Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
PeterP
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Introduce Yourselves!

Hi Everyone,

Please take a moment to introduce yourselves to the group. Have you read Tom Jones before, or will this be your first time? Welcome!
Frequent Contributor
CallMeLeo
Posts: 513
Registered: ‎11-08-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Hi, I'm Leonora, now a semi-retired Human Resources Manager with alot of time for my first love - reading. As with most classics I read 'Tom Jones' in my late teens/early-20's, which is to say that reading it again will be like reading it for the first time. :smileyhappy: I really like the pace scheduled here for Fielding's book. It should be a fun ride.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

I'm a formerly and I hope future avid reader struggling with vision issues at the moment which severely limit my reading, but love to discuss classic books. I read Tom Jones perhaps 40 years ago, but retain very little of it. However, TJ is one of the few movies I have seen, and I thought the movie was considerably better than the book.

But I was young when I read it, and it will be fun to visit it as a much older and possibly slightly wiser man.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

[ Edited ]
Tom Jones is a new book to me. Yesterday I started listening to an unabridged reading of it by Charlton Griffin, and I am hooked. I just finished reading Anthony Trollope's Dr. Thorne, to which I am seeing similarities--the intrusive author/narrator, the ironic tone, the child of unfortunate birth. I'm not very far yet, so all that may change. I probably won't be contributing much, because of my current schedule, but I am here.

Message Edited by Laurel on 08-04-2007 05:43 PM
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Hello Peter - I am a retiree from Over the Pond and am pleased to be discussing this brilliant British Classic with you and others! I have read it on several occasions and particularly appreciate its frank humour, so typical of its period. It was perhaps the language of this period (and Chaucer) which D H Lawrence had in mind when he sought to rescue some of it from the gutter and use it in Lady Chatterley's Lover. Is the edition you are using here complete and unabridged?

I rather like Doris Lessing's comment on the book: 'This country [UK] becomes every day more like the eighteenth century, full of thieves and adventurers, rogues and a robust unhypocritical savagery, side by side with people lecturing others on morality.'
Contributor
rdm68
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

I'm Bob. I was supposed to read Tom Jones in high school, but I only skimmed it enough to write the book report. About ten years ago I decided to catch up on all the books I was supposed to have read but didn't, so I finally read TJ and loved it. I was actually glad I was older when I finally got to it. I'm looking forward to reading it again in this group.
Reader
rjpdigiacomo
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-15-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Hello to all! My name is Robert and I have not read Tom Jones. I'm looking forward to the discussions and hope to get a lot out of them. I am especially interested in checking out Fielding's musical references, since I am a musician and I love Baroque music.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

What are our instruments? I play baroque recorder.


rjpdigiacomo wrote:
Hello to all! My name is Robert and I have not read Tom Jones. I'm looking forward to the discussions and hope to get a lot out of them. I am especially interested in checking out Fielding's musical references, since I am a musician and I love Baroque music.


_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Reader
rjpdigiacomo
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-15-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

I am a classically-trained pianist.
Frequent Contributor
PeterP
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

[ Edited ]
Greetings Everyone!

To speak to your question, Choisya, all the editions I mentioned are unabridged. I don't even know, specifically, of any abridged editions, though I'm sure they must exist - but who knows? - there may even be a comic book version! What a world.

That is a wonderful quote from Doris Lessing. When did she write (say) that? Is it recent?

Message Edited by PeterP on 08-07-2007 11:49 AM

Message Edited by PeterP on 08-07-2007 11:50 AM
Contributor
rdm68
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Robert, have you seen the 1963 movie of Tom Jones? The soundtrack is sort of faux-baroque, but it's very funny and really enhances the movie.
Reader
rjpdigiacomo
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎02-15-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Bob, I did see the 1963 film version many years ago. I recall an overall positive feeling about the movie and the music was just as you described it. I seem to remember that it was a faux-baroque with a 60's feel to it, but then the 60's left an indelible impression on everything that was produced at that time.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!



rdm68 wrote:
Robert, have you seen the 1963 movie of Tom Jones? The soundtrack is sort of faux-baroque, but it's very funny and really enhances the movie.

that is one of the very, very, very few movies of classical works which I think was better than the book, though I might not feel so after re-reading the book today. But the eating scene in it was one of the most sexually charged fully clothed scenes ever filmed, not to mention hilarious. Fantastic movie.
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Frequent Contributor
PeterP
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

It is odd what we sometime remember (or do not) years later about a film (or a book, for that matter). I read the book for the first time a “long time ago” and also saw the film a “long time ago”. But I just saw the film again, quite recently, almost by chance. I must have first read the book and seen the film, on the initial occasion, at enough of a remove from one another that they were completely distinct in my mind. Recently, when I tried to recall the film, not much came back to me aside from the music! I remembered the harpsichord. It may have been the first time I had heard harpsichord. I’m not sure I even knew what one was at the time. Now, and for some years past, I have listened to and loved a great deal of keyboard music on the harpsichord. But now I have to say, seeing the film recently, I was rather disappointed in the music – there was the “harpsichord” but the whole score was really faux-baroque (as rjpdigiacomo nicely put it) – and not very idiomatic – less baroque really and more English Music Hall. (Please correct me if I am unfair to English Music Hall Music or the film!).
But to compare the book and the film – that seems difficult. My impression of the film, in my recent viewing, was not as favorable as I remember (dimly). The film did not really seem to capture the spirit of the book – but, of course, I had just re-read the book! Not that the film isn’t wonderful in many ways but it may be asking too much of any film to really capture the feeling of the book. The film does capture something of the picaresque bawdy 18th century extravagance of what, Doris Lessing, brought to us by Choisya, calls “robust unhypocritical savagery” but not so much what Lessing points out exist “side by side” in the book “with people lecturing others on morality”.

And speaking of the harpsichord…Squire Weston always wants his daughter (we will be speaking of them!) to play the harpsichord as he drinks away the evening – but he doesn’t like Handel! So I recommend Handel’s Harpsichord Suites – there are a number of different recordings in print.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

My Wordsworth edition of TJ was published in 1992 and the blurb on the back says the Lessing quote was 'recent'.



PeterP wrote:
Greetings Everyone!

To speak to your question, Choisya, all the editions I mentioned are unabridged. I don't even know, specifically, of any abridged editions, though I'm sure they must exist - but who knows? - there may even be a comic book version! What a world.

That is a wonderful quote from Doris Lessing. When did she write (say) that? Is it recent?

Message Edited by PeterP on 08-07-2007 11:49 AM

Message Edited by PeterP on 08-07-2007 11:50 AM


New User
DavidScott
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Greetings. My name is David. I enjoy reading literature from this time period. Yet, I have not read Tom Jones before. Additionally, this is the first I've ever participated in an online book discussion.
I'm looking forward to reading what you all have to say.
ALK
Contributor
ALK
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

Hi--
I'm a harried senior citizen from Upstate New York. I tried to participate in the Moby-Dick discussion but started way too late and got too involved in reading all the fascinating comments to keep up. Maybe I can keep to a schedule of two books a week in Tom Jones.

I must not have actually read Tom Jones but very vividly remember the movie, especially the eating scene and the quiet morning view of the Allworthy manor when the sky is split with the discovery of Tom laying in Mr. Allworthy's bed.

I do not have a coherent view of the 18th century in England (except of course the multiple and confused Georges and that nation's deplorable dealings with us poor colonists) and maybe reading this book will improve my knowledge.

Hi Choisya, great to "hear" your "voice" again. I loved reading your comments in Moby-Dick.

ALK
Contributor
rdm68
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves!

I saw the film again maybe 3 or 4 years ago, and I too was a little disappointed: it wasn't as good as I remembered it having been when it was first released. It was enjoyable enough, on its own terms. It certainly didn't capture the book, although I'm not sure a film can - or has any obligtaion to - capture a book on which it's based. Film is such a different medium, and does different things from what books do. Just as an opera, say, or a ballet based on a literary source is going to provide a very different experience from the original. It's more an interpretation of the book, or a set of variations on its themes, or a reimagining of the original source.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves! : BBC Tom Jones

[ Edited ]
I recently hired the DVDs of the BBC 1997 production which is really excellent and IMO much better than the film. I think it kept to the book more faithfully. A reviewer reported 'Its on Region 2 DVD at last!' - presumably that is USA? Another wrote:-

'This is a spirited and magnificent adaptation of this early English novel. Unusually we actually have the Narrator, in the guise of John Sessions, seamlessly intruding into the action, (and having his wig pinched by our hero on one occasion). Max Beesley is Tom Jones, Samantha Morton is Sophie. Definitely one to have next to your Firth-Ehle Pride & Prejudice. Magnificently cast with everyone giving their all. BBC Drama at its absolute best.'








rdm68 wrote:
I saw the film again maybe 3 or 4 years ago, and I too was a little disappointed: it wasn't as good as I remembered it having been when it was first released. It was enjoyable enough, on its own terms. It certainly didn't capture the book, although I'm not sure a film can - or has any obligtaion to - capture a book on which it's based. Film is such a different medium, and does different things from what books do. Just as an opera, say, or a ballet based on a literary source is going to provide a very different experience from the original. It's more an interpretation of the book, or a set of variations on its themes, or a reimagining of the original source.



Message Edited by Choisya on 08-12-2007 06:43 AM
Frequent Contributor
PeterP
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourselves! : BBC Tom Jones

[ Edited ]
Ah, I have never seen it. I will have order it and watch it on your recommendation. How long is it?

Message Edited by PeterP on 08-13-2007 11:45 AM
Users Online
Currently online: 4 members 516 guests
Recent logins:
Please welcome our newest community members: