Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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ande
Posts: 442
Registered: ‎04-07-2007
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Re: Book covers

I admire the care with which LLL made her selection. Do you ever judge a book by its cover -- and do you ever regret it?
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lynnstegner
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎09-11-2007
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Re: Book covers

Hi Ande,

I agree, there was so much thought, so many authentic sensibilities brought to bear upon LLL's choice of editions for On the Road. It was an edition, though; she had already decided to read the book and only needed to determine which of the covers she wanted to live with for a while. I don't think a cover has ever stopped me from reading a book, though I have been mystified by some. For instance, I have a first edition copy of Robert Penn Warren's World Enough and Time. Most of the cover is taken up with the title and author's name, but the bottom quarter shows some highly romanticized drawings of the men and women characters in passionate poses. Not exactly how I would characterize the novel. One of the first paperback editions of Angle of Repose (by Wallace Stegner)is similar in its leanings toward the Hollywood Western romance. But what I noticed mostly about the novels of the twentieth century, say the first two-thirds, is that they are largely without pictorial expressions of theme; they are word designs for title and author. And another thing I noticed was that late-century novels increasingly used art work, and even later, photographs of the setting or some kind of montage of symbols meant to embody theme. There is one thing that does actually stop me in my tracks: gold, embossed letters on a cover. To me, that means unequivocally that this is not a book I can take seriously.


Learn more about Because a Fire Was in My Head.
Inspired Scribe
IBIS
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
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Re: Book covers: razor sharp die cuts

[ Edited ]
I agree about gold-metalic inks on covers. Especially when the letters are embossed, and the ink starts flaking off, and I get gold flakes on my fingers.

I get anxious around covers with special die-cuts. These odd shapes are sometimes razor sharp, and they cut off images. I feel forced to "interact" with the cover, and lift up the flap to see the entire cover image. If I wanted papercuts, I can get them for free at the office.

Some of these special cuts catch onto things, like brand-new pantyhose(!) And the cover gets torn. I find sections of the torn-off cover underneath car seats, and sofas.

Just another pet peeve.

Message Edited by IBIS on 10-15-2007 08:06 PM
IBIS

"I am a part of everything that I have read."
Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Re: Book covers


lynnstegner wrote:
There is one thing that does actually stop me in my tracks: gold, embossed letters on a cover. To me, that means unequivocally that this is not a book I can take seriously.



Gold-embossed covers have a place in the bigger scheme of things. Granted, it's often a lazy way to get a reader's attention, however, entire genres rely on it and that can't be completely discounted. Of course, maybe I should bring my argument to the thrillers board. :-)


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New User
marquezreader
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-19-2007
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Re: Share your thoughts with us

I'm just starting Lynn Stegner's book, but the poem gave me the chills. How is it that I am unfamiliar with that poem?
Author
lynnstegner
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎09-11-2007
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Re: Share your thoughts with us

Marquezreader:

Isn't it an amazing poem? It is one of Yeats' earliest, 1906 I think, and has actually fallen into the public domain. There are so many interwoven themes -- yearning, seeking, love and unrequited love, the mysteries of illusion and delusion and the sometimes beautiful benefits of both, the preeminence of the search over the thing sought. I can think of a dozen novels that might have taken their titles from this single poem.


Learn more about Because a Fire Was in My Head.
Author
lynnstegner
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎09-11-2007
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Re: Book covers: razor sharp die cuts

IBIS, your exegesis of cutout covers and flaking gold flakes ought to be forwarded to every cover design department at every publishing house. Having myself found torn pieces of these "innovative" covers on my bedside table or purse pocket or desk edge, I sympathize with the problem. I had not considered the "interactive" aspect; yes, the words on the page and the character of the writer are what we choose to interact with when we purchase a book.


Learn more about Because a Fire Was in My Head.
Author
lynnstegner
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎09-11-2007
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Re: Book covers

Hi Maria,

It was good to hear your side of the matter, when it comes to gold-embossed covers and their rightful niche in the greater scheme of things. At the very least, they serve to distinguish the genres even if for some of us they attract negative attention. Personally, I'd like gold leaf . . .


Learn more about Because a Fire Was in My Head.
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sfendick
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-20-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

i'm reading hatchet haver never read it lol
Inspired Correspondent
Maria_H
Posts: 791
Registered: ‎07-19-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?



sfendick wrote:
i'm reading hatchet haver never read it lol




Who or what is hatchet haver?


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New User
EnglishMajorTTU
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-23-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

A really good book that all should read is called "The Uncommon Reader" by Alan Bennett. This british novella is one of Bennett's greatest works. I absolutely loved it!!!
Contributor
dhargett
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎12-12-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

[ Edited ]
Maria I think they just meant the book Hatchet. I think they added an r to their have never. I am just about to start reading The Reckoning now that today was my last day for fall semester at school. I started this book in 11th grade but never got to finish it because of finals and stuff. I could never remember the name and I finally managed to find it with the help of the librarian. I remember it being amazing; I guess I'll see.

Message Edited by dhargett on 12-12-2007 11:41 PM
New User
aggie_freak
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

I LOVE Hatchet!!!!
I think I read it like 3 times before I was out of high school. Maybe I should read that one again!! It's so quick and yet so profound!
jennifer
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aggie_freak
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

On the subject of what we are reading.
I am currently reading Sense and Sensibility because I had never read it and got it in my head to read all of Jane Austin's completed novels back-to-back. Don't ask why. I have no idea! Anyway, I really like Pride and Prejudice, but am finding Sense and Sensibility hard to get into. Is it my frame of mind? Is it really just not written as well? Or is the subject just not as interesting to me? Anyone have any ideas?
I have resolved to finish it no matter what because I never quit reading a book once I start it (just one of those weird quirks I have). I just seem to doing it with much more difficulty than the quickness and ease I had with Pride and Prejudice.
jennifer
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading next?



aggie_freak wrote:
On the subject of what we are reading.
I am currently reading Sense and Sensibility because I had never read it and got it in my head to read all of Jane Austin's completed novels back-to-back. Don't ask why. I have no idea! Anyway, I really like Pride and Prejudice, but am finding Sense and Sensibility hard to get into. Is it my frame of mind? Is it really just not written as well? Or is the subject just not as interesting to me? Anyone have any ideas?
I have resolved to finish it no matter what because I never quit reading a book once I start it (just one of those weird quirks I have). I just seem to doing it with much more difficulty than the quickness and ease I had with Pride and Prejudice.




I have the answer for you! Because they are all superier reads and it keens up your imagination thirty fore. I love Jane Austin and read them often also.
Frequent Contributor
Jody1S
Posts: 96
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading next?

I also love Jane Austen. It's been awhile since I've read anything by her though. Maybe I'll read persuasion after I get done with what I'm reading now. I usually have at least three books that I'm reading at the same time. It depends on my mood which one I pick up. I'm almost done with one, so I'll go to my old copy of Persuasion for the next read.
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading next?



IBIS wrote:
I'll be very involved with B&N October's reading list. Here is my eclectic list:

Lyn Stegner's BECAUSE A FIRE WAS IN MY HEAD. I listened to your review on NPR.
Dalia Sofer's THE SEPTEMBERS OF SHIRAZ. I heard your review of this book as well.

Claire Messud's THE EMPEROR'S CHILDREN.
Laura Moriarty's THE REST OF HER LIFE.

The Crime Book Club will be discussing Raymond Chandler's classics: THE BIG SLEEP, FAREWELL MY LOVELY and THE LONG GOODBYE. I can't wait to sink my teeth into his pulp stories as well.

The Mystery Club will be discussing Ira Levin's A KISS BEFORE DYING. I'm also watching both movie versions of it for comparison.

What can I say. I have no life!




Yes, it sounds like you have a great life!
Frequent Contributor
karinlib
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What are you reading next?



ande wrote:
No life?? If I've got it right, music and reading are two great passions and pastimes of yours. What's wrong with that? Will others weigh in on this matter, please.





I think there is no life if books and music aren't a part of it. I have to read almost as much as I have to breathe. There is nothing better in this world that reading a truly satisfying book.
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FrankieD
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎12-16-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

Just the other day I started to read A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini and I've found myself wrapped up in it already. The setting is Afghanistan from the Russian invasion through the Taliban...and the characters are very interesting and believable.
All in all an interesting read so far.
FrankieD :smileyhappy:
" The longer I live...the more beautiful life becomes."
- Frank Lloyd Wright
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Timbuktu1
Posts: 1,572
Registered: ‎12-31-2007
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Re: What are you reading next?

I'm reading The Republic and The Odyssey, at the same time. I love the way the concepts mesh. I'm also reading support material. I loved The Greek Way by Edith Hamilton. Bertrand Russell's book on Western Philosophy was helpful. I have 3 different translations of The Odyssey and it's fun to see the differences. I'm also listening to the Teaching Company tapes. There's also a wonderful book by David Denby, forget the exact title, about his time in a great books program at Columbia. Fascinating to read his reactions to the texts and compare them to my own.