Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
I do talk to my dog. Most of the time it's that interior monologue we've all got going, I assume, much of the time in our heads, and don't usually vocalize. I wonder what percentage of people talk to their dogs. It would be interesting to hear from someone who doesn't. Also - do people talk to their cats (cats are not my area)? What about other animals? I once had tropical fish, never uttered a word to them.

pen21 wrote:

I really like how Chet is easily distracted, especially for food. That is a trait all of my dogs have had. I know I talk with or to my dogs all the time. Do you talk with your dog like Bernie does?

pen21


 


I did talk with my son's cat when I took care of the cat and their 2 dogs. Considering I also have 2 dogs I felt sorry for Chewie the cat being so outnumbered.

I will admit I try to talk the fish into jumping on my hook when I am fishing. Maybe that is a Minnesota thing.

The communication you have with Bernie and Chet felt very comfortable. They are a good combination, especially for those of us who talk to dogs.

pen21

Inspired Correspondent
tabcat
Posts: 100
Registered: ‎09-17-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15



Spencer_Quinn wrote:
I do talk to my dog. Most of the time it's that interior monologue we've all got going, I assume, much of the time in our heads, and don't usually vocalize. I wonder what percentage of people talk to their dogs. It would be interesting to hear from someone who doesn't. Also - do people talk to their cats (cats are not my area)? What about other animals? I once had tropical fish, never uttered a word to them.

I talk to my cat and my friends' dogs.  The dogs seem to listen better! I had a guinea pig once, but we didn't chat.  

I especially like how throughout the book, Chet developed his own conversational personality with his use of phrases like "don't get me started about that" and "did I mention?".

 

Thanks for asking our opinion of lack of murder and gore.  I have to say that the novel was gritty enough with the bikers and the guys who kidnapped Chet that I stayed on edge.  There was plenty of action with the narrow escapes and the car crash.

 

Love the name of the book and new one coming up! 

 

Teresa

 

Contributor
ROY99
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎12-05-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Hi Spencer,  I'm so glad that I saw that you would be joining in the discussion this week.  I loved Dog On It and was thrilled to find out that it was going to be a series.  I have always been an animal lover and absolutely loved Chet.  I could just see my own dog responding to many of the scenarios (especially the ones involving food) in the same way.   I found myself telling our dog about funny things that Chet did in the book.  Yes, I talk to my dog--our whole family talks to him.  He has been a part of our family for 12 yrs now & we talk to him & out loud too.  Since our only son is gone in the Army now, our dog is the one I spend the most time with during the day.  He even spells.  LOL!  I started spelling words like o-u-t that I knew he would recognize because I knew if I mentioned the word, he would immediately want to go outside.  It didn't take him long to pick up on what my spelled words meant.  He has a special way of talking to us too--can tell by the tone of a particular bark or a particular look what he wants us to know.  The most memorable food he's ever gobbled up was a jalapeno pepper & we thought he would get sick, but he obviously fits in with this family in that he loved it & it didn't hurt him.   I really had not thought about the fact that no one actually died in the book, but then dogs that are trained to take people down (like police dogs) don't usually kill so I did like that aspect.  Of course, if you find it necessary in future books (if it's a really bad guy), then go for it.  I had to laugh when you said you don't talk to your fish because I do.  We have a salt water tank & even though my son told me not to name them or get attached to them, I did.  We don't have any cats (allergies), but  most of my friends with cats do talk to them.  We even talked to the pet snake that my son had for 8 yrs.  My friends laugh with me because I tend to talk to all animals--the birds & squirrels & even the lizards on the patio.  I am looking forward to hearing more about Chet & Bernie's adventures.  
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

It's great that you talk to all these animals. My guess is that humans had much closer relationship with animals in the long-ago past. Now so many humans relate only to other humans and that's that. Is it possible there's something a little claustrophobic about that, in a psychological sense? Constant human/human interaction, especially with so many of us around, seems to whip up a kind of hysteria at times. 

 

Not to pull the book apart, but in terms of technique, did anyone notice how Bernie's thinking-out-loud to Chet both allows us to follow ins and outs of the story, and also see where Bernie's going wrong?  


ROY99 wrote:
Hi Spencer,  I'm so glad that I saw that you would be joining in the discussion this week.  I loved Dog On It and was thrilled to find out that it was going to be a series.  I have always been an animal lover and absolutely loved Chet.  I could just see my own dog responding to many of the scenarios (especially the ones involving food) in the same way.   I found myself telling our dog about funny things that Chet did in the book.  Yes, I talk to my dog--our whole family talks to him.  He has been a part of our family for 12 yrs now & we talk to him & out loud too.  Since our only son is gone in the Army now, our dog is the one I spend the most time with during the day.  He even spells.  LOL!  I started spelling words like o-u-t that I knew he would recognize because I knew if I mentioned the word, he would immediately want to go outside.  It didn't take him long to pick up on what my spelled words meant.  He has a special way of talking to us too--can tell by the tone of a particular bark or a particular look what he wants us to know.  The most memorable food he's ever gobbled up was a jalapeno pepper & we thought he would get sick, but he obviously fits in with this family in that he loved it & it didn't hurt him.   I really had not thought about the fact that no one actually died in the book, but then dogs that are trained to take people down (like police dogs) don't usually kill so I did like that aspect.  Of course, if you find it necessary in future books (if it's a really bad guy), then go for it.  I had to laugh when you said you don't talk to your fish because I do.  We have a salt water tank & even though my son told me not to name them or get attached to them, I did.  We don't have any cats (allergies), but  most of my friends with cats do talk to them.  We even talked to the pet snake that my son had for 8 yrs.  My friends laugh with me because I tend to talk to all animals--the birds & squirrels & even the lizards on the patio.  I am looking forward to hearing more about Chet & Bernie's adventures.  

 

Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Welcome Spencer! So glad you are here this week. 
_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Contributor
the_archivist
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I just saw this discussion.  I am about half way through the book, and I really love it.  Chet is a very interesting dog.  I don't have a dog any longer, mine went to the rainbow bridge a little over a year ago.  I used to talk to her all the time, so I get it when Bernie talks to Chet.  The book is great and I am glad to hear there will be more Chet and Bernie books in the future.
the_archivist
Distinguished Correspondent
biljounc63
Posts: 189
Registered: ‎11-02-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Another of my favorite parts of the book was the barking scene "He barked, I barked, he barked, She barked..." I ROFL when I read that. I could have read pages of that dialogue and it would of kept my interest
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body.
~ Joseph Addison ~

"Reading lets you visit the world of another"
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


tabcat wrote:

I have been telling everyone how much I enjoyed Dog On It.  With the fast paced investigation and Chet's hilarious commentary I had a hard time putting it down.   I'm really happy to know that you have more Chet and Bernie books planned!  

 

Teresa

 

 


Teresa, glad you stopped by and that you read Spencer's book. What did you think was the most fun about Chet's commentary... his dogginess, or his detective skills?
Bethanne 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


DSaff wrote:

Mr. Quinn, it is a pleasure to welcome you to Center Stage! I absolutely loved your book and recommend it to all my friends.  Ther book is warm and funny with a mysterious twist. It kept me turning pages. You have a wonderful way of letting us see the world from a dog's perspective.  One of my favorite scenes is the one where Chet sees the cheeto, tries to listen to the conversation but can't take his eyes off the food, then sneaks it before he leaves the room. He didn't care about a little dust. He is so real and life-like, and I appreciate that. How did you gain his perspective?

I look forward to more adventures of Chet and Bernie.  :smileywink:

 

Message Edited by DSaff on 05-10-2009 10:12 PM

Donna, I loved that scene, too. I'm always delighted to read books that have believable animal perspectives (e.g., The Art of Racing in the Rain). 
Bethanne 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
It's really nice to hear that non-dog people are liking Dog On It, too. The book's a detective story as well, of course, in the long tradition of buddy P.I.'s, going back at least to Holmes and Watson. The next in the series, Thereby Hangs A Tail, comes out in January. There was a brief excerpt from it at chetthedog.com a little while back.

biljounc63 wrote:

I read Dog On It last March and just wanted to say that I really enjoyed the book more than this post will show. I tell everybody that I see how great the book is. I found myself smiling and laughing every time I had the book in my hands.  I even found myself chuckling to myself as if I even thought about the book.The funny thing is I'm not even a dog person! As I read about Bernie I thought yup that is just how I imagine what goes on in a dogs brain.  

 

"Hey whats that noise then I realised it was me... laughing while reading Dog On It.

 

I can't wait until the next one comes out. When can we expect to see it? 


 


Spencer, that is a true mark of excellence, that non-dog people like it, too. Chet is a character in your book, not simply a pet with a speaking voice. Did you work on integrating him in any other ways, aside from his "voice" popping into your head?
Bethanne 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Bethanne wrote:
Welcome Spencer! So glad you are here this week. 
My pleasure, Bethanne. Thanks for all your hard work on this. 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Spencer Quinn wrote 

Not to pull the book apart, but in terms of technique, did anyone notice how Bernie's thinking-out-loud to Chet both allows us to follow ins and outs of the story, and also see where Bernie's going wrong?

 

To reply to the above. At certain times in the book I felt that if only Bernie listened to Chet better the case would have been solved earlier. The thinking-out-loud did help convey the story. But I like how you kept Chet a dog, in that they were certain things he could not get across to Bernie, like what happened when he was tasered. It made it more of a partnership between Bernie and Chet. They both have distractions, especially Chet and food.

pen21

Inspired Correspondent
Bethanne
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
I do talk to my dog. Most of the time it's that interior monologue we've all got going, I assume, much of the time in our heads, and don't usually vocalize. I wonder what percentage of people talk to their dogs. It would be interesting to hear from someone who doesn't. Also - do people talk to their cats (cats are not my area)? What about other animals? I once had tropical fish, never uttered a word to them.

pen21 wrote:

I really like how Chet is easily distracted, especially for food. That is a trait all of my dogs have had. I know I talk with or to my dogs all the time. Do you talk with your dog like Bernie does?

pen21


 


I wish I could say I don't talk to my dogs, because I often sound very dumb when I do! I doubt that their "responses" are as silly in canine language as mine are in humanspeak.
Bethanne 

 

_______________________________________________________

Check out this week's Center Stage discussion!

See all upcoming discussions!

_______________________________________________________
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Bethanne - on the voice question (way way down at the bottom now) - I think one of the keys is that Chet is not a talking dog. He's not a human in dog costume. He's dog all the way. But that doesn't mean he can't narrate. Don't we believe that dogs have some sort of narrative going on in their minds, just as we do - a sort of narrative of their lives? As for integrating him in the story - first, he considers himself a full partner in the agency, and second he loves the work. He ended up integrating himself into the story. 
 

Bethanne wrote:

Spencer_Quinn wrote:
It's really nice to hear that non-dog people are liking Dog On It, too. The book's a detective story as well, of course, in the long tradition of buddy P.I.'s, going back at least to Holmes and Watson. The next in the series, Thereby Hangs A Tail, comes out in January. There was a brief excerpt from it at chetthedog.com a little while back.

biljounc63 wrote:

I read Dog On It last March and just wanted to say that I really enjoyed the book more than this post will show. I tell everybody that I see how great the book is. I found myself smiling and laughing every time I had the book in my hands.  I even found myself chuckling to myself as if I even thought about the book.The funny thing is I'm not even a dog person! As I read about Bernie I thought yup that is just how I imagine what goes on in a dogs brain.  

 

"Hey whats that noise then I realised it was me... laughing while reading Dog On It.

 

I can't wait until the next one comes out. When can we expect to see it? 


 


Spencer, that is a true mark of excellence, that non-dog people like it, too. Chet is a character in your book, not simply a pet with a speaking voice. Did you work on integrating him in any other ways, aside from his "voice" popping into your head?
Bethanne 

 


 

New User
Dianasr7
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-12-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Dear Spencer Quinn - I really enjoyed Dog on It.  As a matter of fact, I read it twice just to savor it again!  I have lent it to a friend who I hope will read it soon because I may need to re-read it again.  I have not had so much fun with a new book since The 13 Clocks.  & the artwork on the covers is fantastic.  I especially liked the description of getting high while sticking one's head out the window of a moving car -- all the smells!  & also the way that Chet keeps labelling one food experience after another as "the best".  It reminds me a bit of Louie the Lab retriever (in a comic strip) and his fascination with the grill.  I also have wonderful dogs -- one went turkey hunting and brought back a turkey egg, and a remarkable cat who is smarter than us most of the time.  I look forward to your next adventure and a little more explanation about Chet's leaping ability and how he flunked out of K-9 school.

Best wishes!  Dianasr7

New User
rosey_d
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-12-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Spencer - regarding your question about whether cat people talk to their cats - We do! :smileyhappy:  I just noticed your book on the reading list for this week, and after reading the many great comments here, I'm going to order it. 

 

I'm a dog person, who doesn't have a schedule that will allow dogs in my life - hence the cats (5 of them).  Cats have very different personalities, they can't be walked. Yes, I've tried with a harness/leash and the cats are more dragged than walked if you try to go at a human pace - meaning that you don't get very far, nor does it equate to good exercise when you make it one block at their pace of smelling every leaf, or bit of dirt, or as they crouch in a semblance of I'm hiding on this sidewalk, because I'm lower to the ground hence those scary cars driving by won't notice me.  Cats ignore you when you want ask them to do tricks.  They do love to play, but have shorter attention spans than most dogs do.  I have one cat, Papi, who plays fetch with her toy mice.  But she runs after it 5 - 10 times and then she plops down on the floor, suddenly bored. Papi is a fatty though. Running across the room a few times makes her pant (almost in dog fashion).  

 

All cats are unique - just as people are.  I've tried to classify their behavior, to label Alpha and Omega - but it's not as easy with cats as dogs.  There seems to be a lot of grey shades between.

 

 

New User
pennybrite52
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-12-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I have not enjoyed a lighthearted book in forever. Chet is your typical dog. I saw so much of my dog in him. Thank you for bringing Chet to life. I can't wait until Bernie and Chet's next adventure..... I hope it is soon!!!!
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Many thanks. There is more about the K-9 story in Thereby Hangs A Tail. Also more about Bernie's military background (that happens when Chet inadvertantly enters a weapons testing center, but that's a story for another time). 

Dianasr7 wrote:

Dear Spencer Quinn - I really enjoyed Dog on It.  As a matter of fact, I read it twice just to savor it again!  I have lent it to a friend who I hope will read it soon because I may need to re-read it again.  I have not had so much fun with a new book since The 13 Clocks.  & the artwork on the covers is fantastic.  I especially liked the description of getting high while sticking one's head out the window of a moving car -- all the smells!  & also the way that Chet keeps labelling one food experience after another as "the best".  It reminds me a bit of Louie the Lab retriever (in a comic strip) and his fascination with the grill.  I also have wonderful dogs -- one went turkey hunting and brought back a turkey egg, and a remarkable cat who is smarter than us most of the time.  I look forward to your next adventure and a little more explanation about Chet's leaping ability and how he flunked out of K-9 school.

Best wishes!  Dianasr7


 

New User
Mel09
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-12-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Mr.. Quinn, Dog On It, was fantastic!  My book club chose it for our March read and everyone loved it.  I can't wait for your next book.  I've also recommended to our sister club in England.  Thanks again. Mel :smileyvery-happy:
Author
Spencer_Quinn
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-09-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Sister club in England - that sounds great. Not every culture has the same relationship toward dogs. I wonder why. (People everywhere seem to like mysterties, of course. One thing about Dog On It - it's not a cozy, actually is much closer to the noir tradition.) 

Mel09 wrote:
Mr.. Quinn, Dog On It, was fantastic!  My book club chose it for our March read and everyone loved it.  I can't wait for your next book.  I've also recommended to our sister club in England.  Thanks again. Mel :smileyvery-happy: