Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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IlanaSimons
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Community Thread

Enter here to launch hello's and casual discussion.



Ilana
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Choisya
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Re: Community Thread

[ Edited ]

IlanaSimons wrote:
Enter here to launch hello's and casual discussion.




Hello again Ilana and fellow readers and thanks for trying to introduce some structure. I wonder though whether it might be best to move these more 'permanent' threads into the boxes at the top of the page?? Otherwise they will get lost in the melee:smileyhappy:

Oh and I'm Choisya, a 74 year old widow from Over the Pond who spends far too much time on these boards because I suffer from insomnia:smileyhappy: I live on a pension so nowadays try not to spend too much on books, which means that I tend to join the discussions on ones I already have in my 4000 book library:smileyhappy:

Message Edited by Choisya on 12-01-200602:17 PM

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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Thread

[ Edited ]
and Choisya...do you try your hand at fiction, yourself?

Message Edited by IlanaSimons on 12-01-200607:59 PM




Ilana
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willowy
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Re: Community Thread

Hello Everyone! I'm Willowy and I'm in a few of the other book clubs on here, I mainly lurk in the American Classics which I've been enjoying so far. I love British Lit and I'm sure I'll learn lots more here. I already see a few familiar names in here posting so I'm looking forward to all the interesting discussions we'll have!
-----------Willowy----------
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Thread

Hi Willowy
Thanks for joining. What do you like to get out of a book group?



Ilana
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willowy
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Re: Community Thread



IlanaSimons wrote:
Hi Willowy
Thanks for joining. What do you like to get out of a book group?



I just purely love the discussion of the books. To hear other people's views on something I've read and also you get so many good recommendations! I know my To Be Read List has grown with each discussion I join! But different people bring different things to the discussions and that's always enjoyable.
-----------Willowy----------
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Thread

Sounds good!
I hope you join our CRANFORD group that'll start after the weekend, under the Woman Writer thread. You can read just the first 2 chapters of that book and have plenty to say.....



Ilana
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donyskiw
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Re: Community Thread

I'm Denise and I live in Colorado. I'm still getting used to the new format (mostly trying to not get involved in more discussion than I can handle!). I read Jane Eyre the first time it was offered as a BNU selection and hope we will discuss it here.

Denise
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Thread

In terms of Jane Eyre, we probably don't even need to wait for a formal group-wide re-read. That's one book that's lodged in so many of our heads. I can post some starter discussion questions if people would like that discussion....
Like:
Jane Eyre's remained so central in popular culture because this heroine is both real and uncommonly resilient.
What qualities does Jane possess that you admire?
Which qualities seem less than admirable?



Ilana
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donyskiw
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Re: Community Thread

Jane had a strong sense of herself. She wasn't going to just give in to any situation that came along. I seem to remember being irritated that she kept calling her lover (whose name I can't remember right now) "sir".

Denise
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Thread



donyskiw wrote:
Jane had a strong sense of herself. She wasn't going to just give in to any situation that came along. I seem to remember being irritated that she kept calling her lover (whose name I can't remember right now) "sir".

Denise




Rochester. Yes. Jane Eyre had that realistic worldview that you also saw in Jane Austen: She wanted to act outside social convention, but was highly aware of the cost of doing it.



Ilana
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donyskiw
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Re: Community Thread

Now I remember, Rochester.

That's it. When it comes right down to it, most of us are not really able to totally step out of the roles society sets up for us. I've always been a maverick but I still have to pick and choose exactly how I want to manifest my maverick nature. In today's society, there's a fine line between "unique" and "weird". In Regency and Victorian England, straying from the rules was even less tolerated.

Denise
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jwalt
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Re: Community Thread

Hi all,

My name is Jess, and I am a college student in New York. Not having much time to read during the school year, I was looking for something to read over winter break and saw this thread. Are you still going to be doing North & South? Sorry if this is in the wrong thread, I'm still trying to figure out the new layout.

Jess
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For Jess: NORTH AND SOUTH

Yes, Jess, we plan to read it in January: perhaps you can follow the discussion to the end anyway! To go to the message below, click on this link.


pmath wrote:
Ladies, since there is no British classic scheduled for discussion in January, and you're all interested in reading Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South after Christmas, I'll start a discussion next month, as Ilana suggests below. As I noted in an earlier message, there is currently no B&N Classics edition available, so we probably can't discuss it on a separate board in the near future anyway!

I have the Penguin Classics edition, and I hope someone plans to purchase the new Norton Critical Edition. There are 52 chapters, so perhaps we should discuss 13 chapters per week over four weeks, and compare it to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice afterward.

IlanaSimons wrote:
Feel free to be renegades in the generalized sections: Launch any book discussions you want, with or without the structure a moderator lends.


jwalt wrote:
Not having much time to read during the school year, I was looking for something to read over winter break and saw this thread. Are you still going to be doing North & South?
Melissa_W
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Re: Community Thread

Ack! I miss being on the boards for approximately one week and look what you all are doing. I am jealous - JEALOUS, do you hear? :smileytongue: - since I've been putting in overtime at work and I have a ginormous term paper due for my Restoration lit class (a little Margaret Cavendish anyone?) which leaves me NO time for fun *scowl*. Sigh. I will be lurking about in the shadows.
Melissa W.
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jwalt
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Re: For Jess: NORTH AND SOUTH

Awesome! Thanks!
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Community Thread



pedsphleb wrote:
Ack! I miss being on the boards for approximately one week and look what you all are doing. I am jealous - JEALOUS, do you hear? :smileytongue: - since I've been putting in overtime at work and I have a ginormous term paper due for my Restoration lit class (a little Margaret Cavendish anyone?) which leaves me NO time for fun *scowl*. Sigh. I will be lurking about in the shadows.


Tell us what the paper's on, Melissa. Speak Restoration to us....



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Melissa_W
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Re: Community Thread

I am attempting ("attempting" being the operative term) to examine Cavendish's stab at "sovreignty" in her work The Blazing World, starting with Katherine Gallagher's article "Embracing the Absolute: The Politics of the Female Subject in Seventeenth-Century England." I'm also going to contrast Cavendish with Christine de Pisan (The City of Ladies) and Mary Wollstonecraft (Vindication of the Rights of Women). Cavendish belived that a woman was sovreign unto herself (in her writing, she desired a "kingdom" of her own so much she wrote TBW) because women could not vote, own property, or take the Oath of Supremacy, and therefore were not subjects of the Crown. I think there are little hints of this idea in the de Pisan and the Wollstonecraft. I have lots of reading/writing yet to do for this.

And by the way, TBW is pretty crazy and reminded me very much of Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy, which is itself greatly indebted to John Milton's Paradise Lost. I can't find anywhere where Pullman read Cavendish (he may, in fact, have since he grew up in Wales and was educated at Oxford, I believe).

If we're talking Restoration, the drama is somewhat better and the poetry we read by John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, was much more entertaining. :smileytongue:



IlanaSimons wrote:


pedsphleb wrote:
Ack! I miss being on the boards for approximately one week and look what you all are doing. I am jealous - JEALOUS, do you hear? :smileytongue: - since I've been putting in overtime at work and I have a ginormous term paper due for my Restoration lit class (a little Margaret Cavendish anyone?) which leaves me NO time for fun *scowl*. Sigh. I will be lurking about in the shadows.


Tell us what the paper's on, Melissa. Speak Restoration to us....


Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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Laurel
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Margaret Cavendish

Amazing, Babyvamp! I had to look her up, which shows how much my little female mind is expanding these days.



pedsphleb wrote:
I am attempting ("attempting" being the operative term) to examine Cavendish's stab at "sovreignty" in her work The Blazing World, starting with Katherine Gallagher's article "Embracing the Absolute: The Politics of the Female Subject in Seventeenth-Century England." I'm also going to contrast Cavendish with Christine de Pisan (The City of Ladies) and Mary Wollstonecraft (Vindication of the Rights of Women). Cavendish belived that a woman was sovreign unto herself (in her writing, she desired a "kingdom" of her own so much she wrote TBW) because women could not vote, own property, or take the Oath of Supremacy, and therefore were not subjects of the Crown. I think there are little hints of this idea in the de Pisan and the Wollstonecraft. I have lots of reading/writing yet to do for this.

And by the way, TBW is pretty crazy and reminded me very much of Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy, which is itself greatly indebted to John Milton's Paradise Lost. I can't find anywhere where Pullman read Cavendish (he may, in fact, have since he grew up in Wales and was educated at Oxford, I believe).

If we're talking Restoration, the drama is somewhat better and the poetry we read by John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, was much more entertaining. :smileytongue:



IlanaSimons wrote:


pedsphleb wrote:
Ack! I miss being on the boards for approximately one week and look what you all are doing. I am jealous - JEALOUS, do you hear? :smileytongue: - since I've been putting in overtime at work and I have a ginormous term paper due for my Restoration lit class (a little Margaret Cavendish anyone?) which leaves me NO time for fun *scowl*. Sigh. I will be lurking about in the shadows.


Tell us what the paper's on, Melissa. Speak Restoration to us....





"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: Stephen Hawkings discussion

I must say that Steve Fentress really has got a hold of using these boards for a structured discussion. Although the Stephen Hawkings book is way over my head, I can appreciate the way Steve has structured it has kept participants on board and is illustrative of what can be done within the new format.
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