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donyskiw
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Re: For Ilana: Humor in THE GOOD SOLDIER

I haven't read it but the book store called and said my copy is in.

Denise
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donyskiw
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Re: For Liz: Plans

Ooh, count me in! I already read it so I can jump right in! I think I already told you all how I was reading it on the dirty camping trip I took with my (now ex-) boyfriend who is the antithesis of Mr. Darcy!

Denise
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Ending of W&D

[ Edited ]
Did you read the Cornhill Magazine editor's concluding remarks? You can find them on the Web.


phlebslee wrote:
Loved W&D, would love to hear what others thought of her great unfinished work. I think the allure of this book is that it is unfinished. It leaves the reader to their own imagination of what good or bad could happen to these characters. How many times have we read a book almost hoping for a different ending? You get to imagine any ending you want with W&D.

Message Edited by pmath on 01-19-200712:12 PM

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chadadanielleKR
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Re: For Ilana: W&D


IlanaSimons wrote:
and, p.s.: my next Classic Book discussion will be Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier, starting in February


The book has just arrived today, I'll be there!
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Everyman
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Re: More Elizabeth Gaskell



pmath wrote:
Has everyone had enough of Elizabeth Gaskell, or would some of you be interested in reading Wives and Daughters next...



For myself, I prefer a range of authors to concentration on one. So I would prefer that we move through other writers -- Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Scott, Hardy, Trollope, Austen again, Dickens again, Collins, Richardson, other classic writers (is Woolfe a classic yet?) etc. -- before returning to more Gaskell.
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Laurel
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Re: More Elizabeth Gaskell



Everyman wrote:


pmath wrote:
Has everyone had enough of Elizabeth Gaskell, or would some of you be interested in reading Wives and Daughters next...



For myself, I prefer a range of authors to concentration on one. So I would prefer that we move through other writers -- Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Scott, Hardy, Trollope, Austen again, Dickens again, Collins, Richardson, other classic writers (is Woolfe a classic yet?) etc. -- before returning to more Gaskell.




Joseph Conrad, George Eliot, E.M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Thackeray.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: More Elizabeth Gaskell

Yes, definitely. Those too. And Chaucer, Bunyan, Stevenson, Butler, Chesterton, Lewis, Lamb, and on and on. And maybe a few sessions on some of the poets; Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Tennyson, Herbert, AE, and so many others -- the classic era British weren't much on music and painting, but they shone in poetry.

Lots to do before we get around to Gaskell again.



Laurel wrote:


Everyman wrote:


pmath wrote:
Has everyone had enough of Elizabeth Gaskell, or would some of you be interested in reading Wives and Daughters next...



For myself, I prefer a range of authors to concentration on one. So I would prefer that we move through other writers -- Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Scott, Hardy, Trollope, Austen again, Dickens again, Collins, Richardson, other classic writers (is Woolfe a classic yet?) etc. -- before returning to more Gaskell.




Joseph Conrad, George Eliot, E.M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Thackeray.


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More on MARY BARTON

I wish I could have seen it, too: I'm in the middle of reading the novel again right now, and I had forgotten just how very good it is! It is quite different from N&S in many ways, though: interestingly enough, N&S deals more squarely with conflicts, even though it is more upbeat.


Choisya wrote:
Sadly no pmath - Manchester is around 300 miles from where I live and it didn't get to London.

pmath wrote:
Choisya, did you get a chance to see this production?

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/entertainment/theatreanddance/s/222/222695_something_right_ab...

Choisya wrote:
I would rather do Mary Barton pmath because it is more of 'a piece' with North & South, even though it was written earlier.


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Laurel
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Re: More Elizabeth Gaskell



Laurel wrote:


Everyman wrote:


pmath wrote:
Has everyone had enough of Elizabeth Gaskell, or would some of you be interested in reading Wives and Daughters next...



For myself, I prefer a range of authors to concentration on one. So I would prefer that we move through other writers -- Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Scott, Hardy, Trollope, Austen again, Dickens again, Collins, Richardson, other classic writers (is Woolfe a classic yet?) etc. -- before returning to more Gaskell.




Joseph Conrad, George Eliot, E.M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Thackeray.




E.F. Benton
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Single-Author Study

I actually find it very instructive to read all the major works of an author in quick succession (as college/graduate students do for seminars, for example).


Everyman wrote:
For myself, I prefer a range of authors to concentration on one.

pmath wrote:
Has everyone had enough of Elizabeth Gaskell, or would some of you be interested in reading Wives and Daughters next...?

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Everyman
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Re: Single-Author Study



pmath wrote:
I actually find it very instructive to read all the major works of an author in quick succession (as college/graduate students do for seminars, for example).



If you and Choisya and LizzieAnn want to do a seminar on Gaskell, fine. But you asked for opinions, and I gave mine.

Actually, the Shakespeare thread will give us the opportunity to read all the works of of one author in succession, which should be rewarding.

If we were going to do a seminar on a single fiction writer here, there are several that I personally think are more rewarding to spend a chunk of time with than Gaskell. But since I'm not in the position yet to lead such a sequence, that will have to wait unless BN schedules it or somebody else wants to lead it.
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Elizabeth Gaskell's Work

[ Edited ]
Her work still seems to be underrated, as Jane Austen's once was, but perhaps interest in it will increase, as students become increasingly aware of classic literature by women, due to the efforts of female literary scholars.


Everyman wrote:
If we were going to do a seminar on a single fiction writer here, there are several that I personally think are more rewarding to spend a chunk of time with than Gaskell.

Message Edited by pmath on 01-20-200712:15 PM

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For Laurel: E. F. Benson, etc.

Plaurel, where did you first learn of Psmith, Lucia, etc.? PBS?


Laurel wrote:
E.F. Benton

Laurel wrote:
Joseph Conrad, George Eliot, E.M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Thackeray.

Everyman wrote:
...I would prefer that we move through other writers -- Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Scott, Hardy, Trollope, Austen again, Dickens again, Collins, Richardson, other classic writers (is Woolfe a classic yet?) etc. -- before returning to more Gaskell.


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Laurel
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Re: For Laurel: E. F. Benson, etc.



pmath wrote:
Plaurel, where did you first learn of Psmith, Lucia, etc.? PBS?


Laurel wrote:
E.F. Benton

Laurel wrote:
Joseph Conrad, George Eliot, E.M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Thackeray.

Everyman wrote:
...I would prefer that we move through other writers -- Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, Scott, Hardy, Trollope, Austen again, Dickens again, Collins, Richardson, other classic writers (is Woolfe a classic yet?) etc. -- before returning to more Gaskell.







Plet me think. I remember that when I was little my father had a book of P.G. Wodehouse's stories. I think it was called "Crime Wave at Blandings." That led me to Jeeves, and then to more Wodehouse. PBS did run the BBC "Jeeves and Wooster," but I'm not sure that it would have led me to the books. There is too much sublety in the books to work well on screen. I've listened to many Wodehouse audiobooks and love them, especially when read by Fredrick Davidson.

A friend of mine lent me a book of Benson's stories, and the dry, complicated humor and pathos took me immediately. There was one very sad story, called, I think, "The Green Dress." Then I read the Lucia books and smiled all the way through, and later I watched the excellent BBC series.

It would be interesting to compare Benton and Wodehouse. Both have a fairy tale quality, and yet--
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: What has been decided?

[ Edited ]
So what has been decided after all these suggestions? The suggestions of Thackeray & Forster seemed interesting because I do not recall BNU doing them recently and it might be good to do a British Classic novelist who had not been tackled for awhile. Austen, Hardy and Dickens were all read in BNU last year. (Does Benson appear in Classics lists over there because he doesn't in the UK.)

BTW I do not want to do a seminar on anything and had not offered to do so.

Message Edited by Choisya on 01-20-200712:00 PM

Message Edited by Choisya on 01-20-200712:53 PM

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Laurel
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Re: What has been decided?


Choisya wrote:
So what has been decided after all these suggestions? The suggestions of Thackeray & Forster seemed interesting because I do not recall BNU doing them recently and it might be good to do a British Classic novelist that had not been tackled for awhile. Austen, Hardy and Dickens were all read in BNU last year. (Does Benson appear in Classics lists over there because he doesn't in the UK.)12:00 PM




It seems that the momentum is for Pride and Prejudice first. That sounds good to me, and Feb. 12 would be a good start date. I think the suggestion of three weeks plus a week for films, critics, etc., would work well.

As for after Austen, we probably still have some discussing to do before we come to a decision. Thackery and Forester both sound good to me, but then so do all the others. I want it all!

No, Benson does not appear on classics lists over here, as far as I know. I don't think many people over here have ever heard of him. "Mapp and Lucia" is in the Penguin Modern Classics series, though. I think he'd give us a refreshing change some time when we need a little break from the nineteenth century. I think he's mahvelous.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: Elizabeth Gaskell's Work



pmath wrote:
Her work still seems to be underrated, as Jane Austen's once was, but perhaps interest in it will increase, as students become increasingly aware of classic literature by women, due to the efforts of female literary scholars.


Perhaps. Or perhaps it's in significant part because the continuing raft of PhD candidates in English are perpetually trying to find new topic areas for their theses, finding that the traditional writers have been done to death. "Discovering" lesser known authors is a fertile area for working in unplowed ground, with the added benefit that thesis examiners tend to know less about these authors, so are often less able to examine theses critically.

Similarly, tenure candidates are forever looking for ways to impress tenure committees with original writing about lesser-known authors. Another paper on Dickens will likely be less eagerly received by peer-reviewed journals than one analyzing the sociological impact on lending-library readers of The Mystery of Udolpho.

There are both male and female writers waiting to be "discovered," but in the present academic climate the female writers have a much better chance of receiving attention.
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Laurel
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Re: Elizabeth Gaskell's Work

I, for one, am glad to have found her, and I expect to be reading more of her works in the future.



Everyman wrote:


pmath wrote:
Her work still seems to be underrated, as Jane Austen's once was, but perhaps interest in it will increase, as students become increasingly aware of classic literature by women, due to the efforts of female literary scholars.


Perhaps. Or perhaps it's in significant part because the continuing raft of PhD candidates in English are perpetually trying to find new topic areas for their theses, finding that the traditional writers have been done to death. "Discovering" lesser known authors is a fertile area for working in unplowed ground, with the added benefit that thesis examiners tend to know less about these authors, so are often less able to examine theses critically.

Similarly, tenure candidates are forever looking for ways to impress tenure committees with original writing about lesser-known authors. Another paper on Dickens will likely be less eagerly received by peer-reviewed journals than one analyzing the sociological impact on lending-library readers of The Mystery of Udolpho.

There are both male and female writers waiting to be "discovered," but in the present academic climate the female writers have a much better chance of receiving attention.


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: Elizabeth Gaskell's Work

[ Edited ]
I am pleased to hear this Lauren because Gaskell rates alongside the other 'greats' over here and has been in print and on school and college reading lists since she was published. She is perhaps less known in the US because of her rather 'leftist' views on labour relations, as her writing about the Preston strike shows in N&S and her even more radical views in Mary Barton. I think you might also enjoy her biography of Charlotte Bronte:-

http://www.lang.nagoya-u.ac.jp/~matsuoka/EG-Charlotte-1.html





Laurel wrote:
I, for one, am glad to have found her, and I expect to be reading more of her works in the future.

Message Edited by Choisya on 01-20-200701:28 PM

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Everyman
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Re: Elizabeth Gaskell's Work


Laurel wrote:
I, for one, am glad to have found her, and I expect to be reading more of her works in the future.



I agree that she is worth finding, and I'm a bit surprised that one of your extensive background hadn't long since found her.

Maybe we need a thread here in the classics to bring to each other's attention authors we might not have yet been exposed to but who are well worth reading.

For example, is everybody aware that Kenneth Graham wrote not only The Wind in the Willows,; but also some delightful essays? Try his Pagan Papers or Dream Days.

I'm often surprised at the number of people who say "Charles Lamb, oh yes, wasn't he some sort of writer" but have never actually read The Essays of Elia. What a treat they're missing!

Charles Kingsley deserves, IMO, reading just as much as does Gaskell, not so much his Water Babies, which is better known but which I find one of the less compelling of his writings, but for example his Westward Ho and Hereward the Wake. But he is of the wrong gender to be discovered today.

There are lots of semi-forgotten writers out there; fortunately, we have some time here in the classic book club to explore them, if we have the will.
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