Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
CLForrest
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎07-11-2011

Dante's Divine COmedy

So I've been reading Dante's divine comedy now for a little while, and have made my way through the pages of burning hell and am now finding myself in Purgatorio.  What do you guys think of his comedy?

In each and every seedling, a strong and healthy tree waits for its time to grow.
Scribe
Mountain_Muse
Posts: 1,104
Registered: ‎06-09-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Dante's Divine COmedy


CLForrest wrote:

So I've been reading Dante's divine comedy now for a little while, and have made my way through the pages of burning hell and am now finding myself in Purgatorio.  What do you guys think of his comedy?


I have not read this book from cover-to-cover since college, but the entire work still stays with me and is on my "list".  

Why have you chose to read it?

Purgatorio was my favorite part of the work..

Mtn Muse

 

A really good book is much like an artichoke. As you peel back each page of the of the book, you get closer and closer to the succulent heart of the story.
Frequent Contributor
CLForrest
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎07-11-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Dante's Divine COmedy

I think the reason I decided to read this comedy was because of the fact that I myself am looking into writing an epic poem.  Reading this comedy, and coupling it with Homer's Iliad and Odyssey has given me a lot a insight.  Also, they are just fun reads.  I think my favorite so far has been Purgatorio as well.  I haven't made it to Paradiso yet though, I'm getting there slowly.  The way everything is worded gets my brain into an uproar sometimes. Haha

In each and every seedling, a strong and healthy tree waits for its time to grow.
Contributor
Earth72
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Dante's Divine COmedy

I read my way through Dante's Inferno but have not made it through the rest of the poem. I am a casual reader so symbolism, etc is not something that I go out of my way to examine. What I took away from the hours of reading was a understanding, or at least feeling, of what society was in Dante's time. I think that is what makes a good classic, epic, or Pulitzer-level writing. The writer takes time to delve into his/her culture and capture it so well that 2,000 years later the reader can read it like a current event.

"He's the idealist, he's the dreamer of a beautiful dream, and even if the dream doesn't come true, it's rather thrilling to have dreamt it" - W. Somerset Maugham
Contributor
Stacia
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎12-30-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Dante's Divine COmedy

I'm loving this thread! I studied Classics and Medieval and Renaissance Italian in college, so anything like this gets me very excited! My personal favorite portion of La Divina Commedia is the Inferno, because I feel the emotions of the various people he encounters evoke very vivid pictures in your mind. Also, I love much of the artwork that has been done based on the stories of the Inferno. What has been your favorite story/character so far? And I think that's fantastic that you're planning on writing an epic poem! That's an excellent style of writing that you don't see any more (or at least, I haven't). What is your story going to be about?

"These are not books, lumps of lifeless paper, but minds alive on the shelves."
-Gilbert Highet

"The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid."
-Jane Austen

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Dante's Divine Comedy

[ Edited ]

CLForrest wrote:

I think the reason I decided to read this comedy was because of the fact that I myself am looking into writing an epic poem.  Reading this comedy, and coupling it with Homer's Iliad and Odyssey has given me a lot a insight.  Also, they are just fun reads.  I think my favorite so far has been Purgatorio as well.  I haven't made it to Paradiso yet though, I'm getting there slowly.  The way everything is worded gets my brain into an uproar sometimes. Haha


You may be interested in the posts on Dante here:

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Epics-Etc/bd-p/U1001/page/4



Laurel did her usual strong job of leading the discussion at that time.  I didn't succeed in staying with it all the way to the end.  But, there are good links in here to some wonderful unline sources -- the one I particularly remember is the one at Princeton largely driven by the translators Jean and Robert Hollander.

 

(I believe the very first discussion on the Epics board is of that great English epic, Paradise Lost, which is far from a favorite of mine!)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy