Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: For Laurel: E. F. Benson, etc.

[ Edited ]
Benson was a great friend of Henry James who lived in Rye, where many of Benson's stories are set. He bought Henry James' 'Lamb House', which is now a very nice museum. Do you think his stories show any signs of being influenced by James, who was a 'grand old man' of American literature at the time they met?

http://www.touruk.co.uk/houses/houseesuss_lamb.htm

A better picture:-

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-lambhouse/

Message Edited by Choisya on 01-20-200701:26 PM

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Lamb House: Henry James and Ford Madox Ford

Thanks for this link, Choisya: I see that HJ entertained FMF.


Choisya wrote:

http://www.touruk.co.uk/houses/houseesuss_lamb.htm
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Lamb House: Henry James and Ford Madox Ford

Henry James seemed to be very popular over here pmath - many authors and artists supped with him. What a time that must have been and how we would all have like to be been flies on the wall:smileyvery-happy:




pmath wrote:
Thanks for this link, Choisya: I see that HJ entertained FMF.


Choisya wrote:

http://www.touruk.co.uk/houses/houseesuss_lamb.htm



Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Elizabeth Gaskell's Industrial Novels

I think Ziki is a fan now, too! Perhaps EG's industrial novels are not as well-known outside of England because some knowledge of the historical background is necessary to fully appreciate them.


ziki wrote (here):
hey Philo,
the paragraph you quoted would make me want to read the whole book!

Choisya wrote:
I am pleased to hear this Lauren because Gaskell rates alongside the other 'greats' over here and has been in print and on school and college reading lists since she was published. She is perhaps less known in the US because of her rather 'leftist' views on labour relations, as her writing about the Preston strike shows in N&S and her even more radical views in Mary Barton.

Laurel wrote:
I, for one, am glad to have found her, and I expect to be reading more of her works in the future.

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Elizabeth Gaskell's Industrial Novels



pmath wrote:
I think Ziki is a fan now, too! Perhaps EG's industrial novels are not as well-known outside of England because some knowledge of the historical background is necessary to fully appreciate them.


Possibly, but Americans seem very keen on Dickens and quite a lot of historical knowledge is needed there too, although that is knowledge of London. And as you see from Alan Shelston's lecture, she is very popular in Japan and ranked in popularity with Dickens in her time.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Single-Author Study

I love to get stuck into one author too pmath and have often read through entire authors before moving onto the next. It is particularly gratifying with historical novels because you can immerse yourself in the period. I remember doing this at school with Galsworthy's Forsyte Saga.





pmath wrote:
I actually find it very instructive to read all the major works of an author in quick succession (as college/graduate students do for seminars, for example).
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

David Ball's BACKWARDS & FORWARDS

Yes, and each individual piece gives you insight into all the others! My favorite book on literary analysis is David Ball's Backwards & Forwards: A Technical Manual for Reading Plays, in which DB recommends reading other works by the author of the piece you're studying, too. In fact, his technique, reflected in the title of his book, could also be applied to entire author canons, not just a particular piece!

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780809311101

Choisya wrote:
I love to get stuck into one author too pmath and have often read through entire authors before moving onto the next. It is particularly gratifying with historical novels because you can immerse yourself in the period. I remember doing this at school with Galsworthy's Forsyte Saga.

pmath wrote:
I actually find it very instructive to read all the major works of an author in quick succession (as college/graduate students do for seminars, for example).

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: David Ball's BACKWARDS & FORWARDS



pmath wrote:
Yes, and each individual piece gives you insight into all the others!


We'll see how committed you are to this principle when we read Ivanhoe and see whether you then press for reading all of Scott's output. I don't have his complete works, but I do have thirteen of his novels, of which I only remember reading nine or ten.

Hardy is another instance where one may not want to read all of his output before moving on to other authors -- in his case I have an almost complete set of his works in 23 volumes, of which, in his case, I have read all at least once and a number more than once, but certainly not in a single sequence.

Or Trollope -- my library of Trollope is quite incomplete, I have only 36 of his works (plus his autobiography), all of which I have read at least once, but there are still a number of his books which I don't yet own. Should we eschew reading any of him unless we are prepared to read much of him sequentially?

It's a nice theory, and as David Ball, whose book I have also enjoyed, points out, it's quite possible when reading a playwright to read several works in fairly rapid sequence, since most plays can be read in an hour or two, but it's a different matter, I think, with novelists.

But heck, if people here want to keep on reading Gaskell for the next few months instead of moving on, be my guests. And, of course, those who are retired or have limited family or other outside obligations and therefore much more time for reading may be able to do it all. I, for one, will look forward to our discussion of Austen, Hemingway, Dostoevsky, et. al.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Plays and Film Adaptations of Novels

True, but plays are denser, and a good one calls for multiple readings, which can take as much time as reading a novel. It's interesting to see how scriptwriters condense novels for film adaptations: good ones, in turn, call for multiple viewings. I think adaptations of Jane Austen's novels are particularly interesting, since her novels are already tight to begin with.


Everyman wrote:
It's a nice theory, and as David Ball, whose book I have also enjoyed, points out, it's quite possible when reading a playwright to read several works in fairly rapid sequence, since most plays can be read in an hour or two, but it's a different matter, I think, with novelists.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

For Ilana: Discussion of UTOPIA

Why don't we discuss Utopia, as Choisya suggested (back in December), in March/April?

Is this okay with you, Ilana? Here's a link to our earlier discussion:

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/bn/board/message?board.id=BritishClassics&message.id=448


Laurel wrote:
It seems that the momentum is for Pride and Prejudice first. That sounds good to me, and Feb. 12 would be a good start date. ...

As for after Austen, we probably still have some discussing to do before we come to a decision.

Choisya wrote:
So what has been decided after all these suggestions?
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
0 Kudos

Re: For Ilana: Discussion of UTOPIA



pmath wrote:
Why don't we discuss Utopia, as Choisya suggested (back in December), in March/April?

Is this okay with you, Ilana? Here's a link to our earlier discussion:

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/bn/board/message?board.id=BritishClassics&message.id=448


Laurel wrote:
It seems that the momentum is for Pride and Prejudice first. That sounds good to me, and Feb. 12 would be a good start date. ...

As for after Austen, we probably still have some discussing to do before we come to a decision.

Choisya wrote:
So what has been decided after all these suggestions?





Do you mean doing Utpoia after Pride and Prejudice? That sounds great. I do hope the Pride and Prejudice discussion happens....



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

For Ilana: Discussion of P&P and UTOPIA

[ Edited ]
Thanks, Ilana! Yes, Liz is leading our discussion of P&P from February 12 through March 13. Since it's a relatively short book, we could discuss Utopia for two weeks, from March 19 through April 1.


IlanaSimons wrote:
Do you mean doing Utopia after Pride and Prejudice? That sounds great. I do hope the Pride and Prejudice discussion happens....

pmath wrote:
Why don't we discuss Utopia, as Choisya suggested (back in December), in March/April?

Is this okay with you, Ilana? Here's a link to our earlier discussion:

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/bn/board/message?board.id=BritishClassics&message.id=448

Message Edited by pmath on 01-26-200710:15 AM

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: For Ilana: Discussion of UTOPIA



pmath wrote:
Why don't we discuss Utopia, as Choisya suggested (back in December), in March/April?

Is this okay with you, Ilana?



Utopia doesn't interest me much, frankly. I haven't read it for quite a while, but from my recollection it's not particularly great writing, is relatively weak on philosophy, and would probably just generate a lot of political controversy (or else what would a discussion focus on?)

And of course I'm prejudiced against More because of the hatchet job he did on Richard III. He's not an honest writer.

If one were to read Utopia, the most interesting way would be to read it as part of a course on the variety of utopian writings, including for instance 1984, Brave New World, Walden Two, Peaceable Kingdoms, et. al. But that would be more than I think people are willing to tackle here.

There were a number of people who expressed interest in reading and discussing Paradise Lost in the spring, and it's certainly a foundational text of the English literary tradition, so would be well worth our time, besides being a significant change from Gaskell and Austen.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: For Ilana: Discussion of UTOPIA

I don't care either way pmath - Paradise Lost would be OK but probably just as controversial as it was full of 17th century religious satire and polemic. It might be a good idea, as Everyman suggests, to read Utopia alongside another utopian classic like Brave New World, if people think they could tackle discussing two books at once? (What the heck - we've just done Moby Dick!:smileyhappy:)

Looking at it in a broader perspective though - we still do not have many readers to go around here and I think it might be better at this stage of the new Clubs to keep to one of the more popular British Classics. That might draw more people in - what does Ilana think?




Everyman wrote:


pmath wrote:
Why don't we discuss Utopia, as Choisya suggested (back in December), in March/April?

Is this okay with you, Ilana?



Utopia doesn't interest me much, frankly. I haven't read it for quite a while, but from my recollection it's not particularly great writing, is relatively weak on philosophy, and would probably just generate a lot of political controversy (or else what would a discussion focus on?)

And of course I'm prejudiced against More because of the hatchet job he did on Richard III. He's not an honest writer.

If one were to read Utopia, the most interesting way would be to read it as part of a course on the variety of utopian writings, including for instance 1984, Brave New World, Walden Two, Peaceable Kingdoms, et. al. But that would be more than I think people are willing to tackle here.

There were a number of people who expressed interest in reading and discussing Paradise Lost in the spring, and it's certainly a foundational text of the English literary tradition, so would be well worth our time, besides being a significant change from Gaskell and Austen.


Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
0 Kudos

Re: For Ilana: Discussion of UTOPIA



Choisya wrote:
I don't care either way pmath - Paradise Lost would be OK but probably just as controversial as it was full of 17th century religious satire and polemic. It might be a good idea, as Everyman suggests, to read Utopia alongside another utopian classic like Brave New World, if people think they could tackle discussing two books at once? (What the heck - we've just done Moby Dick!:smileyhappy:)

Looking at it in a broader perspective though - we still do not have many readers to go around here and I think it might be better at this stage of the new Clubs to keep to one of the more popular British Classics. That might draw more people in - what does Ilana think?



Ilana thinks Utopia's a neat idea. It's short and doable (on the lame side of the "why"s)--and More's had a tremendous influence on British literary history.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Ilana: Your oil paintings!

[ Edited ]
I have just found your website - did you really paint those portraits of authors? And have you done any of the authors we have discussed on these boards - Gaskell, Hawthorne, Melville, Kafka???

http://homepage.newschool.edu/~ilana/

Message Edited by Choisya on 01-26-200705:01 AM

Frequent Contributor
ELee
Posts: 418
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Ilana: Your oil paintings!

Ilana - WOW! I'm impressed. I love your portraits!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

For Everyman: Discussion of PARADISE LOST

Were you thinking of a 6-/12-week discussion, from April through May/June?


Everyman wrote (here):
I would love to see it discussed slowly, with the care it deserves, perhaps one book per week (there are 12 books), but if that's too slow we could do one book every three or four days, allowing six weeks or so.

Everyman wrote:
There were a number of people who expressed interest in reading and discussing Paradise Lost in the spring, and it's certainly a foundational text of the English literary tradition, so would be well worth our time, besides being a significant change from Gaskell and Austen.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 1,101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Plans for March 2007 Discussion of UTOPIA and SparkNotes Links

[ Edited ]
I'll start a thread in the middle of March. Here are some links, in case anyone would like to start reading in advance:

Text:
http://pd.sparknotes.com/philosophy/utopia/

Study Guide:
http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/utopia/

Thomas More:
http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/more/



IlanaSimons wrote (here):
It's short and doable (on the lame side of the "why"s)--and More's had a tremendous influence on British literary history.

pmath wrote:
Since it's a relatively short book, we could discuss Utopia for two weeks, from March 19 through April 1.

IlanaSimons wrote:
That sounds great.

pmath wrote:
Why don't we discuss Utopia, as Choisya suggested (back in December), in March/April?


Message Edited by pmath on 01-26-200709:10 AM

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Milton, Paradise Lost

Maybe that would be a possibility...
a book good to read together with others, I suppose.
ziki
Top Kudoed Authors
User Kudos Count
1
1
Users Online
Currently online: 53 members 253 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: