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IlanaSimons
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Re: mix



ziki wrote:


pmath wrote:The main problem is that we're not discussing P&P on a dedicated board, so the discussions threads can easily get lost and forgotten, with other British Classics threads still being active.




That is definitely a disadvantage when different books get mixed up, I agree with you. I see no solution.....but Bob managed to separate Moby Dick and that was a great luck for us all. If all these books get bundled into a general discussion it will make it pretty impossible to handle, plus very old posts get mixed with new ones etc.

ziki





B&N has been seriously considering our options in how to move reader-led discussions to boards of their own. Just know that this discussion is taking place. We don't want to rush to decide on any one new format...but we are planning ways of separating out book groups. Stay tuned for possible new plans.
Ilana



Ilana
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost

So the key is to become primitive? Get in touch with my primal side? :smileyhappy: That's going to be interesting. I'm planning to join this discussion, as I find the concept of the book/poem extremely interesting - the fall of man and the angle of the fallen angel. I figure that if I flounder, I have all of you to guide, explain, & assist.



Everyman wrote:
LizzieAnn wrote: I never read it at all, and I'll be the novice of the group. It sounds a bit intimidating, and I'm a bit apprehensive of joining you all in that discussion.

Piffle, if you'll excuse the expression. You'll be fantastic there as you are everywhere. Once you get into PL, you realize that the sense of intimidation is more ephemeral than real.

Poetry is much older, and much more ingrained into the human psyche than prose. Prose fiction (as opposed to history, philosophy, etc.) is a relative recent development. Once you get back to your more primitive self you'll quickly get into reading epic poetry.

One thing we should all keep in mind is that epic poetry is a very different thing from lyric poetry. I'll get more into this in the PL thread, but for the time being think of PL (and other epics) as novels in verse, not as poems in the way we normally think of poetry.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost

I very much like the idea of section at a time. Even though I may be the only one on the novice level, I know that everyone will be willing to help me along. :smileywink: Oddly enough, it's at this stage of my life (& my two children are in their mid-20s), that I've decided to venture into these deeper tomes! (Don't those las two words sound like I belong? :smileyhappy: )



Laurel wrote:
Liz, with your brilliance you'll have no problem at all with Paradise Lost. It can be read on several levels and for a lifetime, but I think we should just take it a section at a time and get the best things from each section.



LizzieAnn wrote:
Reading Austen always sound good to me. :smileyhappy: Just let me know when to be there, and I will be ~ with bells ringing!

I also like Laurel's idea of taking time with Paradise Lost. I never read it at all, and I'll be the novice of the group. :smileytongue: It sounds a bit intimidating, and I'm a bit apprehensive of joining you all in that discussion.

If PL is going to take that much time, it may be a good idea to add another discussion. After all, I know that I do more than one discussion a month now, as I know several of you do as well.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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LizzieAnn
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British English

[ Edited ]
And sennight! I love to watch BBC-America and note all the differences in American & British English. By the way, does anyone know what an "articulated lorry" is? I know lorry is truck, but I'm not sure what's meant by that phrase?

It was George Bernard Shaw who said: "England and America are two countries separated by a common language." :smileyhappy:



Laurel wrote:
Oh, I love doing things fortnightly! I don't know why fortnights didn't make it into American English.



Choisya wrote:
I think having a vote for all the reader moderated book sugggestions would be a good idea because that would ensure having a reasonable number of readers in the book discussion democratically decided upon. Perhaps we should have a 'Voting Thread for British (European?) Classics' where we could post our preferences as to titles and order of reading. These to be counted up at the end of a fortnight?

I think it is important too that we try to keep a balance of 'light and dark', 'easy and difficult' and so we should think about that when we vote.

Message Edited by Choisya on 02-18-200708:31 AM






Message Edited by LizzieAnn on 02-18-200702:24 PM

Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Laurel
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Re: mix



IlanaSimons wrote:


B&N has been seriously considering our options in how to move reader-led discussions to boards of their own. Just know that this discussion is taking place. We don't want to rush to decide on any one new format...but we are planning ways of separating out book groups. Stay tuned for possible new plans.
Ilana




Thanks, Ilana. I realize how something like that could get away from you if it's not carefully planned.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Laurel
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Re: Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost

Yup. I just went back to read some of my notes on first reading Paradise Lost. Boy was I green! And that was only three years ago, when I was umpty.



LizzieAnn wrote:
I very much like the idea of section at a time. Even though I may be the only one on the novice level, I know that everyone will be willing to help me along. :smileywink: Oddly enough, it's at this stage of my life (& my two children are in their mid-20s), that I've decided to venture into these deeper tomes! (Don't those las two words sound like I belong? :smileyhappy: )



Laurel wrote:
Liz, with your brilliance you'll have no problem at all with Paradise Lost. It can be read on several levels and for a lifetime, but I think we should just take it a section at a time and get the best things from each section.



LizzieAnn wrote:
Reading Austen always sound good to me. :smileyhappy: Just let me know when to be there, and I will be ~ with bells ringing!

I also like Laurel's idea of taking time with Paradise Lost. I never read it at all, and I'll be the novice of the group. :smileytongue: It sounds a bit intimidating, and I'm a bit apprehensive of joining you all in that discussion.

If PL is going to take that much time, it may be a good idea to add another discussion. After all, I know that I do more than one discussion a month now, as I know several of you do as well.





"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost

Everyone is green at some point, right? So be it! :smileyvery-happy:



Laurel wrote:
Yup. I just went back to read some of my notes on first reading Paradise Lost. Boy was I green! And that was only three years ago, when I was umpty.



LizzieAnn wrote:
I very much like the idea of section at a time. Even though I may be the only one on the novice level, I know that everyone will be willing to help me along. :smileywink: Oddly enough, it's at this stage of my life (& my two children are in their mid-20s), that I've decided to venture into these deeper tomes! (Don't those last two words sound like I belong? :smileyhappy: )


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Laurel
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Re: Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost

'Twas our salad days.



LizzieAnn wrote:
Everyone is green at some point, right? So be it! :smileyvery-happy:



Laurel wrote:
Yup. I just went back to read some of my notes on first reading Paradise Lost. Boy was I green! And that was only three years ago, when I was umpty.



LizzieAnn wrote:
I very much like the idea of section at a time. Even though I may be the only one on the novice level, I know that everyone will be willing to help me along. :smileywink: Oddly enough, it's at this stage of my life (& my two children are in their mid-20s), that I've decided to venture into these deeper tomes! (Don't those last two words sound like I belong? :smileyhappy: )





"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: British English


LizzieAnn wrote:
ABy the way, does anyone know what an "articulated lorry" is? I know lorry is truck, but I'm not sure what's meant by that phrase?

I believe it's what we would call a tractor-trailer, wher the motor part and the cargo part are separable.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Choisya
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Re: British English

Articulated = jointed. Artic lorries aren't just separable but they have an incredible ability to turn practically on their own spot. We also have articulated buses over here and they can be quite scary if you are in the joined on bit going around a tight corner:smileysurprised:.




Everyman wrote:

LizzieAnn wrote:
ABy the way, does anyone know what an "articulated lorry" is? I know lorry is truck, but I'm not sure what's meant by that phrase?

I believe it's what we would call a tractor-trailer, wher the motor part and the cargo part are separable.


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Choisya
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Re: British English

[ Edited ]
LOL. How about Tuesday week then, a week last Wednesday, or a fortnight cum Saturday? :smileyvery-happy:




LizzieAnn wrote:
And sennight! I love to watch BBC-America and note all the differences in American & British English. By the way, does anyone know what an "articulated lorry" is? I know lorry is truck, but I'm not sure what's meant by that phrase?

It was George Bernard Shaw who said: "England and America are two countries separated by a common language." :smileyhappy:



Laurel wrote:
Oh, I love doing things fortnightly! I don't know why fortnights didn't make it into American English.



Choisya wrote:
I think having a vote for all the reader moderated book sugggestions would be a good idea because that would ensure having a reasonable number of readers in the book discussion democratically decided upon. Perhaps we should have a 'Voting Thread for British (European?) Classics' where we could post our preferences as to titles and order of reading. These to be counted up at the end of a fortnight?

I think it is important too that we try to keep a balance of 'light and dark', 'easy and difficult' and so we should think about that when we vote.

Message Edited by Choisya on 02-18-200708:31 AM



Message Edited by Choisya on 02-19-200709:06 AM

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Choisya
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Re: Community Thread

[ Edited ]
Not since my early teens Ilana. I have since done so much factual writing of reports, etc that my style is now far too prosaic for fiction:smileysad: I started an autobiography for my grandchildren when I retired in 2001 but rarely add anything to it.




IlanaSimons wrote:
and Choisya...do you try your hand at fiction, yourself?

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-01-200607:59 PM



Message Edited by Choisya on 02-19-200710:07 AM

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Choisya
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Re: English Icons

British classics readers might like to look at this Icons of England website:-

http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons
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Re: English Icons

Great site, Choisya: thanks! I've bookmarked it.


Choisya wrote:
British classics readers might like to look at this Icons of England website:-

http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons

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LizzieAnn
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Re: British English

That's clear. Thank you!



Everyman wrote:

LizzieAnn wrote:
ABy the way, does anyone know what an "articulated lorry" is? I know lorry is truck, but I'm not sure what's meant by that phrase?

I believe it's what we would call a tractor-trailer, wher the motor part and the cargo part are separable.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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LizzieAnn
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Re: British English

I believe I know what you mean. Around Manhattan some time ago I remember seeing buses that just might fit your description. It looked like two buses joined the the middle by an accordian-like section. They were terrifying when making a turn!




Choisya wrote:
Articulated = jointed. Artic lorries aren't just separable but they have an incredible ability to turn practically on their own spot. We also have articulated buses over here and they can be quite scary if you are in the joined on bit going around a tight corner:smileysurprised:.




Everyman wrote:

LizzieAnn wrote:
ABy the way, does anyone know what an "articulated lorry" is? I know lorry is truck, but I'm not sure what's meant by that phrase?

I believe it's what we would call a tractor-trailer, wher the motor part and the cargo part are separable.





Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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For Ilana: Plans for April/May Discussion of MANSFIELD PARK

Thanks, Ilana: I'll post a suggested schedule for MP around March 24 (to give participants three weeks to purchase the novel, if necessary) for a 48-day discussion, from April 14 through May 31, 2007.


IlanaSimons wrote:
This sounds ok to me. Let's keep it as a tentative schedule and re-pole the crowds in late March.

Laurel wrote:
I think it would work. That way, people who come in a little late would not feel that they could never catch up. Let's see what Ilana thinks.

pmath wrote:
Thanks, L! Yes, and in this case, we could also read and discuss Mansfield Park slowly, one chapter per day (there are 48 altogether), so those who would like to participate in both discussions can comfortably do so, if they wish.

Laurel wrote:
Paradise Lost should take at least twelve weeks--a week per book. Having something lighter at the same time is a good idea, I think. Perhaps have only Paradise Lost the first two weeks in April, along with the selections that Ilana and Bob will do, and then add an Austen the third week of April.
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PaulK
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Re: For Ilana: Plans for April/May Discussion of MANSFIELD PARK

Thanks, Ilana: I'll post a suggested schedule for MP around March 24 (to give participants three weeks to purchase the novel, if necessary) for a 48-day discussion, from April 14 through May 31, 2007.

Ilana or Pmath, can you summarize what the current schedule is? I am getting a little confused.

I will certainly join Mansfield Park and the Double, and plan to make an attempt at Paradise Lost. I bought the book and Spark Notes yesterday.
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KristyR
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Re: Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost



LizzieAnn wrote:
I very much like the idea of section at a time. Even though I may be the only one on the novice level, I know that everyone will be willing to help me along. :smileywink: Oddly enough, it's at this stage of my life (& my two children are in their mid-20s), that I've decided to venture into these deeper tomes! (Don't those las two words sound like I belong? :smileyhappy: )



Laurel wrote:
Liz, with your brilliance you'll have no problem at all with Paradise Lost. It can be read on several levels and for a lifetime, but I think we should just take it a section at a time and get the best things from each section.



LizzieAnn wrote:
Reading Austen always sound good to me. :smileyhappy: Just let me know when to be there, and I will be ~ with bells ringing!

I also like Laurel's idea of taking time with Paradise Lost. I never read it at all, and I'll be the novice of the group. :smileytongue: It sounds a bit intimidating, and I'm a bit apprehensive of joining you all in that discussion.

If PL is going to take that much time, it may be a good idea to add another discussion. After all, I know that I do more than one discussion a month now, as I know several of you do as well.





You won't be the only novice! I read bits and pieces in high school, but never more than that. I'm looking forward to this discussion and to learning from everyone else.
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LizzieAnn
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Mansfield Park & Paradise Lost

It'll be great to have a fellow newbie!



KristyR wrote:


LizzieAnn wrote:
I very much like the idea of section at a time. Even though I may be the only one on the novice level, I know that everyone will be willing to help me along. :smileywink: Oddly enough, it's at this stage of my life (& my two children are in their mid-20s), that I've decided to venture into these deeper tomes! (Don't those las two words sound like I belong? :smileyhappy: )



Laurel wrote:
Liz, with your brilliance you'll have no problem at all with Paradise Lost. It can be read on several levels and for a lifetime, but I think we should just take it a section at a time and get the best things from each section.



LizzieAnn wrote:
Reading Austen always sound good to me. :smileyhappy: Just let me know when to be there, and I will be ~ with bells ringing!

I also like Laurel's idea of taking time with Paradise Lost. I never read it at all, and I'll be the novice of the group. :smileytongue: It sounds a bit intimidating, and I'm a bit apprehensive of joining you all in that discussion.

If PL is going to take that much time, it may be a good idea to add another discussion. After all, I know that I do more than one discussion a month now, as I know several of you do as well.





You won't be the only novice! I read bits and pieces in high school, but never more than that. I'm looking forward to this discussion and to learning from everyone else.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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