy
"Somebody said they saw me swinging the world by the tail, bouncing over a white cloud, killing the blues."
Killing the Blues by Rowland Salley
Performed by Robert Plant and Alison Kraus on RAISING SAND
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Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Dear All,

Last night I appeared at the Harvard Bookstore in Harvard Square, Cambridge
Mass. It was a terrible night--blasting thunderstorms and gushing rains,
and Janet and I watched the clock tick down in the empty room thinking that
if two other people show up and we could find a deck of cards we could have
a game and go home. Once I had done a book appearance at a Borders store
and they had failed to take out an ad announcing my presence and I sat for
an hour in front of this huge pile of books--I believe it was my second
novel, FINE--and no one stopped, or even looked. Mothers ushered their
children past me quickly, as if I were a molester. The store manager asked
me six times if I'd like some coffee. From this kind of experience and
others I have coined my LAW OF THE WRITER: THERE IS NO HUMILIATION BENEATH
WHICH A WRITER CANNOT GO.

And then a miracle happened. The place filled up, so at the appointed hour
there was standing room only. The Shem fans and newcomers had arrived! I
was so relieved that I was relaxed, and as I read and talked and answered
questions I had the sense that I am getting a sense of what THE SPIRIT OF
THE PLACE actually is as a novel--not as my novel but a novel--what the
broader and deeper meanings are that an audience might be interested in.
From the questions I learned the answer to some of my puzzlement about the
book--realizing that while Orville comes back home as town doctor with the
job of trying to heal the town, the town has the job of trying to heal him.
Maybe obvious, but not to me until last night. And it was a homecoming of
sorts: twenty or so years ago my first major public reading was at the
Harvard Bookstore--and now it's up for sale.

What a thrill. Tomorrow I do a more difficult reading: an hour talk at the
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital at the Harvard Medical School, where my first
novel THE HOUSE OF GOD is still remarkably popular, and mordantly
controversial. Stay tuned.

SHEM


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Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Dear Dawn,
 
Many thanks for your words--it was great to meet you!  I'm so glad ytou think SPIRIT is a book club book.  All my novels have been word of mouth books, and now THE HOUSE OF GOD is up to 3 million.
Best,
 
Steve


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Samuel_Shem
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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Yes, in the past I did an appearance for my novel MOUNT MISERY at a bookstore in Seattle--the famous one I can't recall right now.  Invite me.  And pass it on, about SPIRIT.  Catch THE SPIRIT.
 
S


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Re: Say hello to Samuel Shem, author of The Spirit of the Place. He's here this week (June 22).

Maybe The Elliott Bay Book Company?  Great location in Pioneer Square, close to Seattle Waterfront and Pike Place Market.  They have lots of author readings.  Hummm... I think I need to make a trip into the "big" city this three day weekend.  Love those humungous $10 bunches of flowers from the Market. And I'll pass along THE SPIRIT.  I'm always sharing some of my favorite lines with a "you gotta read this book".
 
Nancy

Samuel_Shem wrote:
Yes, in the past I did an appearance for my novel MOUNT MISERY at a bookstore in Seattle--the famous one I can't recall right now.  Invite me.  And pass it on, about SPIRIT.  Catch THE SPIRIT.
 
S



"Somebody said they saw me swinging the world by the tail, bouncing over a white cloud, killing the blues."
Killing the Blues by Rowland Salley
Performed by Robert Plant and Alison Kraus on RAISING SAND