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PerfidiousAlbion
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Registered: ‎06-30-2008
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Brontes to Gaskell to Dickens to Collins to Conan Doyle to Gissing--Wow!

I love 19th C authors especially those authors listed above. Is anything better losing oneself in another time and place? My favorite 19th C. authors begin and end with the Bronte sisters, hands down.

Last December I visited The Bronte Parsonage...it was awe inspiring. To actually see before my eyes first editions of Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was too much to comprehend.

After reading everything I could on the Brontes for the past 20 years, and especially Juliet Barker's in-depth biography I was mesmerized when I entered the Parsonage. I still prefer Elizabeth Gaskell's "The Life of Charlotte Bronte"---in addition to Gaskell's own books.

And English mysteries are superior, wouldn't you agree? Even an American writer such as Elizabeth George can create beautiful prose with her wonderful books set in England. Her protagonist Chief Inspector Lynley and the enigmatic Barbara Havers--who is the draw for me to keep reading----the author's extensive vocabulary, the descriptions of various places throughout the Kingdom and her cleverly crafted mysteries are just fantastic!
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Brontes to Gaskell to Dickens to Collins to Conan Doyle to Gissing--Wow!

As a lover of the Brontes, are you aware that we have just started a discussion of Anne Bronte's Agnes Grey in the Literature by Women book group here on B&N? Come join us!

PerfidiousAlbion wrote:
I love 19th C authors especially those authors listed above. Is anything better losing oneself in another time and place? My favorite 19th C. authors begin and end with the Bronte sisters, hands down.

Last December I visited The Bronte Parsonage...it was awe inspiring. To actually see before my eyes first editions of Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was too much to comprehend.

After reading everything I could on the Brontes for the past 20 years, and especially Juliet Barker's in-depth biography I was mesmerized when I entered the Parsonage. I still prefer Elizabeth Gaskell's "The Life of Charlotte Bronte"---in addition to Gaskell's own books.

And English mysteries are superior, wouldn't you agree? Even an American writer such as Elizabeth George can create beautiful prose with her wonderful books set in England. Her protagonist Chief Inspector Lynley and the enigmatic Barbara Havers--who is the draw for me to keep reading----the author's extensive vocabulary, the descriptions of various places throughout the Kingdom and her cleverly crafted mysteries are just fantastic!


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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Brontes to Gaskell to Dickens to Collins to Conan Doyle to Gissing--Wow!

[ Edited ]
Yes, do join us!
 
I hope you have also read some biographical literature which is post-Gaskell, like Lock & Dixons Man of Sorrow : Life, Letters & Times of Patrick Bronte and Winifred Gerin's biography of Branwell Bronte (which is worth comparing with Daphne Du Maurier's novel The Infernal World of Branwell Bronte.  The lives of the father and the brother throw another light on the sisters. 
 
(My most lasting memory of the Parsonage at Haworth, which I know well, is that of Charlotte's adult 'best' dress which would fit an 11 year old very thin, possibly anorexic, child of today.  It was very sad:smileysad:. )    
 

Everyman wrote:
As a lover of the Brontes, are you aware that we have just started a discussion of Anne Bronte's Agnes Grey in the Literature by Women book group here on B&N? Come join us!

PerfidiousAlbion wrote:
I love 19th C authors especially those authors listed above. Is anything better losing oneself in another time and place? My favorite 19th C. authors begin and end with the Bronte sisters, hands down.

Last December I visited The Bronte Parsonage...it was awe inspiring. To actually see before my eyes first editions of Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall was too much to comprehend.

After reading everything I could on the Brontes for the past 20 years, and especially Juliet Barker's in-depth biography I was mesmerized when I entered the Parsonage. I still prefer Elizabeth Gaskell's "The Life of Charlotte Bronte"---in addition to Gaskell's own books.

And English mysteries are superior, wouldn't you agree? Even an American writer such as Elizabeth George can create beautiful prose with her wonderful books set in England. Her protagonist Chief Inspector Lynley and the enigmatic Barbara Havers--who is the draw for me to keep reading----the author's extensive vocabulary, the descriptions of various places throughout the Kingdom and her cleverly crafted mysteries are just fantastic!







Message Edited by Choisya on 07-03-2008 01:04 PM
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