Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

P&P - The Bingleys

[ Edited ]
Our two male protagonists, Darcy & Bingley, along with Bingley’s relations have revealed their characters and attitude. What do you think of them?

Message Edited by LizzieAnn on 02-14-200707:30 PM

Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

P&P - Vol. 1 - Charles Bingley

He was quite young, wonderfully handsome, extremely agreable, and, to crown the whole, he meant to be at the next assembly with a large party. (Chapter 3)

Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
(Chapter 3)


With the first line, the stage is set even before most of the neighborhood (particularly the women) have even met him.

After the second: How could such a man be anything but admired, particularly by the young ladies in his neighborhood? Handsome, wealthy, eager to be pleased, easy to get along with. By the time he leaves the ball at Meryton, everyone likes him.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Vol. 1 - Charles Bingley



LizzieAnn wrote:
He was quite young, wonderfully handsome, extremely agreable, and, to crown the whole, he meant to be at the next assembly with a large party. (Chapter 3)

Mr. Bingley was good-looking and gentlemanlike; he had a pleasant countenance, and easy, unaffected manners.
(Chapter 3)




He seemed to be the charmer and everything appeared perfect with him. But wasn't his character alittle on the wishy washy side if he took to heart what his friend said? The conversation that concerned the closeness of Jane and he. And after talking to Darby, Bingley left Jane in distress.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Vol. 1 - Charles Bingley



kiakar wrote:
He seemed to be the charmer and everything appeared perfect with him. But wasn't his character a little on the wishy washy side if he took to heart what his friend said?

That's a nice point. Is Bingley really prepared to be the head of a household/family in that era where the husband was expected to be the boss? Of course, Jane will defer to him in anything. They're both so nice and sweet and non-assertive that every sharper or moocher in the neighborhood will take advantage of them.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

P&P - Vol. 1 - Mr. Bingley

”Whatever I do is done in a hurry,” replied he [Mr. Bingley] ”and therefore if I should resolve to quite Netherfield, I should probably be off in five minutes. At present, however, I consider myself as quite fixed here.” (BNCE, Chapter 9, page 43)

What does this say of Bingley? Of his attraction to Jane?
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Vol. 1 - Charles Bingley



Everyman wrote:


kiakar wrote:
He seemed to be the charmer and everything appeared perfect with him. But wasn't his character a little on the wishy washy side if he took to heart what his friend said?

That's a nice point. Is Bingley really prepared to be the head of a household/family in that era where the husband was expected to be the boss? Of course, Jane will defer to him in anything. They're both so nice and sweet and non-assertive that every sharper or moocher in the neighborhood will take advantage of them.




They are really both sweet and make a great couple. It is a shame Bingley's character is not of a stronger consistency so he would rally against Darby's insolent altitude concerning Jane. I have forgotten since reading P&P if the couple unite before the end so I am anxiously reading to see if this genial couple are united . Hopefully they will.
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

P&P - Caroline @ Netherfield

Caroline becomes a more complete character as we, along with Jane and Lizzy, visit Netherfield in chapters 8 through 12. When Jane visits there & is taken to bed, Lizzy visits her. This visit turns into a stay for the duration of Jane’s illness. We get to observe Caroline's actions & reactions to Lizzy. Any comments?


There’s some interesting interplay in chapter 11. It’s Jane’s first night with company. Bingley solicitously watches over her as Lizzy happily watches. Meanwhile, Mr. Darcy is trying to read the first volume of his book, and Caroline is trying to attract his attention. First, she pretends she’s reading the second volume of his book, and then she tries walking around the room. When that doesn’t work:

In the desperation of her feelings she resolved on one effort more; and, turning to Elizabeth, said, --

“Miss Eliza Bennet, let me persuade you to follow my example, and take a turn about the room. I assure you it is very refreshing after sitting so long in one attitude.”
(B&N Classics edition, page 56)


What do you think of this little by-play? Does it achieve its desired effect?
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Caroline @ Netherfield

It's such a delicious (yes, delicious!) little scene. It shows up what a shallow person she is, and how obvious she's being in trying to nab Darcy.

But no, it doesn't have its desired effect. Darcy's response is perfect, and it's clear she is in no way succeeding in attracting his romantic interest.

At one point, I thought that this scene perhaps rang a bit false that she is still trying these wiles at this point in her life. Darcy has been Bingley's good friend for some time, and surely she has had plenty of chances to try to impress Darcy. Is she such a dolt that she still hasn't seen any lack of interest? But then I realized that the reason for this was her growing suspicion of Darcy's interest in Elizabeth, and her feeling perhaps that she needs to get her hooks in sooner rather than later.

Perhaps she wants to walk with Lizzie because she thinks her more regal carriage and richer dress will impress on him how much higher class and more desirable she is than Elizabeth. Otherwise, why would she parade her rival in front of him?



LizzieAnn wrote:
Caroline becomes a more complete character as we, along with Jane and Lizzy, visit Netherfield in chapters 8 through 12. When Jane visits there & is taken to bed, Lizzy visits her. This visit turns into a stay for the duration of Jane’s illness. We get to observe Caroline's actions & reactions to Lizzy. Any comments?


There’s some interesting interplay in chapter 11. It’s Jane’s first night with company. Bingley solicitously watches over her as Lizzy happily watches. Meanwhile, Mr. Darcy is trying to read the first volume of his book, and Caroline is trying to attract his attention. First, she pretends she’s reading the second volume of his book, and then she tries walking around the room. When that doesn’t work:

In the desperation of her feelings she resolved on one effort more; and, turning to Elizabeth, said, --

“Miss Eliza Bennet, let me persuade you to follow my example, and take a turn about the room. I assure you it is very refreshing after sitting so long in one attitude.”
(B&N Classics edition, page 56)


What do you think of this little by-play? Does it achieve its desired effect?


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Caroline @ Netherfield

Exactly. I do think Caroline hopes considered superior to Lizzy. She's seen Darcy's growing interest in Lizzy, and even though she's aware that Darcy considers Lizzy beneath him, she's also aware of his growing fascination with her. She obviously cannot catch his attention on her own - no matter her agreeing with him, her teasing comments, her false laughter - he doesn't look at her as anything more than Charles' sister. Thereby, she's becoming more jealous and more desparate. This goads Caroline into actions or comments that cause him to respond in a manner that, ultimately, only would her.

For example, the first night Netherfield, after Lizzy had arrived at Netherfield with her petticoat all muddied, Caroline & Mrs. Hurst begin talking about her. Caroline to Darcy:

"I am afraid, Mr. Darcy," observed Miss Bingley, in a half whisper, "that this adventure has reather affected your admiration of her fine eyes."

"Not at all," he replied: "they were brightened by the exercise."
(Chapter 8)


She often tries to demean Lizzy and make her seem less; but, in reality, she's only demeaning herself.




Everyman wrote:
It's such a delicious (yes, delicious!) little scene. It shows up what a shallow person she is, and how obvious she's being in trying to nab Darcy.

But no, it doesn't have its desired effect. Darcy's response is perfect, and it's clear she is in no way succeeding in attracting his romantic interest.

At one point, I thought that this scene perhaps rang a bit false that she is still trying these wiles at this point in her life. Darcy has been Bingley's good friend for some time, and surely she has had plenty of chances to try to impress Darcy. Is she such a dolt that she still hasn't seen any lack of interest? But then I realized that the reason for this was her growing suspicion of Darcy's interest in Elizabeth, and her feeling perhaps that she needs to get her hooks in sooner rather than later.

Perhaps she wants to walk with Lizzie because she thinks her more regal carriage and richer dress will impress on him how much higher class and more desirable she is than Elizabeth. Otherwise, why would she parade her rival in front of him?


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Caroline @ Netherfield

I have read some commentators who think that it is Lizzy's on-foot expedition to Netherfield which is a main point in Darcy's growing interest in her. Not only her glowing visage, but the concern for a sister which would induce her to make such a trip, the vigor of person and personality it shows, and here willingness to take such a trip alone, which ladies just didn't do back then. The contrast between the active, vigorous Lizzy being blown into the house and the hot-house Miss Bingley sltting around doing her needlework must have made quite a contrast, and quite an impression on Darcy.



LizzieAnn wrote:
Exactly. I do think Caroline hopes considered superior to Lizzy. She's seen Darcy's growing interest in Lizzy, and even though she's aware that Darcy considers Lizzy beneath him, she's also aware of his growing fascination with her. She obviously cannot catch his attention on her own - no matter her agreeing with him, her teasing comments, her false laughter - he doesn't look at her as anything more than Charles' sister. Thereby, she's becoming more jealous and more desparate. This goads Caroline into actions or comments that cause him to respond in a manner that, ultimately, only would her.

For example, the first night Netherfield, after Lizzy had arrived at Netherfield with her petticoat all muddied, Caroline & Mrs. Hurst begin talking about her. Caroline to Darcy:

"I am afraid, Mr. Darcy," observed Miss Bingley, in a half whisper, "that this adventure has reather affected your admiration of her fine eyes."

"Not at all," he replied: "they were brightened by the exercise."
(Chapter 8)


She often tries to demean Lizzy and make her seem less; but, in reality, she's only demeaning herself.




Everyman wrote:
It's such a delicious (yes, delicious!) little scene. It shows up what a shallow person she is, and how obvious she's being in trying to nab Darcy.

But no, it doesn't have its desired effect. Darcy's response is perfect, and it's clear she is in no way succeeding in attracting his romantic interest.

At one point, I thought that this scene perhaps rang a bit false that she is still trying these wiles at this point in her life. Darcy has been Bingley's good friend for some time, and surely she has had plenty of chances to try to impress Darcy. Is she such a dolt that she still hasn't seen any lack of interest? But then I realized that the reason for this was her growing suspicion of Darcy's interest in Elizabeth, and her feeling perhaps that she needs to get her hooks in sooner rather than later.

Perhaps she wants to walk with Lizzie because she thinks her more regal carriage and richer dress will impress on him how much higher class and more desirable she is than Elizabeth. Otherwise, why would she parade her rival in front of him?





_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Caroline @ Netherfield

Except we've already seen his interest in her before. It's in chapter 6, during at party at the Lucas home that we learn he began an interest in her:

He had began to wish to know more of her; and, as a steop towards conversing with her himself, attended to her conversation with others. (page24-5)


Considering Mr. Darcy and his attitude toward her earlier, this is definitely a sign of interest. It's also at the end of the chapter and the party that:

"I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyese in the face of a pretty woman can bestow."

Miss Bingley immediately fixed her eyes on his face, and desired he would tell her what lady had the credit of inspiring such relfections. Mr. Darcy replied with great intrepidity,--

"Miss Elizabeth Bennet."
(page 28)


However, you're right in that her concern for her sister only seemed to increase his estimation of her. The time she spent in Netherfield and in his company, their increasing conversations, and his observations of her only advanced his interest. As it says in chapter 10, ...Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her." (page 52)



Everyman wrote:
I have read some commentators who think that it is Lizzy's on-foot expedition to Netherfield which is a main point in Darcy's growing interest in her. Not only her glowing visage, but the concern for a sister which would induce her to make such a trip, the vigor of person and personality it shows, and here willingness to take such a trip alone, which ladies just didn't do back then. The contrast between the active, vigorous Lizzy being blown into the house and the hot-house Miss Bingley sltting around doing her needlework must have made quite a contrast, and quite an impression on Darcy.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: P&P - Caroline @ Netherfield

Yes, it began in Chapter 6. But the idea is that it blossomed with the walk over to Netherfield and the time she spent thee.

LizzieAnn wrote:
Except we've already seen his interest in her before. It's in chapter 6, during at party at the Lucas home that we learn he began an interest in her:

He had began to wish to know more of her; and, as a steop towards conversing with her himself, attended to her conversation with others. (page24-5)


Considering Mr. Darcy and his attitude toward her earlier, this is definitely a sign of interest. It's also at the end of the chapter and the party that:

"I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyese in the face of a pretty woman can bestow."

Miss Bingley immediately fixed her eyes on his face, and desired he would tell her what lady had the credit of inspiring such relfections. Mr. Darcy replied with great intrepidity,--

"Miss Elizabeth Bennet."
(page 28)


However, you're right in that her concern for her sister only seemed to increase his estimation of her. The time she spent in Netherfield and in his company, their increasing conversations, and his observations of her only advanced his interest. As it says in chapter 10, ...Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her." (page 52)



Everyman wrote:
I have read some commentators who think that it is Lizzy's on-foot expedition to Netherfield which is a main point in Darcy's growing interest in her. Not only her glowing visage, but the concern for a sister which would induce her to make such a trip, the vigor of person and personality it shows, and here willingness to take such a trip alone, which ladies just didn't do back then. The contrast between the active, vigorous Lizzy being blown into the house and the hot-house Miss Bingley sltting around doing her needlework must have made quite a contrast, and quite an impression on Darcy.




_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Caroline's Jealousy

Caroline's interest in Darcy, and her jealousy of Darcy's interest in Lizzy is unfolded before us.

Miss Bingley was then sorry that she had proposed the delay; for her jealousy and dislike of one sister much exceeded her affection for the other. (Chapter 12, page 59)

Where else is Caroline's interest in Darcy and jealousy of Lizzy apparent?


Do you believe that Caroline has genuine feelings for Darcy, or that she is just hoping to become "Mrs. Darcy"? How do you think Darcy feels about Caroline?
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Caroline @ Netherfield Ball

The exchange between Lizzy & Caroline at the ball are extremely interesting. Caroline tries to warn Lizzy from believing whatever Wickham has said about Darcy, but Lizzy refuses to listen or believe her. Caroline seems to be issuing a genuine warning which doesn’t exactly fit with what we’ve seen of her. We know that Caroline’s interested in Darcy and jealous of Darcy’s interest in Lizzy. Why would she try to do her rival a good turn? Why would she try to steer her away from offending Darcy?

Any comments?
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Frequent Contributor
Cahill42
Posts: 53
Registered: ‎12-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Caroline @ Netherfield Ball

LizzieAnn wrote:
Caroline seems to be issuing a genuine warning which doesn’t exactly fit with what we’ve seen of her. We know that Caroline’s interested in Darcy and jealous of Darcy’s interest in Lizzy. Why would she try to do her rival a good turn? Why would she try to steer her away from offending Darcy?

My take on it is that Caroline knows exactly what she's doing when "warning" Lizzy. I think that Caroline knows that Lizzy will take her words with a grain of salt, or less. She's utilizing reverse pyschology and passive-agressive behavior to its highest. We already know that Caroline is a manipulative, conniving b***h, so why wouldn't she take this opportunity to push Lizzy further down in Darcy's estimation? I see Caroline as taking any opportunity to her advantage, and this situation is no different. She wants Darcy (or his position/money), and is willing to do anything to get him/it.
Destiny is a name often given in retrospect to choices that had dramatic consequences.---J.K. Rowling

I'm a leaf on the wind, watch me soar.---Wash
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Caroline @ Netherfield Ball

Our family watched the first half of Sound of Music for our Friday Family Night at the Movies (or, should I say, at the DVD). Your post echoed the scene at the end of the first half where the Countess goes in to talk to Maria about how the Admiral is in love with her. It is carefully calculated manipulation to get rid of a rival while pretending to be her friend. Miss Bingley and the Countess are two of a kind. Let's hope they both end up the same way -- failures.

Cahill42 wrote:
LizzieAnn wrote:
Caroline seems to be issuing a genuine warning which doesn’t exactly fit with what we’ve seen of her. We know that Caroline’s interested in Darcy and jealous of Darcy’s interest in Lizzy. Why would she try to do her rival a good turn? Why would she try to steer her away from offending Darcy?

My take on it is that Caroline knows exactly what she's doing when "warning" Lizzy. I think that Caroline knows that Lizzy will take her words with a grain of salt, or less. She's utilizing reverse pyschology and passive-agressive behavior to its highest. We already know that Caroline is a manipulative, conniving b***h, so why wouldn't she take this opportunity to push Lizzy further down in Darcy's estimation? I see Caroline as taking any opportunity to her advantage, and this situation is no different. She wants Darcy (or his position/money), and is willing to do anything to get him/it.


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
PaulK
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎11-02-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Caroline @ Netherfield Ball


LizzieAnn wrote:
The exchange between Lizzy & Caroline at the ball are extremely interesting. Caroline tries to warn Lizzy from believing whatever Wickham has said about Darcy, but Lizzy refuses to listen or believe her. Caroline seems to be issuing a genuine warning which doesn’t exactly fit with what we’ve seen of her. We know that Caroline’s interested in Darcy and jealous of Darcy’s interest in Lizzy. Why would she try to do her rival a good turn? Why would she try to steer her away from offending Darcy?

Any comments?



Liz certainly does not trust Miss Bingley or anything she says. It is interesting that Jane, who has also been making inquiries about Wickham's story, tends to give credit to Mr. Bingley's belief that Darcy could not have wronged Wickham as he described. Remember that the view that Miss Bingley is so terrible comes from Liz. Jane, however is treated very well by Miss Bingley.
The Bingley's are closely assciated with Darcy and if he turns out to be as bad as Wickham says than it could reflect on the Bingley's. Therefor Miss Bingley could be protecting herself and her brother. Also, if Miss Bingley really believes Darcy did not wrong Wickham she would want to set the record straight. I don't think that Miss Bingley is very worried that Jane may come to like Darcy. Her problem is that Darcy likes Jane.
Jane is both headstrong and jumps to quick conclusions.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Caroline @ Netherfield Ball

Your post brought back a memory of travelling by coach through Austria last year whilst watching The Sound of Music on the coach Video system - the first time I had seen it, and it seemed all the better with the Austrian countryside flashing by:smileyhappy:




Everyman wrote:
Our family watched the first half of Sound of Music for our Friday Family Night at the Movies (or, should I say, at the DVD). Your post echoed the scene at the end of the first half where the Countess goes in to talk to Maria about how the Admiral is in love with her. It is carefully calculated manipulation to get rid of a rival while pretending to be her friend. Miss Bingley and the Countess are two of a kind. Let's hope they both end up the same way -- failures.

Cahill42 wrote:
LizzieAnn wrote:
Caroline seems to be issuing a genuine warning which doesn’t exactly fit with what we’ve seen of her. We know that Caroline’s interested in Darcy and jealous of Darcy’s interest in Lizzy. Why would she try to do her rival a good turn? Why would she try to steer her away from offending Darcy?

My take on it is that Caroline knows exactly what she's doing when "warning" Lizzy. I think that Caroline knows that Lizzy will take her words with a grain of salt, or less. She's utilizing reverse pyschology and passive-agressive behavior to its highest. We already know that Caroline is a manipulative, conniving b***h, so why wouldn't she take this opportunity to push Lizzy further down in Darcy's estimation? I see Caroline as taking any opportunity to her advantage, and this situation is no different. She wants Darcy (or his position/money), and is willing to do anything to get him/it.





Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Caroline @ Netherfield Ball

You make a valid point. Great correlation between the Countess & Caroline. You also reminded be that it's been years since I've seen The Sound of Music!



Everyman wrote:
Our family watched the first half of Sound of Music for our Friday Family Night at the Movies (or, should I say, at the DVD). Your post echoed the scene at the end of the first half where the Countess goes in to talk to Maria about how the Admiral is in love with her. It is carefully calculated manipulation to get rid of a rival while pretending to be her friend. Miss Bingley and the Countess are two of a kind. Let's hope they both end up the same way -- failures.
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Caroline @ Netherfield Ball

I don't think that Lizzy would have accepted the possibility of Darcy being the wronged one from anyone. We already saw that she didn't accept it from Jane (and by extension Bingley), as well as Darcy himself or Caroline. She had already determined & accepted that all the blame is Darcy and Wickham is perfectly innocent. I don't think her dislike of Caroline made her more apt to disbelieve her in this case.



PaulK wrote:
Liz certainly does not trust Miss Bingley or anything she says. It is interesting that Jane, who has also been making inquiries about Wickham's story, tends to give credit to Mr. Bingley's belief that Darcy could not have wronged Wickham as he described. Remember that the view that Miss Bingley is so terrible comes from Liz. Jane, however is treated very well by Miss Bingley.
The Bingley's are closely assciated with Darcy and if he turns out to be as bad as Wickham says than it could reflect on the Bingley's. Therefor Miss Bingley could be protecting herself and her brother. Also, if Miss Bingley really believes Darcy did not wrong Wickham she would want to set the record straight. I don't think that Miss Bingley is very worried that Jane may come to like Darcy. Her problem is that Darcy likes Jane.
Jane is both headstrong and jumps to quick conclusions.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Top Kudoed Authors
User Kudos Count
1
1
Users Online
Currently online: 45 members 377 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: