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Laurel
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Re: Question for Ilana

I think this story is a good idea for us to do, Ilana. I was listening to a discussion of it yesterday on a Russian literature course I am auditing and thinking, "Oh, I'd really like to read that!" I was also wondering whether it's been compared to Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer," which I haven't read since high-school days.



IlanaSimons wrote:


Laurel wrote:
"My March book group is Dostoevsky's The Double."

Ilana, will that be instead of Notes from the Underground, or in addition to? Constance Garnett translation?

Message Edited by Laurel on 02-16-200704:10 PM







Yes: it is the Garnett. I will focus on The Double. The B&N classic Dostoevsky short fiction book, titled, Notes from the Underground, The Double and Other Stories has about 4 more stories in it. Perhaps we can hit them all, tho The Double is about 170 pgs and Notes from Underground is about 160 pgs. So all I can say for sure is that I'll be focusing on The Double. It's a really wild tale: ripe for multiple interpretations. A guy meets his double. This could be a metaphor for reputation-control, or paranoia, or the Freudian split self, or lots of things. It's just a meaningful read, and less word-claustrophobic than Notes From Undergound.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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IlanaSimons
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Re: Question for Ilana



Laurel wrote:
I think this story is a good idea for us to do, Ilana. I was listening to a discussion of it yesterday on a Russian literature course I am auditing and thinking, "Oh, I'd really like to read that!" I was also wondering whether it's been compared to Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer," which I haven't read since high-school days.





I'm so glad you've already heard some interpretations of the story and hope you'll join in the discussion.
I actually haven't read "The Secret Sharer" yet(!) though the story even strikes some parallels to Conrad's "Heart of Darkness." In both, we've got a guy whose anxiety forces him to consider his similarities and difference to someone else.
We have a lonely narrator who worries about how he matches up with another, more powerful figure. And they're both really short gems.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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Laurel
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Re: Question for Ilana



IlanaSimons wrote:


Laurel wrote:
I think this story is a good idea for us to do, Ilana. I was listening to a discussion of it yesterday on a Russian literature course I am auditing and thinking, "Oh, I'd really like to read that!" I was also wondering whether it's been compared to Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Sharer," which I haven't read since high-school days.





I'm so glad you've already heard some interpretations of the story and hope you'll join in the discussion.
I actually haven't read "The Secret Sharer" yet(!) though the story even strikes some parallels to Conrad's "Heart of Darkness." In both, we've got a guy whose anxiety forces him to consider his similarities and difference to someone else.
We have a lonely narrator who worries about how he matches up with another, more powerful figure. And they're both really short gems.





I'll definitely be there, Ilana! I'm rereading The Brothers Karamazov right now and will be ready for more. Conrad fascinates me, too. Maybe we could do him sometime? It's amazing that he didn't speak English until he was a young man.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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PaulK
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Re: Jane Austen's wit

This thread seems like a good place to mention the vocabulary used by JA. I think that if young student knew every word in P&P they would have little trouble with their SAT. Within a few pages I noted: servility, obsequiousness and condescension. Two of her favorite words seem to be affable and amiable. Reading JA is like eating fine chocolate; you want the words to slowly melt in your mouth. I just love it when she has heated dialogue and instead of throwing out cuss words and raising their voice they let fly some of the most beautiful language I have read.
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kiakar
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Re: For Choisya: Gentility (and Q for Ilana re Jane Austen's MANSFIELD PARK)



Everyman wrote:
Ilana, since the discussion of Paradise Lost will probably be relatively lengthy, is it okay with you if we discuss Mansfield Park here concurrently?

Choisya and others have already noted the problem of too many book discussions going on at once diluting the audience, and therefore the quality of discussion, of each of them. Up to now, we have followed a clear pattern of one reader-moderated discussion at a time, and that has seemed to work well for us.

Ilana, I think it would be a mistake for you to approve scheduling two or more reader-moderated book at once on top of the "official" scheduled book discussions. Given the limited time people have to spend here, it would be inevitable that all the discussions would be likely to suffer.





Ilana; I hope sometime in the future there will be another Jane Austin book on the British Classic book club. I love Jane Austin so very much and so enjoy all her books. I relish discussing them with others. A whole new respective is gained by reading these books with others.And Lizzie did such a awesome job moderating P & P for us. Thanks to both of you.
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For kiakar: Plans for Discussing Jane Austen's MANSFIELD PARK

I'm very glad to hear this, kiakar, since we are indeed planning to discuss Mansfield Park in just a few months! BTW, I'm enjoying your posts very much indeed.


kiakar wrote:
Ilana; I hope sometime in the future there will be another Jane Austin book on the British Classic book club.
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Jane Austen's wit

Good post Paul! Jane's words and dialog compare to chocolate! How apropos, at least to me. There are many passages just worth savoring.



PaulK wrote:
This thread seems like a good place to mention the vocabulary used by JA. I think that if young student knew every word in P&P they would have little trouble with their SAT. Within a few pages I noted: servility, obsequiousness and condescension. Two of her favorite words seem to be affable and amiable. Reading JA is like eating fine chocolate; you want the words to slowly melt in your mouth. I just love it when she has heated dialogue and instead of throwing out cuss words and raising their voice they let fly some of the most beautiful language I have read.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Laurel
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Re: Jane Austen's wit



PaulK wrote:
This thread seems like a good place to mention the vocabulary used by JA. I think that if young student knew every word in P&P they would have little trouble with their SAT. Within a few pages I noted: servility, obsequiousness and condescension. Two of her favorite words seem to be affable and amiable. Reading JA is like eating fine chocolate; you want the words to slowly melt in your mouth. I just love it when she has heated dialogue and instead of throwing out cuss words and raising their voice they let fly some of the most beautiful language I have read.




Well put, Paul!
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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LizzieAnn
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kiakar

Thank you kiakar. I too eagerly anticipate more Jane Austen discussions, and I know that pmath's moderation of Mansfield Park will be fun and informative. She did an excellent job with North & South. After that, we still have 4 more of Jane Austen's major novels that can be discussed, and hopefully we'll get them all in at one time or another.



kiakar wrote:

Ilana; I hope sometime in the future there will be another Jane Austin book on the British Classic book club. I love Jane Austin so very much and so enjoy all her books. I relish discussing them with others. A whole new respective is gained by reading these books with others.And Lizzie did such a awesome job moderating P & P for us. Thanks to both of you.

Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Everyman
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Re: kiakar



LizzieAnn wrote:
I know that pmath's moderation of Mansfield Park will be fun and informative. After that, we still have 4 more of Jane Austen's major novels that can be discussed, and hopefully we'll get them all in at one time or another.

while we're on an Austen roll, let's just take them all in sequence right after Mansfield Park. You and pmath can alternate moderating them.
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For Liz: Discussing JA's novels

Well, Liz, my approach is ad hoc, whereas you come well-prepared, but I love MP almost as much as I love P&P, so I'm really looking forward to our disucssion! I'm very glad to hear you'll be participating, too, and it certainly would be great to also discuss the two other novels not covered at BNU, Sense and Sensibility and Northanger Abbey, sometime.


LizzieAnn wrote:
I too eagerly anticipate more Jane Austen discussions, and I know that pmath's moderation of Mansfield Park will be fun and informative. She did an excellent job with North & South. After that, we still have 4 more of Jane Austen's major novels that can be discussed, and hopefully we'll get them all in at one time or another.
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LizzieAnn
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Pmath - Discussing JA's novels

The only B&N discussion that I participated in was Emma, but I would also very much like to do Persuasion. It's also one of my favorites. We'll have to be sure to get in all four! I've never read her other works, Juvenilia, Catherine, Sandition, History of England, or Lady Susan, but I am planning to at some point.

Your ad hoc approach has been wonderful - contributing a lot of information in addition to your usual brilliant posts!



pmath wrote:
Well, Liz, my approach is ad hoc, whereas you come well-prepared, but I love MP almost as much as I love P&P, so I'm really looking forward to our disucssion! I'm very glad to hear you'll be participating, too, and it certainly would be great to also discuss the two other novels not covered at BNU, Sense and Sensibility and Northanger Abbey, sometime.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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