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ladyfogg
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Re: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way

[ Edited ]
Hello all!

My name is Angela and I am a newcomer to the B&N Book Clubs...and I must say that I am very, very excited about being here. Especially with rumors of an upcoming Shakespeare Book Club. :smileyvery-happy: I was wondering - is there any further word on this and when it will begin? I'd hate to miss anything. :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by ladyfogg on 01-02-200703:47 PM

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IlanaSimons
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Re: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way



ladyfogg wrote:
Hello all!

My name is Angela and I am a newcomer to the B&N Book Clubs...and I must say that I am very, very excited about being here. Especially with rumors of an upcoming Shakespeare Book Club. :smileyvery-happy: I was wondering - is there any further word on this and when it will begin? I'd hate to miss anything. :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by ladyfogg on 01-02-200703:47 PM






I'm so glad you've joined us, Angela. The Shakespeare club will come this month. Stay tuned. I'll certanly put up a post as it gets started.
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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ladyfogg
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Re: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way

Thank you so much, Ilana! I can't wait to get started! I took a class on Shakespeare last semester in college and our professor was so frightfully boring - he basically just reread the text that we were suppose to read the night before back to us. I can't wait to have some real discussion on my favorite works! :smileyvery-happy:
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globe in the future

[ Edited ]
from smithsonianmag.com

Recasting Shakespeare's Stage
Designing a Globe Theatre for the 21st century

By Eric Jaffe

The tractor-trailer planted firmly in the Wal-Mart parking lot did not seem out of place, but the actors who performed Merchant of Venice right beside it sure did. When the vehicle arrived it deployed into a full-size stage. Behind the set, pneumatic pods inflated to become ticket-windows and dressing rooms. Sunlight powered the spotlights and speakers. And when the playhouse folded up and drove off, a screen mounted on the side of the trailer replayed the show for all to see.

This is the Globe Theatre—not the one that housed Shakespeare's best dramas, but one conceived by Jennifer Siegal for a modern audience. Siegal's Globe is part homage to the Elizabethan era's itinerant theatre troupe, part shout-out to today's compact, on-the-go gizmos. The Los Angeles-based architect was one of five designers asked to create a 21st-century Shakespearean theatre for "Reinventing the Globe," a new exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., that opens January 13 and runs through August 2007.

Given only brief guidance and a few months to finish, these architects created modern Globes that challenge conventional thoughts about dramatic performances and the spaces that accommodate them, says Martin Moeller, the exhibition's curator. "When the words stay the same but all else changes, you realize how much power the words have," he says.

Theatre designer John Coyne delivered a truly virtual Globe. To reflect today's cross-cultural world, Coyne's performances would occur simultaneously in several locations. Gigantic screens with live streaming would hang above the stages, and characters would interact in real time. So, speaking in Russian from Moscow, Polonius offers advice to Laertes in New York; standing oceans away, Hamlet pierces Claudius with a venom-tipped sword.

Michele (pronounced Mi-keleh) Saee, who did not have theatre design experience, modeled a Globe that would capture an actor's fluidity in the structure itself. He proposed tracing the movements of an actor throughout a performance using electronic monitors then, with the help of a computer, turning these motions into a three-dimensional image that would become the building. "It's like those photos at night where you see red and white lights streaking down the road," Moeller says. "It's almost like you have a history built into one image."

David Rockwell's transparent Globe is intended to erase the barrier between outdoor and indoor settings. H3, the architectural firm guided by Hugh Hardy, created a floating Globe that could bounce around to various New York City boroughs, like so many bar-hopping hipsters, as a way to increase public access.

Siegel, who is the founder of the Office of Mobile Design, says her portable Globe, dubbed the "Globetrotter," is ready to go into production with the right client.

"We're a mobile society that deals with communication devices in a compact way, and theatre can be represented in a similar take," she says. "It doesn't have to be going to this old, stodgy building. It could be much more accessible, transient and lighter."

In some ways, conceptualizing a Globe Theatre for the future requires as much imagination as re-creating the one that stood in Shakespeare's day. Despite the playhouse's prominence, historians still argue over many aspects of the theatre, says Franklin J. Hildy of the University of Maryland, an advisor to the London Globe reconstruction that opened in 1997.

Notable uncertainties include the shape of the stage (some say it was rectangular, others square); how many sides the structure had (with ranges from 16 to 24); even the size of the building itself (some call the diameter 100 feet across, others 90).

Globe reconstructions work off evidence from seven maps of London in that day, texts from Shakespeare's plays and a site excavation (the original theatre, built in 1599, burned down in 1613 and was restored in the same place). Perhaps the most crucial historical document is a contract to build the Fortune theatre, a contemporaneous playhouse, which instructs builders to copy many of the Globe's dimensions.

Of the Globe's certainties, the stage that jutted out into the crowd was one of its most impressive attributes, says Hildy. "Everywhere you looked there was life, audience, energy." Standing patrons, known as groundlings, surrounded the stage, often shouting at the actors, cracking hazelnut shells—even sitting on stage.

Though Shakespeare's work also appeared at the Rose and Curtain theatres, the Globe hosted most of his famous dramas—including Hamlet, King Lear and MacBeth—which explains part of its lasting allure, Hildy says.

"The sense has always been that you could feel a closer connection to Shakespeare if you could understand how he saw theatre, how he saw his plays staged," he says. "Shakespeare was working during one of the most successful periods that theatre has ever had. There seems to be a relationship between buildings and that success."

Message Edited by ziki on 01-11-200707:37 AM

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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: globe in the future

Great article, ziki. Thanks!
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: globe in the future

What a wonderful idea - a travelling Globe! I hope it comes here! There are some pics of it on the Smithsonian website:-

http://www.smithsonianmagazine.com/issues/2007/january/globe.php





ziki wrote:
from smithsonianmag.com

Recasting Shakespeare's Stage
Designing a Globe Theatre for the 21st century

By Eric Jaffe

The tractor-trailer planted firmly in the Wal-Mart parking lot did not seem out of place, but the actors who performed Merchant of Venice right beside it sure did. When the vehicle arrived it deployed into a full-size stage. Behind the set, pneumatic pods inflated to become ticket-windows and dressing rooms. Sunlight powered the spotlights and speakers. And when the playhouse folded up and drove off, a screen mounted on the side of the trailer replayed the show for all to see.

This is the Globe Theatre—not the one that housed Shakespeare's best dramas, but one conceived by Jennifer Siegal for a modern audience. Siegal's Globe is part homage to the Elizabethan era's itinerant theatre troupe, part shout-out to today's compact, on-the-go gizmos. The Los Angeles-based architect was one of five designers asked to create a 21st-century Shakespearean theatre for "Reinventing the Globe," a new exhibit at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., that opens January 13 and runs through August 2007.

Given only brief guidance and a few months to finish, these architects created modern Globes that challenge conventional thoughts about dramatic performances and the spaces that accommodate them, says Martin Moeller, the exhibition's curator. "When the words stay the same but all else changes, you realize how much power the words have," he says.

Theatre designer John Coyne delivered a truly virtual Globe. To reflect today's cross-cultural world, Coyne's performances would occur simultaneously in several locations. Gigantic screens with live streaming would hang above the stages, and characters would interact in real time. So, speaking in Russian from Moscow, Polonius offers advice to Laertes in New York; standing oceans away, Hamlet pierces Claudius with a venom-tipped sword.

Michele (pronounced Mi-keleh) Saee, who did not have theatre design experience, modeled a Globe that would capture an actor's fluidity in the structure itself. He proposed tracing the movements of an actor throughout a performance using electronic monitors then, with the help of a computer, turning these motions into a three-dimensional image that would become the building. "It's like those photos at night where you see red and white lights streaking down the road," Moeller says. "It's almost like you have a history built into one image."

David Rockwell's transparent Globe is intended to erase the barrier between outdoor and indoor settings. H3, the architectural firm guided by Hugh Hardy, created a floating Globe that could bounce around to various New York City boroughs, like so many bar-hopping hipsters, as a way to increase public access.

Siegel, who is the founder of the Office of Mobile Design, says her portable Globe, dubbed the "Globetrotter," is ready to go into production with the right client.

"We're a mobile society that deals with communication devices in a compact way, and theatre can be represented in a similar take," she says. "It doesn't have to be going to this old, stodgy building. It could be much more accessible, transient and lighter."

In some ways, conceptualizing a Globe Theatre for the future requires as much imagination as re-creating the one that stood in Shakespeare's day. Despite the playhouse's prominence, historians still argue over many aspects of the theatre, says Franklin J. Hildy of the University of Maryland, an advisor to the London Globe reconstruction that opened in 1997.

Notable uncertainties include the shape of the stage (some say it was rectangular, others square); how many sides the structure had (with ranges from 16 to 24); even the size of the building itself (some call the diameter 100 feet across, others 90).

Globe reconstructions work off evidence from seven maps of London in that day, texts from Shakespeare's plays and a site excavation (the original theatre, built in 1599, burned down in 1613 and was restored in the same place). Perhaps the most crucial historical document is a contract to build the Fortune theatre, a contemporaneous playhouse, which instructs builders to copy many of the Globe's dimensions.

Of the Globe's certainties, the stage that jutted out into the crowd was one of its most impressive attributes, says Hildy. "Everywhere you looked there was life, audience, energy." Standing patrons, known as groundlings, surrounded the stage, often shouting at the actors, cracking hazelnut shells—even sitting on stage.

Though Shakespeare's work also appeared at the Rose and Curtain theatres, the Globe hosted most of his famous dramas—including Hamlet, King Lear and MacBeth—which explains part of its lasting allure, Hildy says.

"The sense has always been that you could feel a closer connection to Shakespeare if you could understand how he saw theatre, how he saw his plays staged," he says. "Shakespeare was working during one of the most successful periods that theatre has ever had. There seems to be a relationship between buildings and that success."

Message Edited by ziki on 01-11-200707:37 AM




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confused_by_shakespeare
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-15-2007
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the DREADED shakepeare

I am an A2 english literature student, and i am retaking my shakespeare exam due to the mere fact that i failed it miserably as the majority of our year group did so.
i notice on this sute there is a passion for shakespeare...and regarding your question whether anyone is missing him..well..i surely am NOT!..shakespeare has put me me through many pains, i have never got to grips with his work.i studied twefth night for gcse and found it ok, i enjoyed the movie as much as i can enjoy shakespeare.
However, i am currently in a dilemma regarding "As You Like It"...and NO i do not like it!...i am sorry to seem like such a typical teenager (by the way im 17)..but shakespeare is not my kinda guy!
Anyway, back on to why i had orignally signed up to this site. Shakespeares stock characters lead me to abit of confusion, as i dont know who they are.My exam is on wednesday, and i know im squeezing it abit, but i would GREATLY appreciate if you could enlighten me upon the subject.Also does shakespeare say his true thoughts through Jacques or the country characters, if any at all?

Thankyou..

P.S i have tried to use good english here with no slang!..(hehe)..but deep down i am one of those...erm..very "typical" teenagers..

x
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: the DREADED shakepeare

[ Edited ]
Sorry to learn of your confusion but it is now a bit late for anyone to help you here. Two of our Shakespeare scholars are not available at the moment and it is not my area of expertise. I would suggest that you look at some of these online notes and analyses and keep a summation of them in mind for your examination. It may also help you to watch a DVD of the play if you can get hold of one at short notice (there is a very good 'old fashioned' one available starring Sir Laurence Olivier.)

http://www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/titles/asyoulikeit/section7.html

http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/asyoulikeit/canalysis.html

http://www.pinkmonkey.com/booknotes/barrons/aslikit.asp




confused_by_shakespeare wrote:
I am an A2 english literature student, and i am retaking my shakespeare exam due to the mere fact that i failed it miserably as the majority of our year group did so.
i notice on this sute there is a passion for shakespeare...and regarding your question whether anyone is missing him..well..i surely am NOT!..shakespeare has put me me through many pains, i have never got to grips with his work.i studied twefth night for gcse and found it ok, i enjoyed the movie as much as i can enjoy shakespeare.
However, i am currently in a dilemma regarding "As You Like It"...and NO i do not like it!...i am sorry to seem like such a typical teenager (by the way im 17)..but shakespeare is not my kinda guy!
Anyway, back on to why i had orignally signed up to this site. Shakespeares stock characters lead me to abit of confusion, as i dont know who they are.My exam is on wednesday, and i know im squeezing it abit, but i would GREATLY appreciate if you could enlighten me upon the subject.Also does shakespeare say his true thoughts through Jacques or the country characters, if any at all?

Thankyou..

P.S i have tried to use good english here with no slang!..(hehe)..but deep down i am one of those...erm..very "typical" teenagers..

x

Message Edited by Choisya on 01-16-200701:47 PM

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Everyman
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Re: the DREADED shakepeare



confused_by_shakespeare wrote:
I am an A2 english literature student, and i am retaking my shakespeare exam due to the mere fact that i failed it miserably as the majority of our year group did so...i am sorry to seem like such a typical teenager (by the way im 17)..but shakespeare is not my kinda guy! My exam is on wednesday, and i know im squeezing it abit, but i would GREATLY appreciate if you could enlighten me upon the subject.>



I have had a very limited time here recently because of some surgeries, so didn't see this message in time to write before your exam date, and don't have the ability to do much to help right at the moment. But I have to say that in my experience as a former high school English teacher, the most common problem teaching Shakespeare in high school is not Shakespeare himself, but those who teach him incompetently.

He does take a bit of getting used to. Just reading a play and writing an essay or test about it is NOT the best way to get introduced to him. But people in his day of much less intelligence and learning than you "got him" and loved him and laughed their heads off at him and wept with him. Once you start to learn about him properly, you'll come to feel the same way.

There will soon be a Shakespeare group starting here. Stick around and give a try and see whether you find some more enjoyable things about him.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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book-nut
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Registered: ‎11-25-2006
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Re: the DREADED shakepeare



confused_by_shakespeare wrote:
I am an A2 english literature student, and i am retaking my shakespeare exam due to the mere fact that i failed it miserably as the majority of our year group did so.
i notice on this sute there is a passion for shakespeare...and regarding your question whether anyone is missing him..well..i surely am NOT!..shakespeare has put me me through many pains, i have never got to grips with his work.i studied twefth night for gcse and found it ok, i enjoyed the movie as much as i can enjoy shakespeare.
However, i am currently in a dilemma regarding "As You Like It"...and NO i do not like it!...i am sorry to seem like such a typical teenager (by the way im 17)..but shakespeare is not my kinda guy!
Anyway, back on to why i had orignally signed up to this site. Shakespeares stock characters lead me to abit of confusion, as i dont know who they are.My exam is on wednesday, and i know im squeezing it abit, but i would GREATLY appreciate if you could enlighten me upon the subject.Also does shakespeare say his true thoughts through Jacques or the country characters, if any at all?

Thankyou..

P.S i have tried to use good english here with no slang!..(hehe)..but deep down i am one of those...erm..very "typical" teenagers..

x




I know I'm WAY too late to help with your exams, but may I suggest (for the future) that you become familiar with Spark Notes. In college, when I had trouble understanding a piece of writing, I would go chapter by chapter, first read the summary of the chapter in the Spark Notes, and after read the actual chapter in the piece of literature. Also, the advice about seeing movies is good ~ I don't know about "As you like it", but "Hamlet", "A Midsummer Night's Dream", and "Romeo and Juliet" (just a few examples) are all available in many different versions, everything from plays to modern-day remakes.
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Re: the DREADED shakepeare

Hey, what can I say? Perhaps you grow out of your hatred and desperation. Sometimes it takes a life time to learn to like a book....and sometimes you resort to reading Cosmopolitan and nothing else. The choice is yours. I don't get it quite right either with the Bard but I will make a wholehearted try. Besides I liked Romeo and Julia as a balet when I was a kid 7yo, 'twas pretty easy to understand and 'twas a start. We'll see where the road leads. Enjoy the walk and the re-views...

ziki
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Cara
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Re: The Bard: All Things Shakespeare

Was it William Carlos Williams who said "Shakespeare is the only university you need?" I love that quote and I feel it is so true! And for anyone who is struggling with the language, hang in there because it does suddenly "click" after enough exposure to it, it makes all the sense in the world to our modern ears and then the beauty of the words and imagery come shining through. I am looking forward to discussing the plays, perhaps some of the more "obscure" ones especially. Is the thread that is present in the forum that is discussing "A Midsummer Night's Dream" the one to go to for the arranged dialogues regarding the works? Thank you!
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KristyR
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Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: The Bard: All Things Shakespeare



Cara wrote:
Was it William Carlos Williams who said "Shakespeare is the only university you need?" I love that quote and I feel it is so true! And for anyone who is struggling with the language, hang in there because it does suddenly "click" after enough exposure to it, it makes all the sense in the world to our modern ears and then the beauty of the words and imagery come shining through. I am looking forward to discussing the plays, perhaps some of the more "obscure" ones especially. Is the thread that is present in the forum that is discussing "A Midsummer Night's Dream" the one to go to for the arranged dialogues regarding the works? Thank you!


Yes, head on over to the Midsummer Night's Dream thread. You've caught us at the very beginning of what will be a forum to discuss a new Shakespeare play each month. Welcome!
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: The Bard: All Things Shakespeare

Having just finished reading Moby Dick I am inclined to say the same thing about Melville:smileyhappy:




KristyR wrote:


Cara wrote:
Was it William Carlos Williams who said "Shakespeare is the only university you need?" I love that quote and I feel it is so true! And for anyone who is struggling with the language, hang in there because it does suddenly "click" after enough exposure to it, it makes all the sense in the world to our modern ears and then the beauty of the words and imagery come shining through. I am looking forward to discussing the plays, perhaps some of the more "obscure" ones especially. Is the thread that is present in the forum that is discussing "A Midsummer Night's Dream" the one to go to for the arranged dialogues regarding the works? Thank you!


Yes, head on over to the Midsummer Night's Dream thread. You've caught us at the very beginning of what will be a forum to discuss a new Shakespeare play each month. Welcome!


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