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Reyna
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Registered: ‎09-29-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Hi Cesar. We are all so fortunate to have you. You are an inspiration and a great role model for how humans should interact with animals and with one another - caring and respecting Mother Nature.

My question is about barking. My 2 year old Welsh Terrier male barks only at certain times. When the barking happens, it becomes obsessive like he can't control it. I've tried the "claw" and saying "enough", sometimes it works, most times it doesn't. He barks when we are in the car in the parking lot and he sees another dog outside. He barks when we are entering and exiting his day care when we encounter another dog or men. He is very socialized and plays well in dog parks, dog beach and I'm told he is never alone in day care and has tons of friends. Like most Terriers, he is high energy. He goes to day care 3x a week and gets 3 half hour walks the other 2 days. Weekends are for play - we either go to dog beach, dog park, kayak, run, etc. He is crate trained and obeys all other commands. He has a ton of friends in the neighborhood and is happy to see them when we have walks. He loves to say hi to most dogs and people. But about 10% of the time, when we're walking when he will growl at a dog or a man (never women) during the walk. Any suggestions?
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awakekat
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Registered: ‎09-29-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

After watching 3 episodes in 2006 I have been inspired to become a certified dog trainer who specializes in dog behavior. Since this is a Book Discussion group, my question is about a book.

I recently purchased and am reading a book that I would like to know if Cesar has read, it sounds oddly familiar to the comfortable setting Cesar makes during the interview portions of his show and his interaction with the humans:

It's Not the Dogs, Its the people! A Dog Trainer's Guide to Training Humans - Nicole Wilde

I am half way through the small 132 page paperback book and I find that the book parallels him quite specifically. I find the book on target when it will help me dealing with people (specifically) and their pets. I very highly recommend this book for anyone who will be training people and their dogs either in the home or in a group setting. If others read this post and get their hands on a copy, you will find out what I mean by "the book parallels him quite specifically". It is like he either read the book 100 times or slept with it under his pillow for better osmosis.
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Bernice
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Registered: ‎09-29-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Cesar,
I have the same barking when the doorbell rings problem that Lori in Mankato does, but my dog is a 5-year-old, 40-pound Wheaten. He is affectionate and loving and (according to the several trainers we've had) "does not have an aggressive bone in his body." He is also hyperactive and jumps on people (Wheaten traits, I gather). When someone comes to the door (which is mostly glass)-- to deliver something, visit us, bring the mail, repair something -- he barks nonstop. It's a loud, threatening-sounding bark and frankly, it's scary. We've tried pretty much everything -- getting him to sit (he won't stay), throwing keys near (not at) him, having people ring the bell so we can practice calming him down. It's incredibly stressful -- for me and the people at the door. He gets plenty of exercise -- three walks a day and frequently chasing the squirrels on our fence.

HELP!
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lindaleechapel
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Registered: ‎09-29-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

It seems like most of us have barking problems. My Sheltie barks at birds. If he spots them a block away in the sky, he becomes annoyed. He also has figured out when a dog is being walked by our house and begins to bark. Finally, he participates in the neighborhood "bark and call", that happens one and a while. Any help? Thank you.
Linda
Santa Ana
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Cylee-Y
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Registered: ‎09-29-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

I read your first book and it was very insightfull. Thy psychology you use on the dogs translates to people as well. I have a question that is kind of disgusting but here goes. I have a five year old female Weimaranar and she is a very well behaved dog except for one thing: She eats feces, her own and our other 2 dog's. We have done everyhing we can think of to stop her but the minute we take our eyes off her she starts eating again. What can we do?
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spIDer
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Dear Cesar,

How did your Grandfather's relationship with animals help define your life with dogs?

Best Regards,

Michelle
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Roxanne0506
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Registered: ‎09-30-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

For the first time in my life (and I've had dogs ever since I was a child), a have a pack of all young dogs. First is Macy, a 2 1/2 yr. old shih tzu. When my daughter and grandson had to move after Katrina, they opted to leave their dog with me since their living arrangements were uncertain. Some time after my old dog died last summer, I was in PetSmart and fell in love with Jimmy Buffett, thus named due to his extremly mellow disposition. Buffett is now 1 1/2 and is a poodle/schnauser mix. Last but not least is Belle. She just turned a year old and is a terrier mix. I originally got her for my son in college with the knowledge that if it didn't work out, she'd be mine. She ate his apartment, so I have dog #3! LOL Buffett and Belle are both adopted from the Humane Society.

About 3 or 4 months after I got Buffett, he began displaying aggressive behaviors and it soon became impossible for anyone to come into my home unmolested. Eventually, it escalated to the point that he was nipping people's (mainly men) ankles. Belle continued her chewing habits with my dining room chairs and any handy wood projection that was within easy reach. And all of the dogs occassionally decide my home is their personal toilet, usually when the weather is bad.

Always before I've had an older dog to teach the younger ones how to behave. With this pack of youngsters, I'm at a loss. My biggest concern is Buffett's aggression towards strangers. We live in a rural area, so visitors are a rarity, making it difficult to acclimatize the kids to company. The few who came to visit in the past, won't come over now because of my vengeful boy. I've tried everything I can think of. Can you advise me?
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kmfr29
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎12-29-2006
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan



Jessica wrote:
Do you have a question for Cesar Millan? Reply to this message to start the conversation!

(Just a reminder -- Cesar joins the conversation, starting October 1st.)

Message Edited by Jessica on 09-28-2007 10:09 AM


Hi Cesar! I really am excited to have this opportunity to ask you questions! We have a 2 yr old Golden Retrievier, we have been to puppy clasees, and have also read your previous book. Our problem is "Sunny" barks (mostly at me) at night when we are relaxing, reading or watching tv. If I move into my office, she will stop and lay quietly in the hallway. Suggestions? She also has this crazy habit of "gnawing" exitedly on any object close at hand - constantly! This does not damage whatever it is that she chews on. She did not even chew up things as a puppy! She and I walk on a daily basis and she is good with other dogs. We also have 2 cats that she loves to torment (in a good way!) Any suggestions that you have will be greatly appreciated!

Kris
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marcys233
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Registered: ‎10-01-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

My 7 month old puppy golden retriever still goes to the bathroom in my house (as well as outside). I am not sure if I should be concerned and take him to the vet or if he is a slow learner. Also, my 9 year old Shih Tzu doesn't like him. They bark at each other constantly. Please help! Thank you,
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safischer
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Registered: ‎10-01-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan



Jessica wrote:
Do you have a question for Cesar Millan? Reply to this message to start the conversation!

(Just a reminder -- Cesar joins the conversation, starting October 1st.)

Message Edited by Jessica on 09-28-2007 10:09 AM


I am hoping that you might be able to answer this question easily. i have a 27 month old Old English Sheepdog. The only problem that we have is when she is in the car. Instead of the calm dog sitting in the front or back seat, she is extremely anxious and can not be controlled (even with someone sitting in the back seat with her). We have tried pretty much everything. She doesn't get sick (thankfully), but we just can't take her with us when we would love to have her along. How can we get her to travel better?
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CesarMillan
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Registered: ‎09-11-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Dear Barnes and Noble Book Club Members,

Wow! I am so excited that you are all here, supporting my new book. I thank you very much for all the interest and hope you will not be disappointed in BE THE PACK LEADER.

First of all, I've read all your questions and need to post a caveat - I wouldn't be doing you justice to try and answer your specific questions about dog problems on this written forum. People stop me on the street and in airports and say, "Cesar, my dog has this thing where she won't pee on Tuesdays," or some specific question like that, and I have to answer that I may be "The Dog Whisperer," but unfortunately I am not the dog - or, more importantly - the human psychic.

If you watch the show, you will see how important the one-on-one consultation with the client is for me, to get an idea of the human energy and what the human perceives the problem to be. Equally important for me to help with a problem is to see the energy of the human when he or she interacts with the dog. I take all of these things into consideration when I take on a case.

So I'm sorry that I can't help solve your specific dog problems here.

However, I have noticed some general themes running through all your questions - introducting a new dog to a pack, nervous dogs, fearful dogs, etc. - and will post some generic responses on those themes soon. Perhaps from those answers, you will find some new inspiration or get an idea for a new strategy to work on your own personal problem.

Stay Calm and Assertive!
Cesar


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5280CityGal
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Registered: ‎10-01-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Cesar,
Thanks for helping so many dog owners. I've watched your TV program & have your great book.

I own 2 Havanese: A 5-1/2 year old female Alpha, Maggie, and a 5-year old Alpha-want-a-be male, Paulo. Both are neutered. I am definitely the Leader to Maggie but am amazed that Paulo doesn't seem to see me in the same Leadership role.

The breeder of Maggie warned me that Maggie was a "very" Alpha personality, so I read all I could get my hands on, including "Leader of the Pack." Unfortunately, training fell short when we got Paulo since Maggie was so "hard" on Paulo & trying, but failing, to work with two dogs at once was our downfall.

My biggest concerns are dealing with Paulo's neurotic behaviors, passive-aggessive behavior, and unwillingness to take me seriously as Leader of the Pack.

Maggie rules over him with a fairly "hard hand." Although I've never seen blood, Maggie will "take Paulo down" over his breaking her rule of "I own the barking at the front door rights;" Don't you dare steal my chewy;" and a few other minor things. Thankfully, Maggie does NOT protect her food bowl from Paulo, though.

I try to keep Maggie's leadership role in tact by petting her first, giving her the preferred seat next to me on the sofa, etc. But Paulo seems to resist this arrangement by "getting into trouble (& therefore our attention)" by chewing on one of our shoes in the room, licking & pulling fur from his body until sore/bare, and climbing & stepping on my or my husband's reclined body on the sofa.

I will say that Paulo for the most part is submissive to Maggie. He'll look nervously over his shoulder to see if Maggie is watching, and will then leave the Alpha spot on the sofa to Maggie. (Interestingly, if I'm scolding Maggie for attacking the vacuum cleaner, Paulo will bark AT MAGGIE, as if telling her that she needs to mind me!).

Do you have suggestions on how to become the Leader over Paulo, without making him more neurotic? If I give him a firm "no," over something, or firmly take him off when he tries to step on me, he'll begin to lick or pull his fur out!

Thanks very much.

Linda
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gulfgull
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Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Your philosophy has given me a new best friend, and made me a best friend to my rott/beagle mix named Bosco. I have no real issues with Bosco, but with other dogs. When I visit my daughter, she has a hyper overactive schnorkie (schnauzer/yorkie) with minimal training/supervision, and her roomate has a pit bull which has never received any "training" or been given rules or limitations. When Bosco arrives, they both immediately begin attacking (playfully so far) Bosco. He becomes submissive right away, lays down on his back and allows them to take the reins. He allows them to take his toys (which they promptly destroy), eat his food, etc. I now separate them when I feed him, and after becoming exhausted by continually correcting their frightening advances, I tend to put him in another room (not fair to him). I try to work with both the other dogs, teaching them what I have learned, but have been unable to convince the dogs' owners that their dogs need exercise, rules, limitations, etc., that need to continually be reinforced. I have grown leary of visiting my daughter, and that doesn't make me or her happy. Do I just keep trying to show them, by example, that their dogs and their lives will benefit from spending time working with their "animals?" I guess my question is, how do I change a HUMAN's responsibility level, to understand that their animals are a menace? Your wisdom is appreciated.
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CesarMillan
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

That's a funny question! I am definitely not a "cat whisperer"; cats aren't generally pack animals so they don't have the need to please the leader the way that dogs do. They say that dogs have owners and cats have staff, and I don't think that's such a far off description.

Cat psychology is not my thing, but I do know that cats do engage in social behavior. If you have more than one cat, you will definitely see that they form their own hierarchies and undergo their own power struggles and dominance rituals. If you have a cat that already lives in the house and you adopt a dog, you may very well see a real power struggle - and more often than not, the winner is the cat! I have many clients who could learn a thing or two about leadership from their cats.

Do remember that all animals can read the energy you're projecting, and that includes cats. Every animal understands the calm-assertive energy of a leader. Calm assertive energy won't be able to get your cat to play "fetch" with you, but it will help you to get your cat to take you more seriously. I believe that humans have the responsibility to play a leadership role with all the animals in the house - from the goldfish to the bird to the cat to the dog. After all, when it comes down to it, they are living in our world and are dependent on us, so we owe it to them to step up to the plate.


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riolobo
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan



Jessica wrote:
Do you have a question for Cesar Millan? Reply to this message to start the conversation!

(Just a reminder -- Cesar joins the conversation, starting October 1st.)

Message Edited by Jessica on 09-28-2007 10:09 AM


Hi Cesar,
I just booked my ticket to see your seminar in San Antonio... YEE HAA!
I have two brother wolf-malamutes just over 1 yr old. They've been
neutered. I have used your methods since they were 4 months old with
great sucess. It is harder to raise siblings to live in harmony especially as they mature? They've had one fight between them about 4 months ago... not sure what triggered it. No wounds nor blood
was shed, just alot of screaming inside each other's mouth.
Can't wait to get your book tomorrow.
Thanks, Lisa B
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Tamara_H
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Registered: ‎10-01-2007
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Boxer TKO

Hi,

Any thoughts on how to keep my 13 mo. old female boxer from jumping on the hood of our cars?

Chase isn't putting any dents in them, just lots and lots of scratches. The paint is ruined. She only does it when we're not home. And when we are home she is more interested in us and doesn't really go near the cars.

We've built a fence to keep her out of 1/3 of the garage and off my husband's car. I have been moving my car out of the garage when we leave. It just seems completely ridiculous to be kicked out of the garage because we can't correct her behavior.

Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks,

Tamara
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CesarMillan
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan


awakekat wrote:
After watching 3 episodes in 2006 I have been inspired to become a certified dog trainer who specializes in dog behavior. Since this is a Book Discussion group, my question is about a book.

I recently purchased and am reading a book that I would like to know if Cesar has read, it sounds oddly familiar to the comfortable setting Cesar makes during the interview portions of his show and his interaction with the humans:

It's Not the Dogs, Its the people! A Dog Trainer's Guide to Training Humans - Nicole Wilde

I am half way through the small 132 page paperback book and I find that the book parallels him quite specifically. I find the book on target when it will help me dealing with people (specifically) and their pets. I very highly recommend this book for anyone who will be training people and their dogs either in the home or in a group setting. If others read this post and get their hands on a copy, you will find out what I mean by "the book parallels him quite specifically". It is like he either read the book 100 times or slept with it under his pillow for better osmosis.




This is not a book I have read, although it sounds as if the author is on the same page as I am when it comes to dogs. It's always exciting to come across someone who shares your vision, so I will make sure to include this book in my research as I prepare for my next book, which will be a family guide to choosing, raising and living happily with dogs.

Thank you for the recommendation.


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CesarMillan
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan


CH1 wrote:
We currently are having problems with our 3 year old Cockapoo, CoCo. She recognizes me as the pack leader and basically follows me around and lays at my feet. However, she does not obey my husband or son. Are there specific exercises they can do with her to establish themselves as leaders?



Obviously I cannot be there to observe first hand the energy you and your family share with your dog, but needless to say, it is of the utmost importance. Many families make the well-intentioned mistake of making one person more responsible for the dog than the rest, so the dog ends up taking that person seriously and seeing the other family members as just fellow "followers" in the pack and not taking them seriously.

If you get a chance, watch episode 17 in Season Two of my show. The episode is about a bichon, "Snowflake", who would attack the wife but followed the husband. The problem was in the dynamic between the husband and wife, not the wife and the dog. The husband was communicating to the dog that the wife was number three in the pack.

When we bring dogs into the household, it's important that we establish all humans as pack leaders early on. One possible strategy is to make sure both your husband and son spend alone time with your dog every day, especially walking her. Remember, the walk is the surest, strongest tool we have in creating deep bonds with our dogs.


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shoemichi
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

We have three toy poodles, a 9 year old girl, 4 year old boy and a 6 mth old boy and boy do we have problems. The 6 mth old, named Manolo is the one that I just can't figure out. He is currently in his second round of training classes, he failed the first time and honestly he isn't doing so well this time around. Since he is a toy poodle he is rather small but he doesn't seem to think so. He killed a garden snake, attacks any bug, and I'm not sure but I think he killed a bird. Not good. He is also a chewer, anything the sees is going into his mouth, he has even learned to climb onto the coffee table and walk along the top to take whatever he chooses. The bed, the couch, the book case nothing is safe and honestly I'm worried. We have tried the Bitter Apple and Bitter Yuck spray products, supposedly they stop a dog from chewing, well Manolo thinks it tastes good because he just keeps going. We've tried the spray bottles with cold water... My mother takes a newspaper, magazine, whatever and makes a loud sound to startle him, it lasts for a second and we're right back to square root one. He eats plants and that terrifies me because plants can be very harmful and he just won't stop!! I never physically discipline him but I try and use a firm voice. That is just the tip of the iceberg on what he does but if we had at least stop chewing everything. Also he likes to run out the front door, what do you think of the invisible fence? Please any suggestions help, and you are welcome to come over to my place to help out. :smileyhappy: I'm desperate.
Thanks,
Michelle
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littleweaver
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Questions for Cesar Millan

Dear Cesar,

Thanks so much for doing this book club! I just found out about this particular one and I feel very fortunate to be able to participate.

I do have a question and I am wondering if you might help me. I have a seven year old Schnoodle named Coco which we adopted in April. She is a very well behaved dog and has an amazing relationship with us. I think that we were meant to be with her, because my oldest daughter has had a cancerous brain tumor...it has now been removed, but my daughter continues to have seizures and our dog, with no training, always tells us before they happen. We had just been looking for a pet and we thought that we were "saving" her!

Anyway, we do have one problem. She has always had an issue with housetraining, even though we have tried working with her on this. Her vet hasn't been able to find anything medically wrong with her and thinks that it is because of her background (she was in kennels where the dogs were allowed to go on the floor, so we think that she perhaps lost the natural instinct that dogs have not to do this.) I have many friends who have said that perhaps she does this when she is "mad" at us for not giving her enough attention. We do not punish her; we usually do not "catch her in the act," as she is sneaky and tries to find places (like under the bed) where we will not find it. This is not an issue of having to hold it for too long...my husband works nights and I work days, so there is always someone home. Per your advice (I have all of your books and DVD's!), we walk quite a bit with the dog (about one to two hours each day). Often, she will "tell" us when she has to go by licking us in a certain way, running to the door, and whining...just not when she has to defecate!

I do not personally believe that she is doing this because she is "mad" at us. She is such an empathetic creature and is also quite submissive. I have tried praising her when she does "poop" outside. Do you have any insight as to why she might be doing this?

Of course, she is such a sweet dog, and I would never get rid of a dog for this reason, but I am trying to understand her behavior.

Thanks...all the best!
Mary
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