Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008

Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

[ Edited ]

Let's give Spencer Quinn, the author of Dog On It, a big Center Stage welcome this week. 

 

Pseudonymous author Spencer Quinn zoomed to bestsellerdom with his wry, entertaining Chet and Bernie series, featuring one of the most delightful sleuthing duos in mystery history — an intrepid K-9 police academy dropout and his hapless private detective owner. An Agatha Award-winning writer, Quinn lives on Cape Cod.

Message Edited by Bethanne on 05-11-2009 03:11 PM
_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Distinguished Correspondent
biljounc63
Posts: 189
Registered: ‎11-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I read Dog On It last March and just wanted to say that I really enjoyed the book more than this post will show. I tell everybody that I see how great the book is. I found myself smiling and laughing every time I had the book in my hands.  I even found myself chuckling to myself as if I even thought about the book.The funny thing is I'm not even a dog person! As I read about Bernie I thought yup that is just how I imagine what goes on in a dogs brain.  

 

"Hey whats that noise then I realised it was me... laughing while reading Dog On It.

 

I can't wait until the next one comes out. When can we expect to see it? 

Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
~ Joseph Addison ~

"Reading lets you visit the world of another"
Inspired Correspondent
tabcat
Posts: 100
Registered: ‎09-17-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I have been telling everyone how much I enjoyed Dog On It.  With the fast paced investigation and Chet's hilarious commentary I had a hard time putting it down.   I'm really happy to know that you have more Chet and Bernie books planned!  

 

Teresa

 

 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

[ Edited ]

Mr. Quinn, it is a pleasure to welcome you to Center Stage! I absolutely loved your book and recommend it to all my friends.  Ther book is warm and funny with a mysterious twist. It kept me turning pages. You have a wonderful way of letting us see the world from a dog's perspective.  One of my favorite scenes is the one where Chet sees the cheeto, tries to listen to the conversation but can't take his eyes off the food, then sneaks it before he leaves the room. He didn't care about a little dust. He is so real and life-like, and I appreciate that. How did you gain his perspective?

I look forward to more adventures of Chet and Bernie.  :smileywink:

 

Message Edited by DSaff on 05-10-2009 10:12 PM
DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Many thanks! I'm so glad you enjoyed the book. How I did Chet's perspective? You'd think I'd have a good answer to that question. I did know from the beginning that I wasn't interested in 


DSaff wrote:

Mr. Quinn, it is a pleasure to welcome you to Center Stage! I absolutely loved your book and recommend it to all my friends.  Ther book is warm and funny with a mysterious twist. It kept me turning pages. You have a wonderful way of letting us see the world from a dog's perspective.  One of my favorite scenes is the one where Chet sees the cheeto, tries to listen to the conversation but can't take his eyes off the food, then sneaks it before he leaves the room. He didn't care about a little dust. He is so real and life-like, and I appreciate that. How did you gain his perspective?

I look forward to more adventures of Chet and Bernie.  :smileywink:

 

Message Edited by DSaff on 05-10-2009 10:12 PM

 

an anthropomorphic kind of dog. After that, I guess it's some combination of having had lots of dogs and having observed them, mixed with something in the writing imagination. But the truth is I don't do a lot of planning and outlining. I just sat down one day and started writing - and there was Chet's voice! As you might guess, he's a lot of fun to write. I never anticipated he'd have this raconteur side - does he actually seem to be enjoying the act of telling the story?

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Yes, he absolutely seems to enjoy telling the story. In fact, it seems very natural for him to think of himself as the story teller. He comes across as a thinking, reasoning partner. Now, I will tell you that his take on the pound was something else. I was choked up reading about the other dogs and what he thought about when they disappeared. Then, to read about the process of preparing for the procedure from his point of view made me want to run in and save him, and all the other dogs for that matter. He has won my heart. Boy, he can tell a story!  :smileywink:


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

Many thanks! I'm so glad you enjoyed the book. How I did Chet's perspective? You'd think I'd have a good answer to that question. I did know from the beginning that I wasn't interested in 


an anthropomorphic kind of dog. After that, I guess it's some combination of having had lots of dogs and having observed them, mixed with something in the writing imagination. But the truth is I don't do a lot of planning and outlining. I just sat down one day and started writing - and there was Chet's voice! As you might guess, he's a lot of fun to write. I never anticipated he'd have this raconteur side - does he actually seem to be enjoying the act of telling the story?

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

It's really nice to hear that non-dog people are liking Dog On It, too. The book's a detective story as well, of course, in the long tradition of buddy P.I.'s, going back at least to Holmes and Watson. The next in the series, Thereby Hangs A Tail, comes out in January. There was a brief excerpt from it at chetthedog.com a little while back.

biljounc63 wrote:

I read Dog On It last March and just wanted to say that I really enjoyed the book more than this post will show. I tell everybody that I see how great the book is. I found myself smiling and laughing every time I had the book in my hands.  I even found myself chuckling to myself as if I even thought about the book.The funny thing is I'm not even a dog person! As I read about Bernie I thought yup that is just how I imagine what goes on in a dogs brain.  

 

"Hey whats that noise then I realised it was me... laughing while reading Dog On It.

 

I can't wait until the next one comes out. When can we expect to see it? 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

To start what a great book. It was hard to put down, but I did need to have breakfast with my son and fiance on Sunday for Mothers Day.

I can be very picky on books with dogs as a major character. So I wasn't sure about getting the book. It was highly recommended and had such good reviews that I decided to buy it and see what I thought. I am so glad I did. I am looking forward to the next book, I will be at Barnes and Noble that day to pick it up. Chet added just the right touch to the book.

Thank you, it was a delight to read.

 

pen21

Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


pen21 wrote:

To start what a great book. It was hard to put down, but I did need to have breakfast with my son and fiance on Sunday for Mothers Day.

I can be very picky on books with dogs as a major character. So I wasn't sure about getting the book. It was highly recommended and had such good reviews that I decided to buy it and see what I thought. I am so glad I did. I am looking forward to the next book, I will be at Barnes and Noble that day to pick it up. Chet added just the right touch to the book.

Thank you, it was a delight to read.

 

pen21


Speaking of mothers, there's a bit more about Chet's early days (and Bernie's) in book 2. 

 

Distinguished Correspondent
biljounc63
Posts: 189
Registered: ‎11-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

The Cheeto scene was my favorite as well!!
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
~ Joseph Addison ~

"Reading lets you visit the world of another"
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Here's something I've been wondering about: Did anyone notice that Dog On It is a kind of noirish mystery and yet nobody dies in it? Any thoughts about that, pro, con, other? 

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I actually liked that no one died in the book. We were able to see them "get theirs" so to speak without all the gore and guts. I hadn't realized that point until now. Thank you.  :smileywink: 


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

Here's something I've been wondering about: Did anyone notice that Dog On It is a kind of noirish mystery and yet nobody dies in it? Any thoughts about that, pro, con, other? 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Of course I'm not promising that death-absence will be a feature of every book in the series. But gratuitous sex and violence don't interest me that much. Doesn't it seem a little too easy at times? I'm not talking about anything necessary to the story - can't pull punches there. As for gratuitous eating i

DSaff wrote:

I actually liked that no one died in the book. We were able to see them "get theirs" so to speak without all the gore and guts. I hadn't realized that point until now. Thank you.  :smileywink: 


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

Here's something I've been wondering about: Did anyone notice that Dog On It is a kind of noirish mystery and yet nobody dies in it? Any thoughts about that, pro, con, other? 


 

 


 

n the series, well ... that's up to Chet. 
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
Of course I'm not promising that death-absence will be a feature of every book in the series. But gratuitous sex and violence don't interest me that much. Doesn't it seem a little too easy at times? I'm not talking about anything necessary to the story - can't pull punches there. As for gratuitous eating i

DSaff wrote:

I actually liked that no one died in the book. We were able to see them "get theirs" so to speak without all the gore and guts. I hadn't realized that point until now. Thank you.  :smileywink: 


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

Here's something I've been wondering about: Did anyone notice that Dog On It is a kind of noirish mystery and yet nobody dies in it? Any thoughts about that, pro, con, other? 


 

 


 

n the series, well ... that's up to Chet. 

I don't think the murder is needed in a mystery. The anticipation of what could happen leads to a better read for me. The elements of a detective (human or dog) with a problem to solve is good enough for me.

pen21

Scribe
DSaff
Posts: 2,048
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I love Chet's gratuitous eating - we never know what he will find. <grin> I also love the way he judges people by the food around them. (i.e. Suzie and the dog bisquits, bikers and the campfire). It makes me look at my dog differently and look for places where food could drop and hide. :smileyvery-happy:


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
  As for gratuitous eating in the series, well ... that's up to Chet. 

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
New User
jerzegurl
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-11-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

 

 That is what I like about Dog On It. No gory scenes... and lots of humor... and mystery.  I love the way you bring Chet's voice to life.  I also love the setting the South West.. the desert is magical.      Did you spend a lot of time in the South West?   And what kind of dog do you have now?  

Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I've spent some time in the Southwest, not a lot, but I agree with you about the magical part. It rubbed off on me right away. Does anyone else find that about some places? They touch you in a way that's hard to describe but in me at least it affects the part where the writing comes from.

 

Audrey is the dog around here these days, a beloved golden retriever/Bernese mix. I'm still waiting to see any retriever behavior. She's been invited to book signings but the truth is she's much better outdoors than in. She's big and strong, with an amazingly powerful tail wag. 


jerzegurl wrote:

 

 That is what I like about Dog On It. No gory scenes... and lots of humor... and mystery.  I love the way you bring Chet's voice to life.  I also love the setting the South West.. the desert is magical.      Did you spend a lot of time in the South West?   And what kind of dog do you have now?  


 

 

New User
jerzegurl
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎05-11-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

The Soutwest is in my WIP Winslow Arizona in fact.. I've been fortunate enough drive across and back country 3 times. One time it was the northern route and we saw tons of wild horse running free.  It was one of the most beautiful images I retain in my mind.  It's on my dump list to see one more time.     I also feel that way towards the ocean, especially the Maine Coastline and Sienna Italy.     I had a collie mix once and her tail wagged so, that everything that wasn't nailed to the coffee table went flying.   We have 4-5 pugs... four because they are ours and usually we have a foster pug.. Had one adopted on Tuesday, and received another pug on Saturday...  I LOVE DOGS. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I really like how Chet is easily distracted, especially for food. That is a trait all of my dogs have had. I know I talk with or to my dogs all the time. Do you talk with your dog like Bernie does?

pen21

Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I do talk to my dog. Most of the time it's that interior monologue we've all got going, I assume, much of the time in our heads, and don't usually vocalize. I wonder what percentage of people talk to their dogs. It would be interesting to hear from someone who doesn't. Also - do people talk to their cats (cats are not my area)? What about other animals? I once had tropical fish, never uttered a word to them.

pen21 wrote:

I really like how Chet is easily distracted, especially for food. That is a trait all of my dogs have had. I know I talk with or to my dogs all the time. Do you talk with your dog like Bernie does?

pen21