Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
historybuff234
Posts: 536
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
0 Kudos

Joseph Conrad

I am thinking about sometime reading the things that Joseph Conrad wrote like Lord Jim, Nostromo, Heart of Darkness,and The Secret Agent. Which would be good one to read first? I was thinking Lord Jim or Nostromo would be good.
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad



historybuff234 wrote:
I am thinking about sometime reading the things that Joseph Conrad wrote like Lord Jim, Nostromo, Heart of Darkness,and The Secret Agent. Which would be good one to read first? I was thinking Lord Jim or Nostromo would be good.




Heart of Darkness is such a powerful (and short) story.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Frequent Contributor
historybuff234
Posts: 536
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad

Thanks, for answering my question, how is Lord Jim and Nostromo?

You are only limited by the boundries of your imagination and the laws in you area- Red Green
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad



historybuff234 wrote:
Thanks, for answering my question, how is Lord Jim and Nostromo?

You are only limited by the boundries of your imagination and the laws in you area- Red Green




Once you read one book by Joseph Conrad you'll want to read them all, Buff. They are all wonderful.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Correspondent
willowy
Posts: 148
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad


IlanaSimons wrote:


historybuff234 wrote:
I am thinking about sometime reading the things that Joseph Conrad wrote like Lord Jim, Nostromo, Heart of Darkness,and The Secret Agent. Which would be good one to read first? I was thinking Lord Jim or Nostromo would be good.




Heart of Darkness is such a powerful (and short) story.



I agree, it is a very powerful story and because of it's size you can read it in a few sittings and I think it is a good intro to his work.
-----------Willowy----------
New User
AmyLiz
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-03-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad

I've only read Lord Jim, and I was very pleasantly surprised by it. I had to read it for a class and thought I'd be bored out of my mind, but I couldn't put it down.
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness

I would be up for "Heart of Darkness"

Chad
Frequent Contributor
thinker
Posts: 129
Registered: ‎08-17-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad

Nostromo is quite good, but I think Heart of Darkness is better for a start
Thinker
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad and Rivers

[ Edited ]
Hello everyone!
 
This might be a good follow up to Gasby, although the story was written prior to 1920. Conrad hails from Poland which, and as mentioned in Gatsby, occasionally loses it's borders, only to form again and reshape, if only in treaties. The new shape seems once again to produce new lines. But the lines that form Poland are also rivers, and, its as if the rivers seem to give the country not only its borders, but also its color, so to speak. Perhaps the heart of a country sometimes lies on its borders, and not within them.
 
Chad   


Message Edited by chad on 02-27-2008 12:54 PM
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Inside/out convolutions

Whew! And I thought the American 1920's was a little scary! How abouy the Age of Imperialism? That my inside is my outside is a little confusing. The navigable rivers of the world ultimately led to its civilizations that lie somewhere within. Conrad, as Marlow, talks a little about how our rivers formed our history and ourselves, and yet, many, tragically wind up as borders, literally splitting ourselves, into two parts if you will. Fighting that takes place along the river is ineffectual, it's as if we're just fighting ourselves.
 
Chad 
Contributor
rdm68
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad

I would recommend starting with The Secret Agent. It may not be Conrad's most typical book, but it's a riveting read, and unforgettable. Personally, I found Nostromo a little tedious.
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Nemo

[ Edited ]
Thanks!
 
I usually read just one book by a famous author and thn I move on to the next one.  I wondered if he was influenced by Jules Verne. Conrad talks about the "luminous" sea, and it seems to be a novel about the tension between light and dark, or the known and unknown, represented by Arronax and Nemo, respectively, in "Leagues." In "the Heart", the sea and sky are now "welded" together by business and commerce.  All of the world now lies on a map, and men, driven by profit and efficiency, are expendable- fate is controlled, and the world feels "lifeless."   The unknown and relatively unexplored regions of the world, like the Congo, are now, ironically, a source of light and life for the world.
 
Chad


Message Edited by chad on 03-01-2008 12:20 PM
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

20,000 leagues

[ Edited ]
Maybe we can start a 20,000 thread. The famous line that I like, found in "Pro and Con":
 
"Thus may this inexplicable phenomenon be explained, unless there be something over and above all that one has ever conjectured, seen, perceived, or experienced; which is just within the bounds of possibility."
 
Sometimes translated differently. I think the "bound" is that line between the "unreal" and the "unknown", but we can sometimes be within that line. Or, we could, as Conrad mentions, be inside the planet Mars.  
 
Chad


Message Edited by chad on 03-02-2008 01:47 PM
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

That my inside is my outside...more thoughts

[ Edited ]
The obvious example is our love for the outdoors. People seek tranquility or attempt to find an "inner peace" by hiking, camping, etc in the great outdoors. So, I seek something inside myself, in the outdoors- my inside is my outside, and vice versa. 
 
Chad   
 
PS- I also wander through malls and I come across high tech gadgets that have the sounds of Nature in convenient high tech speakers- the outside is something we also need to have inside our homes for tranquility and sleep- something Stoker probably felt we were losing right around the turn of the century- for "Dracula" fans.


Message Edited by chad on 03-03-2008 12:45 PM
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: That my inside is my outside...more thoughts, embryology inquiries

[ Edited ]
My outside also becomes my inside in embryonic development, specifically when the blastula becomes the gastrula during the process of induction- it's a natural process, as well as a result of civilization (i.e. my inner peace can be found in the wild or the outdoors.)
 
Chad
 
PS- Malls are a modern mix of inside, outside, streams and water or fountains and trade, etc. etc.


Message Edited by chad on 03-04-2008 02:03 PM
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

the River Thames

[ Edited ]
I have to admit, I did not want to hear a story from Marlow for some reason, but I like the story thus far... it also has some humor. The story begins on the Thames and the river, as mentioned, has a long history, although spanning a relatively short length, for rivers that is. It looks like the river fluxes between "the heart" and the border. The river runs through the city of London, but a river is wild or uncontrolled, at least, attempts to control the course of rivers are often met with futility. But, in continuation of my inside/outside motif, I wonder if there will always be a part of civilization that is wild. As mentioned, we seek inner peace in the outdoors, and the river is sometimes that line between civilization and Nature, calling us to cross and "take the to sea." Our wilderness lies somewhere beyond our city's rivers.
 
Chad
 




Message Edited by chad on 03-05-2008 05:19 PM
Frequent Contributor
historybuff234
Posts: 536
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness

Hey Everybody! I have so far read two Conrad works: Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim. So far I'd have to say Heart of Darkness I like a little more than Lord Jim. But Lord Jim was good. Although, I must admit, the narration made parts of it a little hard to understand. Nonetheless, it was a great work.
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Joseph Conrad: Heart of Darkness

[ Edited ]
I haven't read Lord Jim, but I hope to. I just read some info on flooding and the Thames- one of the greater floods took place recently- it would have caused a lot of damage had there not been "floodgates." It is a  great example of wild river, somewhat tamed by London. It also looks like a snake, as Conrad describes the Congo river. I was wondering about the possibility of diverting and/or completely draining the river- that could mean a Netherlands type of existence, but wondering about the possibilty. It's obviously important for trade, but this is the era of multimodal-transport....
 
Chad 
 
 


Message Edited by chad on 03-06-2008 05:52 PM
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Mica

"The mica group represents 34 phyllosilicate minerals that have a layered or platy texture.  The commercially important micas are muscovite and phlogopite.  Layering in the univalent (potassium, sodium), or true, micas imparts perfect basal cleavage, allowing crystals to be split into very thin sheets that are tough and flexible.  Layering in the divalent, or brittle, micas also results in perfect basal cleavage; the greater bond strengths, however, make them more brittle and less flexible.  Mica sheets are also transparent to opaque, resilient, reflective, refractive, dielectric, chemically inert, insulating, lightweight, and hydrophilic.  Mica also is stable when exposed to electricity, light, moisture, and extreme temperatures."
 
This was interesting description of Mica  from USGS and perhaps describes the characteristics of a "line" in general. Certainly, in our story, mica was the line between Civilization and Nature, or between the UK and the Congo, if you will. But the finest layer of mica might be what a "true" line would be.
 
Chad 
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Black and white

Conrad presents sharp contrasts between the colors, black and white. We often describe people who view things in this way as straightforward, honest, but not always intelligent. When we place ourselves on either  side of a line, we can be unintelligent. That is, we can be unintelligent of we don't see perhaps different gradations of both colors, or, how the lines of one color become stronger in the other. So, for example, If I move with a light bulb from a state of darkness to the sun, the lines created by light bulb become weaker. The reverse is true. In the "Heart", the creations of civilization, like a book or the cover a book, become almost "glowing" in the jungle. Other colors only seem to create or obscure the lines,  possibly deceiving us, like a harlequin.
 
Chad 
Top Kudoed Authors
User Kudos Count
1
1
Users Online
Currently online: 53 members 658 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: