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We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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IlanaSimons
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Re: Good news!



Choisya wrote:
I will be meeting Danielle and her boys in Peterborough on Monday afternoon at 2pm:smileyhappy: I am taking them for a formal English tea at a very nice, old fashioned hotel. Isn't it exciting - my first B&N get-together!





Choisya wrote:
I heard from both Danielle in France and Marcia in America yesterday that they are coming to England shortly and want to meet up. I have met quite a few cyber-friends from English gardening websites but this is the first time I will be meeting 'foreigners', which is exciting:smileyhappy:







wow! that is wonderful to hear



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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ELee
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Re: Good news!


Choisya wrote:
I will be meeting Danielle and her boys in Peterborough on Monday afternoon at 2pm:smileyhappy: I am taking them for a formal English tea at a very nice, old fashioned hotel. Isn't it exciting - my first B&N get-together!





(I'm so jealous!)

Have a wonderful time!!!
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Choisya
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Re: Good news!

Thanks E Lee. Isn't it good that so many of us have become such good friends over several years and can sometimes translate that cyber-friendship into reality? It is one of the things, for me, that makes B&N so valuable despite all the software frustrations and administrative difficulties. For retirees like me who are no longer out in the big wide, working world, it is an invaluable resource. Why, I've even got to quite like sparring with Everyman and I very nearly understand Ziki and Chad's posts - now if only Pmath wasn't costing me so much money.....:smileyvery-happy::smileyvery-happy:



ELee wrote:

Choisya wrote:
I will be meeting Danielle and her boys in Peterborough on Monday afternoon at 2pm:smileyhappy: I am taking them for a formal English tea at a very nice, old fashioned hotel. Isn't it exciting - my first B&N get-together!





(I'm so jealous!)

Have a wonderful time!!!



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LizzieAnn
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Robin Hood

Has anyone ever read any stories or books on Robin Hood that they would recommend. I've always been fascinated by the story of Robin Hood, and was watching the BBC-America previews for the 13-week series that's premiering here Saturday. I've seen Robin Hood movies, tv shows/films, and even the Disney cartoon movie with my children when they were very young, but have never actually read anything on Robin Hood.

While I eagerly anticipate the television series, I would appreciate any book that you may suggest.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Choisya
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Re: Robin Hood

Which myth do you prefer LizzieAnn?

http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons/collection/robin-hood/biography/early-british-mythology-finished

Here is a statue of Robin Hood outside Nottingham Castle. It was sculpted when I was a young married woman and caused much controversy because he is not tall and handsome. However, the sculptor said that he had based it on research into the height, clothing etc of men of that time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood

There is a list of books, films etc on this US university website devoted to Robin Hood:-

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/CAMELOT/rh/rhhome.stm




LizzieAnn wrote:
Has anyone ever read any stories or books on Robin Hood that they would recommend. I've always been fascinated by the story of Robin Hood, and was watching the BBC-America previews for the 13-week series that's premiering here Saturday. I've seen Robin Hood movies, tv shows/films, and even the Disney cartoon movie with my children when they were very young, but have never actually read anything on Robin Hood.

While I eagerly anticipate the television series, I would appreciate any book that you may suggest.


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LizzieAnn
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Re: Robin Hood

I hadn't realized that there was more than one myth. I suppose the one I'm familiar with is the most common one - the earl, an outlaw, fought in the Crusades, Prince John and the Sheriff, living in the forest, caring for the poor, robbing the rich, Sir Guy, etc.

That statue is against type for me. He doesn't necessarily have to be that tall, but he should be attractive at least! :smileyvery-happy:

That last site is great Choisya - so much information. Thank you! I never realized that there were that many films & shows on Robin Hood.

Did you happen to watch the series on BBC One back in the fall? I'm looking forward to seeing the first episode on Saturday.



Choisya wrote:
Which myth do you prefer LizzieAnn?

http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons/collection/robin-hood/biography/early-british-mythology-finished

Here is a statue of Robin Hood outside Nottingham Castle. It was sculpted when I was a young married woman and caused much controversy because he is not tall and handsome. However, the sculptor said that he had based it on research into the height, clothing etc of men of that time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood

There is a list of books, films etc on this US university website devoted to Robin Hood:-

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/CAMELOT/rh/rhhome.stm



Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
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Re: Robin Hood



LizzieAnn wrote:
That statue is against type for me. He doesn't necessarily have to be that tall, but he should be attractive at least!

Absolutely. Would the noble and beautiful Maid Marian gone gaga over a guy who looked like that?
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Robin Hood

Not a chance.

The part of the legend is that he was handsome, strong, and courageous and she was beautiful and brave!



Everyman wrote:


LizzieAnn wrote:
That statue is against type for me. He doesn't necessarily have to be that tall, but he should be attractive at least!

Absolutely. Would the noble and beautiful Maid Marian gone gaga over a guy who looked like that?


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Thread

A good cup of tea is the most satisfactory accompaniment to a good book (a cat on the lap and, in winter, a fire are the other two critical accompaniments).

Just as we like knowing something about the authors we read, it can be fun to read something about the teas we drink. My tea company, Upton Tea, has articles on the tea trade in its quarterly newsletters/catalogs, and the most recent was particularly interesting, being the history of the opening of the sea route to India.

An interesting aside is that Britain was not the first nation to have an empire on which the sun never set. Portugal beat them to it. Take that, you English!

These articles are as much a delight to read as their tea is to drink. You can read their articles on their web site. Go to
http://www.uptontea.com
The current installment should show up on the home page: go to Read the Spring 2007 Article. Or if for some reason you wind up at a different place, click on the Information tab at the top and then the Current Newsletter Homepage. This is the third article in a series on the history of tea; their catalog essays (almost all of which are worth reading) are chronological, so look on the bottom for the most recent entries.

And while you're there, order a bit of tea. Personally, I find the best way to enjoy loose tea is to make it a mug at a time using a mug strainer (under Accessories/Infusers) since it gives the loose tea the greatest room to bloom while still making it easy to remove the tea leaves from the cup, and makes sure that each cup is as fresh as possible.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Community Thread

Thanks for the site - it was interesting to read. Portugal isn't what comes to mind when I think of tea. Now, I know that I've been missing something. :smileyhappy:
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Choisya
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Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Robin Hood

No - I didn't watch the series. I have had my fill of him over the years, having spent my teenage years in Nottingham:smileyhappy:




LizzieAnn wrote:
I hadn't realized that there was more than one myth. I suppose the one I'm familiar with is the most common one - the earl, an outlaw, fought in the Crusades, Prince John and the Sheriff, living in the forest, caring for the poor, robbing the rich, Sir Guy, etc.

That statue is against type for me. He doesn't necessarily have to be that tall, but he should be attractive at least! :smileyvery-happy:

That last site is great Choisya - so much information. Thank you! I never realized that there were that many films & shows on Robin Hood.

Did you happen to watch the series on BBC One back in the fall? I'm looking forward to seeing the first episode on Saturday.



Choisya wrote:
Which myth do you prefer LizzieAnn?

http://www.icons.org.uk/theicons/collection/robin-hood/biography/early-british-mythology-finished

Here is a statue of Robin Hood outside Nottingham Castle. It was sculpted when I was a young married woman and caused much controversy because he is not tall and handsome. However, the sculptor said that he had based it on research into the height, clothing etc of men of that time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood

There is a list of books, films etc on this US university website devoted to Robin Hood:-

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/CAMELOT/rh/rhhome.stm






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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Robin Hood

[ Edited ]
LOL. The statue of Maid Marian, which stands opposite, does not show her as noble and beautiful either. (I can't find a photo.) They are both depicted as outlaws, not as nobility. The sculptor is debunking the myths. In these stories Richard I is also portrayed as a hero and that myth has now been debunked too. I think Everyman has mentioned somewhere that his brother King John, another Plantaganet maligned in our history, is now being reassessed by historians and in that reassessment Richard I, the Lionheart, does not come out well.




Everyman wrote:


LizzieAnn wrote:
That statue is against type for me. He doesn't necessarily have to be that tall, but he should be attractive at least!

Absolutely. Would the noble and beautiful Maid Marian gone gaga over a guy who looked like that?

Message Edited by Choisya on 02-27-200704:37 AM

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Choisya
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Re: Community Thread : Tea and the British Empire

LOL. Are there no depths to which you will not sink to denigrate the Brits Everyman.:smileyvery-happy: The sun didn't set on the Portuguese Empire because it was spread out in small territories all over the globe, whereas the British Empire covered more than 25 per cent of the globe:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_Empire

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Empire






Everyman wrote:
A good cup of tea is the most satisfactory accompaniment to a good book (a cat on the lap and, in winter, a fire are the other two critical accompaniments).

Just as we like knowing something about the authors we read, it can be fun to read something about the teas we drink. My tea company, Upton Tea, has articles on the tea trade in its quarterly newsletters/catalogs, and the most recent was particularly interesting, being the history of the opening of the sea route to India.

An interesting aside is that Britain was not the first nation to have an empire on which the sun never set. Portugal beat them to it. Take that, you English!

These articles are as much a delight to read as their tea is to drink. You can read their articles on their web site. Go to
http://www.uptontea.com
The current installment should show up on the home page: go to Read the Spring 2007 Article. Or if for some reason you wind up at a different place, click on the Information tab at the top and then the Current Newsletter Homepage. This is the third article in a series on the history of tea; their catalog essays (almost all of which are worth reading) are chronological, so look on the bottom for the most recent entries.

And while you're there, order a bit of tea. Personally, I find the best way to enjoy loose tea is to make it a mug at a time using a mug strainer (under Accessories/Infusers) since it gives the loose tea the greatest room to bloom while still making it easy to remove the tea leaves from the cup, and makes sure that each cup is as fresh as possible.


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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Community Thread

India, Ceylon or China come to mind when I buy or drink tea.:smileyvery-happy:




LizzieAnn wrote:
Thanks for the site - it was interesting to read. Portugal isn't what comes to mind when I think of tea. Now, I know that I've been missing something. :smileyhappy:


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LizzieAnn
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Community Thread

Me too! I love the whole tea thing - making it, straining it, and drinking it! :smileyvery-happy:



Choisya wrote:
India, Ceylon or China come to mind when I buy or drink tea.:smileyvery-happy:




LizzieAnn wrote:
Thanks for the site - it was interesting to read. Portugal isn't what comes to mind when I think of tea. Now, I know that I've been missing something. :smileyhappy:





Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Richard I

I don't know much about Richard I, but I vaguely recall reading somewhere that Richard spent less than a year in England once he was king while spending years in the Crusades and elsewhere. Doesn't really make for a great king - one who's long absent from his country.



Choisya wrote:
LOL. The statue of Maid Marian, which stands opposite, does not show her as noble and beautiful either. (I can't find a photo.) They are both depicted as outlaws, not as nobility. The sculptor is debunking the myths. In these stories Richard I is also portrayed as a hero and that myth has now been debunked too. I think Everyman has mentioned somewhere that his brother King John, another Plantaganet maligned in our history, is now being reassessed by historians and in that reassessment Richard I, the Lionheart, does not come out well.



Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Community Thread : Tea and the British Empire



Choisya wrote:
LOL. Are there no depths to which you will not sink to denigrate the Brits Everyman.


Just trying to set the record straight.

Just the facts, Ma'am. Just the facts.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
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Re: Richard I

Revisionist history is a wonderful thing.

Of course, then we have to revise the revisionists, then revise the revisers, then on and on until we come full circle and find out that the original history was pretty accurate after all.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Richard I

Yes that is one of the arguments against him LizzieAnn and that he squandered the fortunes of England fighting Crusades, that he was weak, vainglorious, a sadist and a homosexual (not that the latter should be held against him). Hardly the stuff of the warrior king of Robin Hood Legend. It is also another Catholic v. Protestant controversy and the Crusades were Catholic inspired but became less well regarded after the Reformation and the establishment of the Church of England.:smileysad:




LizzieAnn wrote:
I don't know much about Richard I, but I vaguely recall reading somewhere that Richard spent less than a year in England once he was king while spending years in the Crusades and elsewhere. Doesn't really make for a great king - one who's long absent from his country.



Choisya wrote:
LOL. The statue of Maid Marian, which stands opposite, does not show her as noble and beautiful either. (I can't find a photo.) They are both depicted as outlaws, not as nobility. The sculptor is debunking the myths. In these stories Richard I is also portrayed as a hero and that myth has now been debunked too. I think Everyman has mentioned somewhere that his brother King John, another Plantaganet maligned in our history, is now being reassessed by historians and in that reassessment Richard I, the Lionheart, does not come out well.








LizzieAnn wrote:
I don't know much about Richard I, but I vaguely recall reading somewhere that Richard spent less than a year in England once he was king while spending years in the Crusades and elsewhere. Doesn't really make for a great king - one who's long absent from his country.



Choisya wrote:
LOL. The statue of Maid Marian, which stands opposite, does not show her as noble and beautiful either. (I can't find a photo.) They are both depicted as outlaws, not as nobility. The sculptor is debunking the myths. In these stories Richard I is also portrayed as a hero and that myth has now been debunked too. I think Everyman has mentioned somewhere that his brother King John, another Plantaganet maligned in our history, is now being reassessed by historians and in that reassessment Richard I, the Lionheart, does not come out well.






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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Richard I

[ Edited ]
But your new interpretation of Richard III is revisionist!! And so will the one on King John be.




Everyman wrote:
Revisionist history is a wonderful thing.

Of course, then we have to revise the revisionists, then revise the revisers, then on and on until we come full circle and find out that the original history was pretty accurate after all.

Message Edited by Choisya on 02-27-200704:56 PM

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