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DSaff
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Chet is a comfortable companion and a good listener. I enjoyed times Bernie is thinking out loud. While Bernie doesn't seem to know that Chet understands, we get to see that he gets it. Sometimes it is easier to problem-solve when we say it out loud. You gave us a lot of information during these "thinking out loud" sessions, and I hope that continues in the next book! We talk with our dog, Oscar. He tries to chat back with us, sometimes mimicking the tones of our words. Oscar is a daschund/basenji mix and a lot of fun.


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

It's great that you talk to all these animals. My guess is that humans had much closer relationship with animals in the long-ago past. Now so many humans relate only to other humans and that's that. Is it possible there's something a little claustrophobic about that, in a psychological sense? Constant human/human interaction, especially with so many of us around, seems to whip up a kind of hysteria at times. 

 

Not to pull the book apart, but in terms of technique, did anyone notice how Bernie's thinking-out-loud to Chet both allows us to follow ins and outs of the story, and also see where Bernie's going wrong?  



 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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DSaff
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

That was a great scene, wasn't it? There are many of them in the book.


biljounc63 wrote:
Another of my favorite parts of the book was the barking scene "He barked, I barked, he barked, She barked..." I ROFL when I read that. I could have read pages of that dialogue and it would of kept my interest

 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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DSaff
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Bethanne, that is another great book! I love reading from the animal's perspective. It gives more meaning to their looks, sounds, and actions.


Bethanne wrote:

Donna, I loved that scene, too. I'm always delighted to read books that have believable animal perspectives (e.g., The Art of Racing in the Rain). 
Bethanne 

 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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nlsamson
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I absolutley loved this book, from the beginning until the end.  I find , now that I'm finished, I am missing Chet and Bernie. 

I have a 3 year old beagle, and I kept thinking that it could very well be her thoughts on more than one occasion (especially relating to food! )

I also enjoyed the way Chet would start on something and then tell the reader he would get back to that if there was time.  I can't wait for him to finish telling us his history as well as Chets.

I agree with DSaff, the part about the pound really had the reader wanting to rescue all the dogs.  I was reading that on a flight to New Orleans, even though I knew this was the first in a series, so chances were very good that Bernie would be okay, I still felt my heart pounding, and my eyes start to fill with tears.  Someone had to get there, something had to happen!  

 

Thank you so much.  I've never been a mystery reader, but you have me hooked now.  (at least on Chet and Bernie)   :smileywink:

"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away" - unknown
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Spencer_Quinn
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


nlsamson wrote:

I absolutley loved this book, from the beginning until the end.  I find , now that I'm finished, I am missing Chet and Bernie. 

I have a 3 year old beagle, and I kept thinking that it could very well be her thoughts on more than one occasion (especially relating to food! )

I also enjoyed the way Chet would start on something and then tell the reader he would get back to that if there was time.  I can't wait for him to finish telling us his history as well as Chets.

I agree with DSaff, the part about the pound really had the reader wanting to rescue all the dogs.  I was reading that on a flight to New Orleans, even though I knew this was the first in a series, so chances were very good that Bernie would be okay, I still felt my heart pounding, and my eyes start to fill with tears.  Someone had to get there, something had to happen!  

 

Thank you so much.  I've never been a mystery reader, but you have me hooked now.  (at least on Chet and Bernie)   :smileywink:

 

Glad to have pulled in a non-mystery reader. What is it about mysteries that some readers don't like? 


 

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Thayer
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Mr. Quinn,

 

I purchased your book on the recommendations of MANY readers while participating in the B&N First Look book club. While mysteries are not my usual genre of choice, I found that I enjoyed your book immensely and couldn't put it down. While the story raptly held my attention, there was so much frivolity and humor to the story that is so inherantly...canine.

 

 I particularly like when Chet gets "caught" in behaviors that he doesn't realize he is committing..such as barking intensely, whining, jumping up, etc.  I also find it entertaining when Chet gives us little teasers as to "previous" events that could (hopefully) turn up in future adventures, like the story of his police dog training. It was truly a delight and I cannot wait to read the next in the series.

 

Couple of questions...what's up with the "lump" the groomer found on his back and will Chet finally meet the dog responsible for the "she-bark?" Can't wait for the next installment.

~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.
LCE
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LCE
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I too really enjoyed your book.  I loved Chet's narration and Bernie's thinking out loud.  I would like to know more about Iggy, Chet's lump and the she barker.  Every time you mentioned Iggy I had to smile.  I could picture him waiting by his window to check on Chet.  I can't wait to read the next book and hopefully find answers to some of my questions.  Thanks for writing a such a great book. 
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


LCE wrote:
I too really enjoyed your book.  I loved Chet's narration and Bernie's thinking out loud.  I would like to know more about Iggy, Chet's lump and the she barker.  Every time you mentioned Iggy I had to smile.  I could picture him waiting by his window to check on Chet.  I can't wait to read the next book and hopefully find answers to some of my questions.  Thanks for writing a such a great book. 
As for the lump, Iggy, and she-barker: please stay tuned. It's a series, after all. But I'm pretty sure there's already more about Iggy at chetthedog.com.

 

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DSaff
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Spencer, I think that some people find many mysteries to be very predictable, while others don't seem to enjoy the fun of unraveling the clues. Maybe they never figured out how to unravel them. Bernie and Chet may help pull more of them in because of the pure fun of your book. My parents are avid readers and gave us books as gifts all the time. But my grandmother really got me into mysteries with Agatha Christie. It helps when adults share a love of books with children - different genres and authors.


Spencer_Quinn wrote:


Glad to have pulled in a non-mystery reader. What is it about mysteries that some readers don't like? 


 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

 
 

DSaff wrote:

Spencer, I think that some people find many mysteries to be very predictable, while others don't seem to enjoy the fun of unraveling the clues. Maybe they never figured out how to unravel them. Bernie and Chet may help pull more of them in because of the pure fun of your book. My parents are avid readers and gave us books as gifts all the time. But my grandmother really got me into mysteries with Agatha Christie. It helps when adults share a love of books with children - different genres and authors.


Spencer_Quinn wrote:


Glad to have pulled in a non-mystery reader. What is it about mysteries that some readers don't like? 

 

 

And speaking of grandmothers, mine always brought a Hardy Boys book when she came to visit. Anybody remember the Hardy Boys?  


 


 

 


 

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DSaff
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Absolutely! I remember "The Hardy Boys" and "Nancy Drew." ahhhhh, memories


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
 
 

DSaff wrote:

Spencer, I think that some people find many mysteries to be very predictable, while others don't seem to enjoy the fun of unraveling the clues. Maybe they never figured out how to unravel them. Bernie and Chet may help pull more of them in because of the pure fun of your book. My parents are avid readers and gave us books as gifts all the time. But my grandmother really got me into mysteries with Agatha Christie. It helps when adults share a love of books with children - different genres and authors.


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

 

And speaking of grandmothers, mine always brought a Hardy Boys book when she came to visit. Anybody remember the Hardy Boys?  



 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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Bethanne
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Spencer_Quinn wrote:
Sister club in England - that sounds great. Not every culture has the same relationship toward dogs. I wonder why. (People everywhere seem to like mysterties, of course. One thing about Dog On It - it's not a cozy, actually is much closer to the noir tradition.) 

Mel09 wrote:
Mr.. Quinn, Dog On It, was fantastic!  My book club chose it for our March read and everyone loved it.  I can't wait for your next book.  I've also recommended to our sister club in England.  Thanks again. Mel :smileyvery-happy:

 


Spencer, I'm glad you highlighted that distinction -- while regular mystery readers would probably be aware that you aren't a "cozy" author, others might not be.
Bethanne 

 

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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Bethanne wrote:

Spencer_Quinn wrote:
Sister club in England - that sounds great. Not every culture has the same relationship toward dogs. I wonder why. (People everywhere seem to like mysterties, of course. One thing about Dog On It - it's not a cozy, actually is much closer to the noir tradition.) 

Mel09 wrote:
Mr.. Quinn, Dog On It, was fantastic!  My book club chose it for our March read and everyone loved it.  I can't wait for your next book.  I've also recommended to our sister club in England.  Thanks again. Mel :smileyvery-happy:

 


Spencer, I'm glad you highlighted that distinction -- while regular mystery readers would probably be aware that you aren't a "cozy" author, others might not be.
Bethanne 

 



Bethanne wrote:

Spencer_Quinn wrote:
Sister club in England - that sounds great. Not every culture has the same relationship toward dogs. I wonder why. (People everywhere seem to like mysterties, of course. One thing about Dog On It - it's not a cozy, actually is much closer to the noir tradition.) 

Mel09 wrote:
Mr.. Quinn, Dog On It, was fantastic!  My book club chose it for our March read and everyone loved it.  I can't wait for your next book.  I've also recommended to our sister club in England.  Thanks again. Mel :smileyvery-happy:

 


Spencer, I'm glad you highlighted that distinction -- while regular mystery readers would probably be aware that you aren't a "cozy" author, others might not be.
Bethanne 

 


Thanks, Bethanne. Bernie certainly comes out of the noir tradition - the lone guy with problems, validating his existence by trying to make some sort of justice happen. But there's one big difference - at least I hope it's big - he's got Chet! The noir tradition tends to be pessimistic, don't you think? And do we all agree that Chet's an optimist? 

 

 

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Violet_Adler
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

I think dogs are optimistic in their nature. And Chet is definitely one example of that! I was wondering, is it difficult to write in Chet's 'voice' at times? And do you have the third book in the series ready, for those of us who are already eagerly awaiting Thereby Hangs a Tail?
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Violet_Adler wrote:
I think dogs are optimistic in their nature. And Chet is definitely one example of that! I was wondering, is it difficult to write in Chet's 'voice' at times? And do you have the third book in the series ready, for those of us who are already eagerly awaiting Thereby Hangs a Tail?
No, Violet, don't have the third book ready. I plan to start writing it this summer, with the hope it will be finished around the time Thereby Hangs A Tail comes out. Excellent question on Chet's voice. I confess I never seem to have difficulty slipping into it. This must reveal something about my take on life - I hope nothing bad.  

 

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DSaff
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Chet is definitely an optimist. He can do things, he can help make them happen. Even while in the pound, Chet was an optimist. It wasn't until he started to put it all together that we saw some real fear that he might not get out of the situation. 


Spencer_Quinn wrote:

Thanks, Bethanne. Bernie certainly comes out of the noir tradition - the lone guy with problems, validating his existence by trying to make some sort of justice happen. But there's one big difference - at least I hope it's big - he's got Chet! The noir tradition tends to be pessimistic, don't you think? And do we all agree that Chet's an optimist?

 


 

 

DonnaS =) " Reading is a means of thinking with another person's mind; it forces you to stretch your own." Charles Scribner
"A book is like a garden carried in the pocket." Chinese Proverb
My blog: http://bookworm56.blogspot.com
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tabcat
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


Bethanne wrote:

What did you think was the most fun about Chet's commentary... his dogginess, or his detective skills?

Bethanne 

I  definitely enjoyed his dogginess.  Like the others, I loved how Chet could get so distracted by food, but then jump right back into detecting.  I also liked how Specer stayed true to the nature of dogs by not having Chet use Lassie like "powers" to communicate.  Chet knew what he wanted to tell Bernie, but sometimes he couldn't get through to him or Bernie just didn't pick up on it.

I have to repeat that I just loved this book!

Thanks for this forum opportunity.

Teresa

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tabcat
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Spencer_Quinn wrote:

And speaking of grandmothers, mine always brought a Hardy Boys book when she came to visit. Anybody remember the Hardy Boys?  


 


Oh yes, Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, Dana Girls, Cherry Ames, Trixie Belden.....

I was so disappointed when my son did not enjoy the Hardy Boys.

Teresa

 


 


 

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pen21
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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15

Good question. I read Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys. Then my brothers got me hooked on Agatha Christie. So I started spending a lot of time at the library and then the  used book store. Brothers are a good thing.

pen21

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Re: Spencer Quinn, May 11-15


pen21 wrote:

Good question. I read Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys. Then my brothers got me hooked on Agatha Christie. So I started spending a lot of time at the library and then the  used book store. Brothers are a good thing.

pen21


Brothers and sisters, too! I sometimes wonder about all the kids growing up as only children. But that's neither here nor there, has nothing to do with Chet and Bernie. Have I mentioned that Chet has a blog, chetthedog.com? Sometimes it deals with things happening in the world - I believe he reviewed Hotel For Dogs, for example - and had opinions on the Obamas's new dog - but right now he and Bernie are in the middle of a complicated case with its roots in an old silent movie called Greed, a complicated case that advance by 150 words a day or so. Was anyone aware of the blog?