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Re: Slight Interruption: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way



LitEditor wrote:
Hi Everyone --

Sorry to interrupt your Twelfth Night discussion but (as I posted in the Shakespeare "planning" thread) --- we are working hard on making arrangements for a Shakespeare book club. This will be a permanent book club that will feature a focus on a new play every month (perhaps there will be a month devoted to sonnets as well). With over 30 plays to work with, that should give us plenty to do for some time!

You'll get notice in advance about which plays are scheduled for future months, to give you a chance to get the text and read ahead. We'll try to schedule a mix of the "big hits" and the less well-known plays.

It's a little early to say much more than that, but we're closing in on getting our moderator and the opening reading selection finalized, and I thought it made sense to clue this group in. More as we know it.

Thanks, as always, for your participation, enthusiasm, and ideas.

-Bill
Lit. and Fiction Editor, Barnes & Noble Book Clubs




This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.

ziki
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Re: Slight Interruption: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way



ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.

ziki





Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:
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Re: Slight Interruption: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way



Choisya wrote:


ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.

ziki





Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:




And a Shakespeare play, which only takes about three hours to read, is best read in one sitting--and then reread, reread, reread.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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to read shakespeare



Laurel wrote:And a Shakespeare play, which only takes about three hours to read, is best read in one sitting--and then reread, reread, reread.




hmmmm.... interesting suggestion...good...it's be fun when the Shakespeare thread comes up.

ziki
willing to learn from you all
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Re: Slight Interruption: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way



Choisya wrote:


ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.

ziki





Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:




Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.
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Re: Slight Interruption: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way



Everyman wrote:


Choisya wrote:


ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.

ziki





Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:




Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.




This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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Choisya
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Re: Slight Interruption: New Shakespeare Book Club on the Way

Sorry Ilana and Ziki - I had not intended any disrespect or hurt.




IlanaSimons wrote:


Everyman wrote:


Choisya wrote:


ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.

ziki





Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:









This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.


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NP-all's fine



Choisya wrote:
Sorry Ilana and Ziki - I had not intended any disrespect or hurt.





..and you didn't,no problem.

ziki
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For Ilana and Liz: Discussion of NORTH AND SOUTH

Ilana, during the discussion of The Return of the Native at BNU in March, a reader was driven away by criticism from other readers. A professional in the group cautioned us about the possible effects of such criticism on everyone, sharing a very sobering tale.

I'm withdrawing from BNBC discussions. Liz, would you, or someone else here, like to lead the discussion of North and South? (The schedule is in this message.)

Happy New Year, everyone!


IlanaSimons wrote:
This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.

Everyman wrote:
Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.

Choisya wrote:
Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:

ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.



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Re: For Ilana and Liz: Discussion of NORTH AND SOUTH

Pmath: I am very sorry indeed to learn that you are withdrawing from B&N discussions because I have found your contributions very interesting, and have appreciated your efforts to keep Twelfth Night going. I am not enough of a Shakespeare scholar to help further in that direction and would have hoped others would have joined in. I was also looking forward to our discussion of North & South, which you had suggested some time ago, as it is my favourite Gaskell novel (although I would not like to 'lead' it). I am also puzzled by the references to criticism here because I was not criticising Ziki in any way. I was just making a frivolous point about reading habits. I do hope your withdrawal is not because of illness or domestic problems and I hope that you have a very happy 2007.




pmath wrote:
Ilana, during the discussion of The Return of the Native at BNU in March, a reader was driven away by criticism from other readers. A professional in the group cautioned us about the possible effects of such criticism on everyone, sharing a very sobering tale.

I'm withdrawing from BNBC discussions. Liz, would you, or someone else here, like to lead the discussion of North and South? (The schedule is in this message.)

Happy New Year, everyone!


IlanaSimons wrote:
This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.

Everyman wrote:
Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.

Choisya wrote:
Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:

ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.






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For Choisya: Withdrawal

Choisya, Ilana wasn't responding to your post, as you can see below, and in the threaded view: she was protecting you! You remember what happened in March, and to whom, and by whom: I'm withdrawing because I don't want to be the next target. I hope the discussion returns to, and stays on, literature soon, so I can rejoin.

Thanks for the good wishes! I, too, was really looking forward to participating in a discussion of N&S. However, I still plan to follow the discussion: I'll miss you, Choisya, far too much if I don't!

People, if there is a problem, please let the moderator take care of it, as Ilana did here!


Choisya wrote:
Pmath: I am very sorry indeed to learn that you are withdrawing from B&N discussions because I have found your contributions very interesting, and have appreciated your efforts to keep Twelfth Night going. I am not enough of a Shakespeare scholar to help further in that direction and would have hoped others would have joined in. I was also looking forward to our discussion of North & South, which you had suggested some time ago, as it is my favourite Gaskell novel (although I would not like to 'lead' it). I am also puzzled by the references to criticism here because I was not criticising Ziki in any way. I was just making a frivolous point about reading habits. I do hope your withdrawal is not because of illness or domestic problems and I hope that you have a very happy 2007.




pmath wrote:
Ilana, during the discussion of The Return of the Native at BNU in March, a reader was driven away by criticism from other readers. A professional in the group cautioned us about the possible effects of such criticism on everyone, sharing a very sobering tale.

I'm withdrawing from BNBC discussions. Liz, would you, or someone else here, like to lead the discussion of North and South? (The schedule is in this message.)

Happy New Year, everyone!


IlanaSimons wrote:
This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.

Everyman wrote:
Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.

Choisya wrote:
Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:

ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.








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Re: For Choisya: Withdrawal

Pmath,
Your kindness comes through. Your literary comments are on target. Please drop into this community whenever the desire taps you.
Have a good New Year.
Ilana



pmath wrote:
Choisya, Ilana wasn't responding to your post, as you can see below, and in the threaded view: she was protecting you! You remember what happened in March, and to whom, and by whom: I'm withdrawing because I don't want to be the next target. I hope the discussion returns to, and stays on, literature soon, so I can rejoin.

Thanks for the good wishes! I, too, was really looking forward to participating in a discussion of N&S. However, I still plan to follow the discussion: I'll miss you, Choisya, far too much if I don't!

People, if there is a problem, please let the moderator take care of it, as Ilana did here!


Choisya wrote:
Pmath: I am very sorry indeed to learn that you are withdrawing from B&N discussions because I have found your contributions very interesting, and have appreciated your efforts to keep Twelfth Night going. I am not enough of a Shakespeare scholar to help further in that direction and would have hoped others would have joined in. I was also looking forward to our discussion of North & South, which you had suggested some time ago, as it is my favourite Gaskell novel (although I would not like to 'lead' it). I am also puzzled by the references to criticism here because I was not criticising Ziki in any way. I was just making a frivolous point about reading habits. I do hope your withdrawal is not because of illness or domestic problems and I hope that you have a very happy 2007.




pmath wrote:
Ilana, during the discussion of The Return of the Native at BNU in March, a reader was driven away by criticism from other readers. A professional in the group cautioned us about the possible effects of such criticism on everyone, sharing a very sobering tale.

I'm withdrawing from BNBC discussions. Liz, would you, or someone else here, like to lead the discussion of North and South? (The schedule is in this message.)

Happy New Year, everyone!


IlanaSimons wrote:
This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.

Everyman wrote:
Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.

Choisya wrote:
Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:

ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.














Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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For Ilana: Kindness

Ah, Ilana, Choisya and you have both moved me to tears, of joy! Thank you both for your kind words. BTW, I'll be following the discussion of The Metamorphosis, too: I'd been putting off reading it, because it sounded depressing, but I'll look for the humor in it instead, as you suggested.


IlanaSimons wrote:
Pmath,
Your kindness comes through. Your literary comments are on target. Please drop into this community whenever the desire taps you.
Have a good New Year.

pmath wrote:
Choisya, Ilana wasn't responding to your post, as you can see below, and in the threaded view: she was protecting you! You remember what happened in March, and to whom, and by whom: I'm withdrawing because I don't want to be the next target. I hope the discussion returns to, and stays on, literature soon, so I can rejoin.

Thanks for the good wishes! I, too, was really looking forward to participating in a discussion of N&S. However, I still plan to follow the discussion: I'll miss you, Choisya, far too much if I don't!

People, if there is a problem, please let the moderator take care of it, as Ilana did here!

Choisya wrote:
Pmath: I am very sorry indeed to learn that you are withdrawing from B&N discussions because I have found your contributions very interesting, and have appreciated your efforts to keep Twelfth Night going. I am not enough of a Shakespeare scholar to help further in that direction and would have hoped others would have joined in. I was also looking forward to our discussion of North & South, which you had suggested some time ago, as it is my favourite Gaskell novel (although I would not like to 'lead' it). I am also puzzled by the references to criticism here because I was not criticising Ziki in any way. I was just making a frivolous point about reading habits. I do hope your withdrawal is not because of illness or domestic problems and I hope that you have a very happy 2007.

pmath wrote:
Ilana, during the discussion of The Return of the Native at BNU in March, a reader was driven away by criticism from other readers. A professional in the group cautioned us about the possible effects of such criticism on everyone, sharing a very sobering tale.
I'm withdrawing from BNBC discussions. Liz, would you, or someone else here, like to lead the discussion of North and South? (The schedule is in this message.)

Happy New Year, everyone!


IlanaSimons wrote:
This is where I come in with a whistle and a striped shirt or something and say, you're our brilliant contributors. Be nice.

Everyman wrote:
Ziki's point, which you seem totally to have missed, is that consideration for new readers to the books is a virtue which some people, naming no names, tend not to recognize.

Choisya wrote:
Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:

ziki wrote:
This is great. A word of caution: the classic oldie gang of participants sometimes gets ahead of itself IMHO.....I still think it is totally fine to read the book paralelly with the ongoing, progressing discussion instead of just rushin' onward like a mad spring mountain river and have five read books under the belt and chat about 'em all at once left and right.

I therefore hope BNBC will pace it neatly.







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Re: For Ilana: Kindness



pmath wrote:
Ah, Ilana, Choisya and you have both moved me to tears, of joy! Thank you both for your kind words. BTW, I'll be following the discussion of The Metamorphosis, too: I'd been putting off reading it, because it sounded depressing, but I'll look for the humor in it instead, as you suggested.



Thanks for the sweet response.
I'm glad you'll be reading Kafka with the group, for humor. We just started discussing his humor in the "Discuss the Author" thread in the Kafka club. Elee posted a picture in which I thought Kafka looked a little like Charlie Chaplin. I said I thought Kafka does the slapstick shtick in words.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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Re: For philomath/ Kindness



pmath wrote:
BTW, I'll be following the discussion of The Metamorphosis, too: I'd been putting off reading it, because it sounded depressing, but I'll look for the humor in it instead, as you suggested.



yes philo,
do your number here as anybody else, NP.the stage is wide enough to accomodate all.
Shakespeare would smile. There's humor in every situation in life.We just need to take a step back and discover it.

ziki
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For Ziki: Comedy

Ziki:, here's a quote from a message I posted earlier, which you might enjoy!


pmath wrote (message linked here):
I was amused by this quote from a letter from Horace Walpole to Sir Horace Mann:
Recollect what I have said to you, that this world is a comedy to those who think, a tragedy to those who feel. This is the quint-essence of all I have learnt in fifty years!



ziki wrote:
Shakespeare would smile. There's humor in every situation in life.

pmath wrote:
BTW, I'll be following the discussion of The Metamorphosis, too: I'd been putting off reading it, because it sounded depressing, but I'll look for the humor in it instead, as you suggested.

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Re: Pmath - Kafka etc.

Thanks pmath - I understand now:smileysad: I look forward to seeing you post in Kafka although I must confess that I find his humour difficult to latch onto, perhaps because when I first read him 40 years ago, I was in a deep depression and he appealed to my sadder soul then. Perhaps you will be able to lead me to the humour.:smileyhappy: And I also look forward to your participation in North & South, not least because, as Ilana has said, your comments are always on target. To be honest though, I am not at all sure that the discussions not 'chaired' by Moderators will work, partly for the reasons you have hinted at here and partly because they are experts at guiding this particular form of online discussion.

I have just cleaned my house from top to bottom for New Year - in the old days we used to sweep dust from the front door to the back door but today I Dysoned it:smileyhappy: The coal, silver and cake are wrapped up in tinfoil outside and I await a tall, dark, gentleman passing by to 'first foot' at midnight:smileyvery-happy: (I miss my tall, dark haired father performing this old rite, which he did for all the ladies in the neighbourhood.:smileyhappy:) What sort of customs do you keep for New Year?

(I do wish we still had the photo facility because I would attach you a nice 'Peace & Love' card that I made for NY. I also have a super photo of my two cats sitting in front of my desk lamp 'heatbathing' when my central heating broke down at Xmas! BTW did you know that your Email facility here was not enabled?)




pmath wrote:
Ah, Ilana, Choisya and you have both moved me to tears, of joy! Thank you both for your kind words. BTW, I'll be following the discussion of The Metamorphosis, too: I'd been putting off reading it, because it sounded depressing, but I'll look for the humor in it instead, as you suggested.


IlanaSimons wrote:
Pmath,
Your kindness comes through. Your literary comments are on target. Please drop into this community whenever the desire taps you.
Have a good New Year.
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Everyman
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Re: Pmath - Kafka etc.

Choisya wrote: I await a tall, dark, gentleman passing by to 'first foot' at midnight

Send me the address, and I'll be glad to oblige.
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Re: Pmath - Kafka etc.



Choisya wrote:
Thanks pmath - I understand now:smileysad: I look forward to seeing you post in Kafka although I must confess that I find his humour difficult to latch onto, perhaps because when I first read him 40 years ago, I was in a deep depression and he appealed to my sadder soul then. Perhaps you will be able to lead me to the humour.:smileyhappy: And I also look forward to your participation in North & South, not least because, as Ilana has said, your comments are always on target. To be honest though, I am not at all sure that the discussions not 'chaired' by Moderators will work, partly for the reasons you have hinted at here and partly because they are experts at guiding this particular form of online discussion.

I have just cleaned my house from top to bottom for New Year - in the old days we used to sweep dust from the front door to the back door but today I Dysoned it:smileyhappy: The coal, silver and cake are wrapped up in tinfoil outside and I await a tall, dark, gentleman passing by to 'first foot' at midnight:smileyvery-happy: (I miss my tall, dark haired father performing this old rite, which he did for all the ladies in the neighbourhood.:smileyhappy:) What sort of customs do you keep for New Year?

(I do wish we still had the photo facility because I would attach you a nice 'Peace & Love' card that I made for NY. I also have a super photo of my two cats sitting in front of my desk lamp 'heatbathing' when my central heating broke down at Xmas! BTW did you know that your Email facility here was not enabled?)





post! post! any way you can lead us to em. I want pictures.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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For Choisya: THE WINSLOW BOY (Possible Spoilers)

Choisya, I don't know of any American New Year's Eve custom other than watching the ball fall in NYC's Times Square, in person or on television: it sounds boring compared to yours! BTW, we just got a Dyson, and I thought we were the only ones who used it as a verb: isn't that what Americans do, turn nouns into verbs?

Okay, I give in, but I'll stick to discussing N&S for the moment! Have you seen the film adaptation, by David Mamet, of The Winslow Boy? (BTW, Terence Rattigan's play is another great British classic we could discuss here!) I posted a message about it on the board for The Faith Club (linked here). Sir Robert Morton has some very memorable lines, and I often think of them at times like this. The quotes below are from the webpage linked here. As Ilana said earlier, we love you, Choisya!

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT
Will you yield?

SIR ROBERT
I will not yield, Mr. Speaker. You shall not side with the great against the powerless.

MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT
Yeah.

SIR ROBERT
Have you heard those words, gentlemen? Do you recognize their source? From that same source I add this injunction. It is this: what you do to the least of them you do to me. Now, now gentlemen....

...

SIR ROBERT
I wept today because right had been done.

CATHERINE
Not justice.

SIR ROBERT
No, not justice. Right. Easy to do justice, very hard to do right.

Choisya wrote:
Thanks pmath - I understand now:smileysad: I look forward to seeing you post in Kafka although I must confess that I find his humour difficult to latch onto, perhaps because when I first read him 40 years ago, I was in a deep depression and he appealed to my sadder soul then. Perhaps you will be able to lead me to the humour.:smileyhappy: And I also look forward to your participation in North & South, not least because, as Ilana has said, your comments are always on target. To be honest though, I am not at all sure that the discussions not 'chaired' by Moderators will work, partly for the reasons you have hinted at here and partly because they are experts at guiding this particular form of online discussion.

I have just cleaned my house from top to bottom for New Year - in the old days we used to sweep dust from the front door to the back door but today I Dysoned it:smileyhappy: The coal, silver and cake are wrapped up in tinfoil outside and I await a tall, dark, gentleman passing by to 'first foot' at midnight:smileyvery-happy: (I miss my tall, dark haired father performing this old rite, which he did for all the ladies in the neighbourhood.:smileyhappy:) What sort of customs do you keep for New Year?

pmath wrote:
Ah, Ilana, Choisya and you have both moved me to tears, of joy! Thank you both for your kind words. BTW, I'll be following the discussion of The Metamorphosis, too: I'd been putting off reading it, because it sounded depressing, but I'll look for the humor in it instead, as you suggested.

IlanaSimons wrote:
Pmath,
Your kindness comes through. Your literary comments are on target. Please drop into this community whenever the desire taps you.
Have a good New Year.

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