Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

You don't have to be a large-scale philanthropist to have a vision and to help change the world. Author Peter Karoff discusses how to give back with thought and passion with dozens of philanthropists (like the founder of EBay and AOL among many others). But even if the contents of your bank account are small you can have big dreams and ideas about how to create the world YOU want. Do you think this is possible? And what is your dream?
New User
marquezreader
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-19-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

The world I want is... one where there is no war, no cruelty to animals or children...oh and one where thoughtful books get as much attention as cookbooks.
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation



marquezreader wrote:
The world I want is... one where there is no war, no cruelty to animals or children...oh and one where thoughtful books get as much attention as cookbooks.




My perfect world would be everybody knowing how to spread love flowing all around the world and especially knowing how to love ourselves. That is all the world would need. To care and take care of everyone with love.
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

That is a beautiful thought -- and a heartwarming one on a very cold day in the Northeast. Thank you very much.

Does anyone want to share their thoughts about the world you want? Or something you've done that gets you closer to your vision of a better world?
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation



ande wrote:
That is a beautiful thought -- and a heartwarming one on a very cold day in the Northeast. Thank you very much.

Does anyone want to share their thoughts about the world you want? Or something you've done that gets you closer to your vision of a better world?




Oh! yes, I am in Central Virginia and it iced over this a.m. and caused lots of fender benders and overturned tractor and trailers in our area.
Inspired Contributor
katknit
Posts: 347
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Well, that's a big topic. I have a better idea about the America I want. I'd start with restoring decent manners, deleting all the celeb nonsense, improving the welfare of kids and animals, and making certain everyone had access to adequate health care. Just for starters.
No two persons ever read the same book. [Edmund Wilson]
Author
PeterKaroff
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎10-19-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Thank you for sharing your thoughts about the world you want. Just like no two persons ever read the same book, I learned when interviewing my group of "practical visionaries" that there are many different visions for an ideal world and strategies for achieving it. Some people are optimistic about our ability to create this world, while others are pessimistic. I believe that the world today is precariously balanced between a disastrous downward spiral and the real potential for the resolution of social dilemmas. Do you agree? Are you an optimist or a pessimist?

Peter Karoff


Learn more about The World We Want.
Frequent Contributor
luciadelabyss
Posts: 280
Registered: ‎10-30-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Hello! My best friend (who is in medical school) and I have been having this conversation. She turned 25 and I turned 50 this year, both important turning points in a life. She really wants to make a difference in the world; she has always wanted to be a doctor, but finds herself wishing she was closer to having children of her own. She finds herself thinking about mortality more, and wishing that people would be less self-destructive. She has always had firm goals and the intelligence and determination achieve them. I first met her when at age 17 she applied at the movie theater I managed.
We share a passionate interest in people; why they do the things they do. However, I contracted Wanderlust at an early age. I lost my parents young, and the only clear goal I had was to have an interesting life. :smileyhappy: I started a family as soon as I could, but single motherhood was to be my destiny. I have moved frequently and worked many places. I read obsessively, and would live in an old movie theater if I could! I was self-destructive and escaped that viscious cycle; I now try to help young people like me who have thinking brains but feel trapped in the system.
My friend and I both agree that overcoming a poor self-image is one of the hardest, and most necessary goals in life. The world we want would not have have substance abusers hurting themselves or their children. Everyone would be able to read & write and artistic ability would be encouraged. People would appreciate nature more, and take care of the air, water, and land better. One of the most profound ideas that I have ever read was this: Each person can only have a lasting affect on their own three feet of space; however, if we can keep a smile on our face and kind words in the air as we walk thru our day, keeping our 3ft of space full of positive energy...what would the world be like? :smileyhappy: As a final note...one of our favorite books is the Celestine Prophecy; we believe in synchronicity!
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Thanks for joining the Book Explorers conversation. How lucky you are to have such a great friendship! Difference in age often can be a barrier, but it doesn't have to be as you have shown. Are there other books you and your friend have both enjoyed that stimulated meaningful converation?
Inspired Scribe
IBIS
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

In this season of giving, there is a wonderful article in this Sunday's PARADE magazine on the generosity of average people like us.

Charitable donations in 2006 exceeded $295 billion... higher than the gross domestic product of Norway, and up $12 billion from the previous year.

68% of US households annually give something to charity.

According to the Giving USA Foundation, a whopping 65% of the funds for soup kitchens or free daycare come from families who earn less than $100,000...many of them a lot less.

The average American donates 2.6% of their income.

People earning less than $50,000 give an average of $971 annually; those in $50,000 to $100,000 range give $1,918.

And those earning about $100,000 conribute average of $3,975.

In 2005, we sent more than $7.4 billion to victims of Hurricane Katrina, the Pakistani earthquake and tsunami relief in Indonesia.

It's inspiring to see how our donations help make our world a better place to live.

Happy holidays, everyone.
IBIS
IBIS

"I am a part of everything that I have read."
Frequent Contributor
luciadelabyss
Posts: 280
Registered: ‎10-30-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Hello, sorry it took so long to reply...holidays & work fight for my time. :smileyhappy: I do feel quite fortunate in my best friend. Very rarely do we come up against any age related walls. :smileyhappy: Another author that I have encouraged her to read is Richard Bach; his first book was Johnathan Livingston Seagull. He has written several others since then, but nothing as popular. The theory of reincarnation runs thru most of his books. "The Bridge Across Forever" and "One" are about him and his wife; what they might be like without each other. He has also written one about what he would say if his forty yr-old self could talk to his 10 yr-old self. He also is interested in the idea of syncronicity; the idea that some people were meant to meet and how their lives change for the better because of it. His thoughts are usually upbeat, but he points out how thoughtless or negative actions have the same results. These books have been around for a long time; I don't think he has written in the last 10 yrs.
New User
Juiny
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-03-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Dear all,

This is my first time joining the book club as well as posting on a discussion board. This topic has interest me after watching an video clip on www.ted.com by Dave Goleman on Compassion. Compassion is the "sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others" as defined by the dictionary. And throughout the ages of times, we see the definition of act of compassion commonly through monetary contribution.

However, I also realised that in this modern time, sufferings and misfortunes often present itself in far more complex and are often non physical material related. Depending on the situations and events,monetary contributions are important to facilitate the assistance required. However, some of these pains can be elevated or avoided through simple acts of kindness of noticing and caring enough to listen or to offer just a smile.

In a cloud of rain, sometimes, a smile can bring in the sunshine.

I want a world where people take the simple step of noticing arnd them and to offer a glimpse of kindness through a simple non monetary act. I sincerely believe that this can spark off just a happier and peaceful world to be in.
Blogger
ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation

Juiny, thank you for sharing such a hopeful thought as the new year begins. Welcome to Book Explorers!
New User
biblioholic
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-03-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation



Juiny wrote:
Dear all,

This is my first time joining the book club as well as posting on a discussion board. This topic has interest me after watching an video clip on www.ted.com by Dave Goleman on Compassion. Compassion is the "sympathetic pity and concern for the sufferings or misfortunes of others" as defined by the dictionary. And throughout the ages of times, we see the definition of act of compassion commonly through monetary contribution.

However, I also realised that in this modern time, sufferings and misfortunes often present itself in far more complex and are often non physical material related. Depending on the situations and events,monetary contributions are important to facilitate the assistance required. However, some of these pains can be elevated or avoided through simple acts of kindness of noticing and caring enough to listen or to offer just a smile.

In a cloud of rain, sometimes, a smile can bring in the sunshine.

I want a world where people take the simple step of noticing arnd them and to offer a glimpse of kindness through a simple non monetary act. I sincerely believe that this can spark off just a happier and peaceful world to be in.




Dear Juiny,

The sentiment you expressed in your posting echoes my feelings. It takes very little to offer a smile or a kind word, or even just a greeting. Saying good morning or hi is all it takes sometimes to lift one's spirits, for both the speaker and the recipient. This is something we can all aspire to do. Although I have to admit I don't always feel very kindly and sometimes find myself glaring and growling. I don't like it when I do that, but I can always try to do better.

Biblioholic
New User
marilady
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎01-14-2008
0 Kudos

Re: The World We Want: Why you should join this conversation



PeterKaroff wrote:
Thank you for sharing your thoughts about the world you want. Just like no two persons ever read the same book, I learned when interviewing my group of "practical visionaries" that there are many different visions for an ideal world and strategies for achieving it. Some people are optimistic about our ability to create this world, while others are pessimistic. I believe that the world today is precariously balanced between a disastrous downward spiral and the real potential for the resolution of social dilemmas. Do you agree? Are you an optimist or a pessimist?

Peter Karoff




In answer to Peter Karoff, I am balanced somewhere between optimism and pessimism. I also see the world poised to accomplish great things, and also the potential for many things to go terribly wrong - another world war, or worse yet, nuclear war. I am a fan of Star Trek, and enjoy Gene Roddenberry's rather idealistic and utopian vision of the future. We have the possibility of getting closer of that place, where everyone is accepted irregardless of personal differences (aside from the Ferengi perhaps). However... I see a lot of negative behavior around me and in the world. I also enjoy Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series which (in the 2nd through 4th books) takes a rather pessimistic view of humanity and its evolution. In fact, we don't evolve. THe same pettiness, squabbling, power-hungry, money-loving, unethical people exist in Clarke's world as exist now. I think realistically such people will always exist. I don't know that it is possible for humanity to evolve to that kind of idealistic world that Roddenberry presents, much as I would like it to happen. At least not for billions of years, at which point the Sun will expire.

That being said, I do think we each have the potential to cause positive change on our immediate surroundings, if not the larger world, be it due to recycling more, taking public transportation, voting, getting involved somehow, instead of just sitting on our duffs in front of the computer or TV letting life pass us by... as Margaret Mead said (and I paraphrase), One small group of committed people can change the world. Hopefully that's reasonably close to the real statement.