Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Blogger
LisaSteinke
Posts: 369
Registered: ‎07-20-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Jennifer,

 

You do such a great job of using social networking sites to connect with fans.  What are your thoughts on how these sites are changing the publishing world and PR?

 

Lisa

www.chicklitisnotdead.com
Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I try not to think about "could this work as a movie?" while I'm writing -- if I did, I guarantee I'd never write about a single woman bigger than a size four ever again -- but, now that the writing's done, I think BEST FRIENDS FOREVER could be a decent movie. It's got adventure, and romance, and a guy, who does...guy things. We'll see...
Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I'm lucky, because the social-networking component of promotion -- being chatty and informal and relatable and (I hope) funny -- comes pretty naturally to me. I have writer friends who feel like they're having their teeth pulled iuf they have to Tweet, or Facebook, and it's rough.

 

I do think there's room for different kinds of writers, but maybe less room for the Salinger-y inclined. These days, your publisher expects you to have a website, and a blog, to be on Facebook and Twitter, to interact with readers as well as you can, in part because you can't count on big newspaper reviews to tell the world about your book, in part because the budget to send first-time writers on big book tours is shrinking...there's lots of reasons why smart social networking makes sense. It's just not easy for everyone.

Reader 2
macyboston
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-21-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Have you ever Googled yourself....or looked yourself up on Wikipedia? Does it sort of make you feel like a celebrity?

New User
KristenClaire
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-21-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Well in that case...can't wait to finish reading it. I pace myself when reading so I can enjoy it longer. Although, I brought Certain Girls on a cruise with me last year and finished it in less than two days. Had to hole up in my cabin for several hours after finishing due to my overwhelming emotional reaction. Husband was not sure what to do about that.
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24


Jennifer-Weiner wrote:

I'm lucky, because the social-networking component of promotion -- being chatty and informal and relatable and (I hope) funny -- comes pretty naturally to me. I have writer friends who feel like they're having their teeth pulled iuf they have to Tweet, or Facebook, and it's rough.

 

I do think there's room for different kinds of writers, but maybe less room for the Salinger-y inclined. These days, your publisher expects you to have a website, and a blog, to be on Facebook and Twitter, to interact with readers as well as you can, in part because you can't count on big newspaper reviews to tell the world about your book, in part because the budget to send first-time writers on big book tours is shrinking...there's lots of reasons why smart social networking makes sense. It's just not easy for everyone.


Exactly; it's not easy for everyone. For authors who have to work harder at being chatty, or who are very sensitive, social-media sites can be a minefield. 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Reader 2
macyboston
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-21-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Do you think we'll ever reach a time where authors of "Chic Lit" will have to stop defending their genre? That others will come to terms with the idea that it isn't just idle fluff on the shelves and it does generate a tremendous amount of revenue for publishing houses. (so obviously people enjoy reading it!)
Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I haven't Googled myself in years (Lord, that sounds dirty).

 

Like many writers, I have a singular ability to ignore every nice thing ever said about me and focus exclusively and obsessively on the not-nice stuff (I can't even read Gawker anymore, because one of the commentators said I wasn't pretty!) so I stay away from Google and the like.

Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

"Minefield" doesn't begin to describe it.

 

I wonder, too, whether it's a generational thing, whether people who've come of age with teh Interwebs are just naturally more inclined to Twitter/Tumblr/Facebook.

 

Then again, Robert Olen Butler, he of the email gaffe, is doing a masterful job Tweeting as the Devil. And my writer friend who's the most techno-averse is younger than I am. 

Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I think that, if you look at the history of the novel, women have always had to defend their work and their right to even be represented in the marketplace, against critics who automatically assume that anything to do with women's lives, women's choices, women's issues has no value.

 

So no, I don't think the chick lit wars are ending...except the good stuff continues to sell so well that maybe we can say that the war is over and the chicks won.

 

BTW, I'm turning 40 next year. How long, exactly, do I get to work this "chick" thing?

Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Macyboston, an excellent question. Jen, how do YOU define "chick lit?" I hope I'm not asking you something that you've had to take on too many times in the past..
_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Reader 2
macyboston
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-21-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Have you ever considered collaborating on a novel with another best selling author? Who would you pick, if anyone?
Blogger
LisaSteinke
Posts: 369
Registered: ‎07-20-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I agree, FB and Twitter are not for everyone.  But for new authors(like Liz and I), it has proved vital to get the word out. And for authors like you, Jennifer, I think it makes your fans love you even more!  You rock a mean tweet, girl!

 

Lisa

www.chicklitisnotdead.com
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24


Jennifer-Weiner wrote:

I think that, if you look at the history of the novel, women have always had to defend their work and their right to even be represented in the marketplace, against critics who automatically assume that anything to do with women's lives, women's choices, women's issues has no value.

 

So no, I don't think the chick lit wars are ending...except the good stuff continues to sell so well that maybe we can say that the war is over and the chicks won.

 

BTW, I'm turning 40 next year. How long, exactly, do I get to work this "chick" thing?


HAHA on working this "chick" thing. Trying to think of examples of women authors who have put "chick lit" blinders on, and those who have broken out...I can think of a few, but I might start a new online war! 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I have sort of a Supreme Court-ish definition of "chick lit" -- I know it when I see it.

 

To me, it's sort of the smart-funny-relatable protagonist, and the voice of the thing -- light, wry, smart-ass-y. 

 

But it's interesting to look at the writers I grew up reading and wonder how they'd be characterized, and reviewed, and packaged if they were writing today. Would Susan Isaacs, the queen of smart, commercial women's fiction, get pink covers and no reviews? Would Nora Ephron's essays be sold like Jen Lancaster's? What about FEAR OF FLYING?

Author
Jennifer-Weiner
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

I actually get so star-struck and tongue-tied around the authors I love that I would never be able to collaborate. Because you have to talk to do that, right?
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24


Jennifer-Weiner wrote:

I have sort of a Supreme Court-ish definition of "chick lit" -- I know it when I see it.

 

To me, it's sort of the smart-funny-relatable protagonist, and the voice of the thing -- light, wry, smart-ass-y. 

 

But it's interesting to look at the writers I grew up reading and wonder how they'd be characterized, and reviewed, and packaged if they were writing today. Would Susan Isaacs, the queen of smart, commercial women's fiction, get pink covers and no reviews? Would Nora Ephron's essays be sold like Jen Lancaster's? What about FEAR OF FLYING?


Very, very interesting. I agree on the protagonist; even when the main character is a bit of a bubblehead, like Becky Bloomwood, she has to have a certain integrity -- an EMMA-ish self-possessed air. Speaking of EMMA, I would hate to see Jane Austen's novels published with silly pink covers/get no reviews...but I also think her novels exemplify what can make the best chick lit truly wonderful.
Imagine what a modern marketing department might do with GONE WITH THE WIND! ::smileyfrustrated:hudder:: 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24


Jennifer-Weiner wrote:
I actually get so star-struck and tongue-tied around the authors I love that I would never be able to collaborate. Because you have to talk to do that, right?
Well, these days you might be able to work around the talking part...by using social media! :smileywink:
 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
New User
bookchickdi
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎06-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24

Jennifer,

 

I am 40+ and my Twitter name is bookchickdi, so feel free to ride that 'chick' designation longer. The only problem with it is that I found strange people 'following' me on Twitter because of the 'chick' in my name. Had to block several unsavory characters,mostly having to do with strippers. My advice to people choosing Twitter names is think very carefully about your name! (I also had gamblers following me because of the 'book'- whoda thought?) 

Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Jennifer Weiner, July 20-24


bookchickdi wrote:

Jennifer,

 

I am 40+ and my Twitter name is bookchickdi, so feel free to ride that 'chick' designation longer. The only problem with it is that I found strange people 'following' me on Twitter because of the 'chick' in my name. Had to block several unsavory characters,mostly having to do with strippers. My advice to people choosing Twitter names is think very carefully about your name! (I also had gamblers following me because of the 'book'- whoda thought?) 


Hello bookchickdi! Fortunately, I haven't had too many gamblers following me on Twitter, but that is definitely a good warning.
Do you agree with Jennifer Weiner that chick lit is something you know when you see it? 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________