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Choisya
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Re: For Choisya: THE WINSLOW BOY (Possible Spoilers)

Oh for goodness sake Ilana and PMath - stop being so darned American. I'm a Brit you know!:smileyvery-happy:

(Yes, I know Mamet's Winslow Boy pmath - a very apt quotation:smileyhappy:




pmath wrote:
Choisya, I don't know of any American New Year's Eve custom other than watching the ball fall in NYC's Times Square, in person or on television: it sounds boring compared to yours! BTW, we just got a Dyson, and I thought we were the only ones who used it as a verb: isn't that what Americans do, turn nouns into verbs?

Okay, I give in, but I'll stick to discussing N&S for the moment! Have you seen the film adaptation, by David Mamet, of The Winslow Boy? (BTW, Terence Rattigan's play is another great British classic we could discuss here!) I posted a message about it on the board for The Faith Club (linked here). Sir Robert Morton has some very memorable lines, and I often think of them at times like this. The quotes below are from the webpage linked here. As Ilana said earlier, we love you, Choisya!
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new beginnings


pmath wrote:
Ilana, during the discussion of The Return of the Native at BNU in March, a reader was driven away by criticism from other readers. A professional in the group cautioned us about the possible effects of such criticism on everyone, sharing a very sobering tale.

I'm withdrawing from BNBC discussions. >





I got really flamed and attacked on some other discussions on old BNU, the moderator didn't do much about that but if you think of it what can they do? It's a question of temperament. And if we dare to be frank, the better. No one intends any harm, I am sure.

This is a quick medium, sometimes we misunderstand. Guys, just carry on happily. All mean well and that is the important part, people are engaged up to their ears. Fire sparkles.

I didn't want to cause any trouble by my original remark. We all have different levels of 'reading knowleadge' and we need to accomodate everyone.(See my other post about that).

CU in 2007
Have a nice New Year's Eve everyone!

ziki
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finding individual solutions


Choisya wrote:

ziki





Sometimes with 'oldies' ziki the books are already 'under our belts' - I had read most of the classics under discussion long ago and only needed my memory jogged to follow the threads. Others, of course, are fast readers and can quickly join the 'mountain river' swim:smileyhappy:




hehe, yes that is true. We are all on different levels and therefore it can be tricky to find the optimal solution that could fit everybody.perhaps that is not even possible but I think that the ambition here is to provide a 'parking lot' wide enough so that there's a convenient spot for everybody.

I think it will take some time to find and settle into this frame/rhythm and to find both the books and pace that suit the individual needs.
I am aware that is what we are presently doing so I do not see any problem with this phase.

ziki :-)
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Discussion of TWELFTH NIGHT

I started this thread after I read Choisya's message! Would you all like to continue discussing TN until the Shakespeare board opens?


Choisya wrote (message linked here):
...how did this thread become a 'planning' one? Laurel started the thread on the 7th December and Ilana, The Moderator, then posted 'Official now. This thread is for the discussion of Shakespeare.' (My italics.) So when does the 'planning' end and the 'discussion' begin? There have already been 50 posts and no outcome.
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Laurel
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Re: Discussion of TWELFTH NIGHT

Yes.



pmath wrote:
I started this thread after I read Choisya's message! Would you all like to continue discussing TN until the Shakespeare board opens?


Choisya wrote (message linked here):
...how did this thread become a 'planning' one? Laurel started the thread on the 7th December and Ilana, The Moderator, then posted 'Official now. This thread is for the discussion of Shakespeare.' (My italics.) So when does the 'planning' end and the 'discussion' begin? There have already been 50 posts and no outcome.



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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The Subtitle: WHAT YOU WILL

[ Edited ]
Great: it's my favorite of all of William Shakespeare's plays! Here's a link to a teacher's guide:

http://us.penguingroup.com/static/pdf/teachersguides/twelfth.pdf

I thought this, under "While Reading the Play," was interesting:

The subtitle What You Will has provoked much speculation. ...

Scholars have suggested that it is tied to the concept of the will as in willpower, willful, willing, etc.

Laurel wrote:
Yes.

pmath wrote:
Would you all like to continue discussing TN until the Shakespeare board opens?

Message Edited by pmath on 12-12-200610:03 AM

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leakybucket
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Re: The Subtitle: WHAT YOU WILL

Great resource. I printed it out for my Shakespeare futures. I have not read 12th Night yet and don't have the time right now, so I can't join in your discussions. I'll have to pick it up the next time around.

Bucky





pmath wrote:
Great: it's my favorite of all of William Shakespeare's plays! Here's a link to a teacher's guide:

http://us.penguingroup.com/static/pdf/teachersguides/twelfth.pdf

I thought this, under "While Reading the Play," was interesting:

The subtitle What You Will has provoked much speculation. ...

Scholars have suggested that it is tied to the concept of the will as in willpower, willful, willing, etc.

Laurel wrote:
Yes.

pmath wrote:
Would you all like to continue discussing TN until the Shakespeare board opens?

Message Edited by pmath on 12-12-200610:03 AM




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For Bucky: Trevor Nunn's film adaptation of TWELFTH NIGHT

Bucky, there's a very good film version you could watch instead, if you'd like to at least follow our discussion:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=014381135626


leakybucket wrote:
Great resource. I printed it out for my Shakespeare futures. I have not read 12th Night yet and don't have the time right now, so I can't join in your discussions. I'll have to pick it up the next time around.

pmath wrote:
Here's a link to a teacher's guide:

http://us.penguingroup.com/static/pdf/teachersguides/twelfth.pdf

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leakybucket
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Re: For Bucky: Trevor Nunn's film adaptation of TWELFTH NIGHT

Oh, I have to laugh. I bought this already for the old BNU Shakespeare comedy class. It is sitting on my shelf unopened!

Thanks for the tip. I'll watch it tonight.

Bucky



pmath wrote:
Bucky, there's a very good film version you could watch instead, if you'd like to at least follow our discussion:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=014381135626


leakybucket wrote:
Great resource. I printed it out for my Shakespeare futures. I have not read 12th Night yet and don't have the time right now, so I can't join in your discussions. I'll have to pick it up the next time around.

pmath wrote:
Here's a link to a teacher's guide:

http://us.penguingroup.com/static/pdf/teachersguides/twelfth.pdf




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More Fun for Bucky: SHE'S THE MAN

You're welcome, Bucky: let us know what you think! I also enjoyed this present-day, loose adaptation:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=097361178028


leakybucket wrote:
Thanks for the tip. I'll watch it tonight.

pmath wrote:
Bucky, there's a very good film version you could watch instead, if you'd like to at least follow our discussion:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?EAN=014381135626


leakybucket wrote:
I have not read 12th Night yet and don't have the time right now, so I can't join in your discussions.


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Choisya
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Re: William Shakespeare's TWELFTH NIGHT : Some games for Xmas

(May be Plot Spoilers here)

As is is the Merry Season, here are some quiz games set around Twelfth Night (from school revision papers):-

Shakespeare has an accident:
http://www.twelfthnightsite.co.uk/act3/twelfth.htm

A quiz covering the whole of the play:
http://www.twelfthnightsite.co.uk/plot.htm

Penalty shootout with characters:
http://www.twelfthnightsite.co.uk/shakespeare_shootout.htm

Some general questions - walking the plank:
http://www.twelfthnightsite.co.uk/walk_twelfth.htm

More questions - basketball game:
http://www.twelfthnightsite.co.uk/hoopshoot_twelfth.htm

We wouldn't do this to Ilana would we?:smileyhappy:
http://www.twelfthnightsite.co.uk/fling/twelfthnight/fling.htm
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Edmund Blair Leighton's OLIVIA

[ Edited ]
Thanks, Choisya: those are fun! I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133


Choisya wrote:
As is is the Merry Season, here are some quiz games set around Twelfth Night...

Message Edited by pmath on 12-13-200602:30 PM

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Choisya
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Re: Edward Blair Leighton's OLIVIA



pmath wrote:
Thanks, Choisya: those are fun! I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133


Choisya wrote:
As is is the Merry Season, here are some quiz games set around Twelfth Night...







I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!
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Wild Wilde

Why?


Choisya wrote:
I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!

pmath wrote:
I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133

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Choisya
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Re: Wild Wilde

Because Leighton was such a beautiful fellow!:smileyhappy:




pmath wrote:
Why?


Choisya wrote:
I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!

pmath wrote:
I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133




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More on Leighton's OLIVIA

Choisya, it's by Leighton: do you think it's also a self-portrait? In the photographs I found on the Web, he has a large moustache!


Choisya wrote:
Because Leighton was such a beautiful fellow!:smileyhappy:

pmath wrote:
Why?

Choisya wrote:
I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!

pmath wrote:
I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133



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Choisya
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Re: More on Leighton's OLIVIA

[ Edited ]
Ooooops!! I thought it was a bloke cross-dressing:smileyhappy:



pmath wrote:
Choisya, it's by Leighton: do you think it's also a self-portrait? In the photographs I found on the Web, he has a large moustache!


Choisya wrote:
Because Leighton was such a beautiful fellow!:smileyhappy:

pmath wrote:
Why?

Choisya wrote:
I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!

pmath wrote:
I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133





Message Edited by Choisya on 12-14-200606:37 PM

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TWELFTH NIGHT: Male Actors in Female Roles

[ Edited ]
Well, it would have been accurate if it indeed was! Do you know if Pre-Raphaelites used young men as models for females?

In Shakespeare's time, Viola's successful deception was probably more credible, since the actor portraying Viola actually was male: in all the productions of Twelfth Night I've seen, Viola disguised as Cesario still looked like the woman the actress portraying her was. Has anyone seen a credible Cesario?


Choisya wrote:
Ooooops!! I thought it was a bloke cross-dressing:smileyhappy:

pmath wrote:
Choisya, it's by Leighton: do you think it's also a self-portrait?

Choisya wrote:
Because Leighton was such a beautiful fellow!:smileyhappy:

pmath wrote:
Why?

Choisya wrote:
I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!

pmath wrote:
I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133





Message Edited by pmath on 12-15-200607:51 AM

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Choisya
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Re: TWELFTH NIGHT: Male Actors in Female Roles etc

Despite this being a very seasonable play, the discussion seems to have ground to a halt. Perhaps folks will resurrect it next Xmas when the new Shakespeare club is up and running?




pmath wrote:
Well, it would have been accurate if it indeed was! Do you know if Pre-Raphaelites used young men as models for females?

In Shakespeare's time, Viola's successful deception was probably more credible, since the actor portraying Viola actually was male: in all the productions of Twelfth Night I've seen, Viola disguised as Cesario still looked like the woman the actress portraying her was. Has anyone seen a credible Cesario?


Choisya wrote:
Ooooops!! I thought it was a bloke cross-dressing:smileyhappy:

pmath wrote:
Choisya, it's by Leighton: do you think it's also a self-portrait?

Choisya wrote:
Because Leighton was such a beautiful fellow!:smileyhappy:

pmath wrote:
Why?

Choisya wrote:
I bet that portrait drove Oscar Wilde wild!

pmath wrote:
I found this lovely depiction of Olivia:

http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=133





Message Edited by pmath on 12-15-200607:51 AM




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Everyman
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Re: TWELFTH NIGHT: Male Actors in Female Roles etc

Despite this being a very seasonable play, the discussion seems to have ground to a halt. Perhaps folks will resurrect it next Xmas when the new Shakespeare club is up and running?

Some of us are waiting for the official Shakespeare section to do our serious discussion.
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