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Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


TiggerBear wrote:
I wanted to thank you. I came across your books from the oposite end. Oh that movie was a book, which one. I've read 3 so far. All excellent.
 
Jackie Brown, the movie, was based on my novel, Rum Punch 

 

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Phillygirl54
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Registered: ‎05-19-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Hello Mr. Leonard! I believe this is the reason you are my favorite author. You really have to care about your characters, I think. Also your sense of humor and timing can't be beat!

Elmore_Leonard_1 wrote:

virginiaanne wrote:

I'm a new fan.  I read Road Dogs first and couldn't put it down.  While I was reading Out of Sight, my brother picked up Road Dogs and wasn't rooting for the Foley character at the beginning.  At the end of both books, though, as a reader, I was breathing a sigh of relief that he was still alive.  I am such a fan of the writing style, and how human each character is.  I look forward to reading much more!

 

What authors have made you want to read everything they've written?

  --You get what I'm trying to do.
--Heingway certainly, then Richard Bissell and maybe Steinbeck.  Today I consider Cormac McCarthy a must-read. 

 


 

Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


Phillygirl54 wrote:
Hello Mr. Leonard! I believe this is the reason you are my favorite author. You really have to care about your characters, I think. Also your sense of humor and timing can't be beat!

--Thank you.  I have affection for all my characters, even the bad guys.  One exception is Teddy Magyk, the homicidal psychopath, in Glitz.

 

Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


PaulH wrote:

Elmore Leonard wrote:

 

"Today I consider Cormac McCarthy a must-read. "


I couldn't agree with you more, Mr. Leonard. Do you have a favorite? As a Western writer yourself, do you favor his Border Trilogy, as opposed to say, Suttree?


--No Country for Old Men is my favorite.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


Elmore_Leonard_1 wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:
I wanted to thank you. I came across your books from the oposite end. Oh that movie was a book, which one. I've read 3 so far. All excellent.
 
Jackie Brown, the movie, was based on my novel, Rum Punch 

 


Indeed. The book that got me started.

New User
DSM14
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Registered: ‎05-19-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Mr. Leonard, I have been an admirer of your work since before Glitz and have read all of your non-Westerns (although I am not totally sure I was able to find Unknown Man No. 89) and most of your Westerns. Thank you for hundreds of hours of enjoyment, excitement and lauighter. 

 

I enjoyed Road Dogs. Do you plan on bringing back any more of your memorable past characters, such as Jake LaBrava, Chili Palmer or Karen Sisco?

 

In addition, my sense is that, for the past 2 decades, your books became more humorous and less hard-edged--almost as if you began (52 Pickup; City Primeval, etc) as Richard Stark and then became Donald Westlake, without his switching off between his two personnas. I would appreciate your comment.

 

Finally, do you plan to write another Western novel?

Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


DSM14 wrote: . 

 

I enjoyed Road Dogs. Do you plan on bringing back any more of your memorable past characters, such as Jake LaBrava, Chili Palmer or Karen Sisco?

 

Maybe Karen.  I started a book with Karen Sisco then switched to the book I'm writing now called Djibouti.  I'm on page 139. 

 

In addition, my sense is that, for the past 2 decades, your books became more humorous and less hard-edged--almost as if you began (52 Pickup; City Primeval, etc) as Richard Stark and then became Donald Westlake, without his switching off between his two personnas. I would appreciate your comment.

 

 I don't know that they got less hard edged, I just think I'm more relaxed.

 

 

Finally, do you plan to write another Western novel?

 

I think about it, but there isn't much of a market for westerns these days. 


 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Dear Mr. Leonard,Tishomingo Blues is at my nephews house,I will take it back and re-read it..I believe there is an audience for westerns..Edgy,lusty(you do that so well),with a bit of your humor we are always fascinated by their lifestyle..another generation of readers of your books,male and female has emerged,My nephew is 25,and he has read most of your novels"Road Dogs" on his wish list.Even though Laura Lael Miller is considered a Romance Writer,you could capture that audience(me,and thousands of others) with a trilogy, ,only a thought.Its been great reading your responses....Thanks for taking the time to be here on BN,VtCozy   
Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


Vermontcozy wrote:
Dear Mr. Leonard,
you could capture that audience(me,and thousands of others) with a trilogy, ,only a thought.Its been great reading your responses....Thanks for taking the time to be here on BN,VtCozy   
 
I already wrote a trilogy.  My Carl Webster books, The Hot Kid, Comfort to the Enemy and Up in Honey's Room.  I didn't start out to write three books in a row with the same character, but that's what happen.
The Hot Kid is set from the early 1920s to 1934.  Comfort to the Enemy and Up in Honey's Room pick up Carl in the 1940s. 
Comfort to the Enemy originally appeared as a serial novel in The New York Times Sunday Magazine.  Last month it was published as a book in England, but not in the U.S.  My friend, Otto Penzler, is talking about bringing it out over here. 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

  Thank you for enlightening me..Publishing "Comfort for the Enemy" as a stand alone book in the states will be welcomed...I am now going to take a look at The Hot Kid" "Up in Honeys Room.  My brother calls your books comfort food for his soul.. Enjoy you Stay on Bn..what a treat for us..VtCozy 
Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Contributor
jp1025
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Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Hey Mr. Leonard,

 

I've been a fan since I read LABRAVA while on college spring break in 1984. Since then, I've read everything you've ever published; westerns  and short stories included. I'm especially partial to the Florida stories. There's just something about the tropical setting, the scenery just jumps off the page at me. As far as Florida writers, I thought Willeford was certainly in the same class as you, if not your equal, and today both Carl Hiaasen and Jim Hall are among my favorites. So two questions, please.

 

1) Which of the current "Florida" writers do you personally enjoy?

 

2) Foley was released from prison in Florida, but the ROAD DOGS action quickly moved to California. Will you ever set another novel in the sunshine state?

 

John

New York, New York

Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


jp1025 wrote:

Hey Mr. Leonard,

 

I've been a fan since I read LABRAVA while on college spring break in 1984. Since then, I've read everything you've ever published; westerns  and short stories included. I'm especially partial to the Florida stories. There's just something about the tropical setting, the scenery just jumps off the page at me. As far as Florida writers, I thought Willeford was certainly in the same class as you, if not your equal, and today both Carl Hiaasen and Jim Hall are among my favorites. So two questions, please.

 

1) Which of the current "Florida" writers do you personally enjoy?

 

--Carl Hiaasen, Jim Hall and Jim Born.

 

  Will you ever set another novel in the sunshine state?

 

--It's possible.  I like Florida.  I could easily set another book there.

 

New User
Scrawlers
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-21-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Hi Elmore,

 

I've been reading your work since I was fifteen (I'm thirty now) and my friends and family always know when you have a new book coming out soon because I won't shut up about it. Out of Sight is one of my favorite stories and I wrote an analysis about it for my final examinations to earn my MFA in Creative Writing last spring. I have a few questions for you and I appreciate the time you're taking to answer my and other peoples' questions.

 

1. I enjoy the way you introduce unique, distinct characters and then let them play with each other as the story develops (Tishomingo Blues comes to mind right away).  I wonder if, in your writing process, you first have an idea of events within the story or if you prefer to start with an idea for a character(s)? If you've tried both of these approaches, why do you find one more successful than the other?

 

2. Your supporting characters are fun to read about. When you're creating characters like The Mutt in Pagan Babies, Glenn in Get Shorty, and Arlen in Tishomingo Blues, what helps you create someone who's memorable and compelling without stealing focus from your main story? Do you have plans for a new short story collection featuring supporting characters? You spoiled me with the tale of Chickasaw Charlie in When the Women Come Out to Dance.

 

3. Given your enjoyment of the film adaptations of Get Shorty and Out of Sight, did the thought of seeing satisfying film sequels spur you at all to write Be Cool and Road Dogs? If not, what compelled you to re-visit Chili and Foley?

 

4. I'm a big fan of listening to your work as an audio book on road trips (I think George Guidall reading Cuba Libre is particularly excellent). What level of involvement do you usually have in these presentations? What is your favorite audio presentation of one of your books? Do you ever listen to audio books for your own reading pleasure?

 

5. Will we see you in Minnesota any time soon? :smileyhappy:

 

Thank you for your time and talent. I'm truly thrilled to correspond with you here and I look forward to your reply.

 

Regards,

 

Nathan Melcher

 

 

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Palmaltas
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Registered: ‎05-21-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

I have read 19 of your books--so far--and fell in love from the very first one I read, which was Glitz. If I remember correctly, you mentioned the Carmen Apartmentments in PR and I had a friend who lived there. But my overall favorites are The Hunted, Stick, Bandits, and Out of Sight. It is with the greatest of pleasure that I pick up an Elmore Leonard and delve into a world of quirky characters and entertaining dialogue.

Thank you so much!

Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

 
 

Scrawlers wrote:

Hi Elmore,

 

  I wonder if, in your writing process, you first have an idea of events within the story or if you prefer to start with an idea for a character(s)? If you've tried both of these approaches, why do you find one more successful than the other?

 

--The way I approach it, I always start with characters and  then fit them into a situation or place, like a town in Mississippi for example  I usually have an occupation for a character.  Like in Tishomingo Blues,

Dennis is the high diver goes who dives off an 80 foot ladder into a 20 foot wide pool that is 9 feet deep. Up on his perch, Dennis witnesses a murder down at the base. So then I think about more characters and give them names and backgrounds.

 

2. Your supporting characters are fun to read about. When you're creating characters like The Mutt in Pagan Babies, Glenn in Get Shorty, and Arlen in Tishomingo Blues, what helps you create someone who's memorable and compelling without stealing focus from your main story?

 

 

 --I don't want to create an obvious character.  I want an interesting one who the reader will want to know about.  Often they are cast against the obvious type.

 

 

Do you have plans for a new short story collection featuring supporting characters? 

 

--I don't really write short stories unless someone, like Otto Penzler, asks me.

 

 

did the thought of seeing satisfying film sequels spur you at all to write Be Cool and Road Dogs? If not, what compelled you to re-visit Chili and Foley?

 

 

 

--Definitely Chili.  I though for sure they'd want another one.  Too bad the sequel was such a terrible movie.  Road Dogs, I don't think of it so much as a sequel.  I just liked the characters so I used them again.  But if George Clooney wants to play the part, I'm all for it.

 

 

 

 

4. I'm a big fan of listening to your work as an audio book on road trips (I think George Guidall reading Cuba Libre is particularly excellent). What level of involvement do you usually have in these presentations?

 

--None. 

 

What is your favorite audio presentation of one of your books?

 

--Never listened to any. 

 

Do you ever listen to audio books for your own reading pleasure?

 

--Never. 

 

5. Will we see you in Minnesota any time soon? :smileyhappy:

 

--i wouldn't mind going to Minneapolis again, but  I have no plans 

 

 

 

 

 


 

New User
Scrawlers
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

[ Edited ]

Hi Elmore,

 

Thank you for answering my questions yesterday and everyone's questions this week, I appreciate it. I came up with a few more, if you'll indulge me.

 

1. Where do you like to write and at what time of day? Do you write every day or have some sort of ritualistic behavior when it comes to sitting down to write? How much of your writing time is spent researching or reviewing Gregg's research?

 

2. I've read that your Ten Rules of Writing began as a tongue-in-cheek presentation for a speech before revising them for the New York Times. And yet, I wonder which of these rules have been part of your arsenal for the longest? Do you have any particular instances in your writing career when you can identify when a writing rule first manifested for you? Is there one in particular you wish more writers followed?

 

3. Who did you read when you were first starting out and how did they influence or inspire your work? Who specifically do you recommend an apsiring fiction writer read today and why?

 

4. What's the one question you're never asked by your fans or in interviews that you wish someone would ask? Of course, you're welcome to answer that question here, as well. :smileyhappy:

 

5. What can you tell us about your upcoming novel, Djibouti?

 

Thanks again,

 

Nathan Melcher

Message Edited by Scrawlers on 05-22-2009 01:09 AM
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Thanks to all who have made this week's event with Elmore Leonard lively and interesting. Remember, today is the last day that the author will be here, but you still have time to post your questions and comments! We look forward to hearing from everyone about all of Elmore's work.

 

Happy weekend!

 

Bethanne 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Where do you like to write and at what time of day?

 

--In the living room all day, 10-6

 

Do you write every day

 

--Yes

 

[Do you] have some sort of ritualistic behavior when it comes to sitting down to write?

 

--I try to read a page or so of a previous book, it could be an old one, just to get in the rhythm of the writing.

 

How much of your writing time is spent researching or reviewing Gregg's research?

 

--I'm not sure what percentage of my time, but I always read the pages he sends me.  

 

I've read that your Ten Rules of Writing began as a tongue-in-cheek presentation for a speech before revising them for the New York Times. And yet, I wonder which of these rules have been part of your arsenal for the longest?

 

--"Try to leave out the parts that people tend to skip" and "If it sounds like writing I rewrite it."

 

Do you have any particular instances in your writing career when you can identify when a writing rule first manifested for you?

 

--I think most of the rules came from reading other writers, those that use "suddenly" and "all hell broke loose."

 

Is there one [rule] in particular you wish more writers followed?

 

--That they would use ""said" when indicating dialog and not modify it with an adverb.   

 

 

Who did you read when you were first starting out

 

--Hemingway.

 

[H]ow did [he] influence or inspire your work?

 

--By being very spare in his writing, not overdoing it.

 

Who specifically do you recommend an apsiring fiction writer read today and why?

 

--Cormac McCarthy because he knows how to write. 

 

What's the one question you're never asked by your fans or in interviews that you wish someone would ask?

 

--None comes to mind.

  

What can you tell us about your upcoming novel, Djibouti?

 

--A documentary film maker is investigating the Somali pirates with a sympathetic point of view and soon finds out that that maybe Al Queda is involved.   

Author
Elmore_Leonard_1
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎05-18-2009

Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22


Bethanne wrote:

Thanks to all who have made this week's event with Elmore Leonard lively and interesting. Remember, today is the last day that the author will be here, but you still have time to post your questions and comments! We look forward to hearing from everyone about all of Elmore's work.

 

Happy weekend!

 

Bethanne 


Thank you, Bethanne, nice job.  There have been some very good questions.  Visit Elmoreleonard.com, if you want to comment or ask me something after this week.  My researcher, Gregg will make sure I see your posts.

 

New User
Sassenach45
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Registered: ‎05-22-2009
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Re: Elmore Leonard, May 18-22

Dear Mr. Leonard:  I just want to say how much I have enjoyed all of your books and am looking forward to reading your latest.  There are only a few authors whose books I buy as they come out and keep to re-read again and you are at the top of my list!! Thanks for the hours of entertainment you have given.