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Contributor
Sandy-Welch
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎12-09-2009
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Re: Question for Sandy Welch


millernumber1 wrote:

 

Though I am curious - what inspired the meeting on horseback between Emma and the as-yet-unknown Frank?  It was quite a nice scene, but it surprised me!

 

Hello again millernumber1,

 

In the book, Mr Weston says he will at last  bring Frank to see Emma at Hartfield at a specific time..Emma has been occupied,  then suddenly realises that the hour he mentioned has arrived..she goes downstairs to see Frank for the first time..although this is quite charming, it is a difficult moment to convey dramatically and to be honest we really wanted Frank to appear a little earlier, if possible,..so I took the liberty of including this scene..I did make sure that he arrived in town after Jane , as I think Austen means us to think that he has followed Jane to Highbury, indeed I think she means us to think this is the only reason he has finally decided to visit his father..as the book states that he is constantly saying he is coming and then stopped by his aunt I didn't think this was too much of a liberty..it then gives an extra frisson to their meeting and establishes them as 'co conspirators' in a way something I don't think out of character for Frank...I also like the scene , especially the bluebells..!!

 

Thanks very much for your comments and questions, it's been a really entertaining week.

 

Best Wishes

Sandy

 

 

 


 

New User
cynsoria
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎02-03-2010
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Re: Question for Sandy Welch

Ms. Welch, thank you very much for answering my questions.


On the matter of Emma and London, thanks for your direct reply.

 

Regarding the script, it is a pity it will not be available.

New User
bonnet-fan
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎04-02-2009
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Re: EMMA: Guest Screenwriter Sandy Welch (2/1 - 2/5/10)

Ms. Welch,

 

I want to thank you for your brilliant contribution of EMMA.  Thank goodness there are those of you that would add charm and pleasure to the lives of so many.  You are truly talented...

 

I don't really have any questions for you, but I have enjoyed reading all your comments.

 

I am so grateful for your adaptations, they are among my favorites! 

Contributor
Sandy-Welch
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎12-09-2009
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Re: EMMA: Guest Screenwriter Sandy Welch (2/1 - 2/5/10)


ha_segal wrote:

 

 




PLEASE IGNORE IF THERE ARE OTHER QUESTIONS OR NO TIME:

I wish there were a video interview with you, as they did with Andrew Davies. The interviewer asked Davies what his favorite scene was from his adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, and I still remember his answer. Do you have a favorite scene that you dramatized and then seeing it on screen, breathed a sigh of contentment or gratified surprise?

I'm fortunate to have been very happy with 90% of the way my work's been realised..so there are quite a few scenes I'm happy with..if I have to pick one it would be what we called the 'fireplace' scene in Our Mutual Friend..Lizzie Hexham's brother Charley has brought his friend and mentor Bradley Headstone to confront the lawyer Eugene Wrayburn at his chambers ..Charley confronts Eugene, revealing to his friend and colleague Mortimer Lightwood, that Eugene has been funding reading lessons for Lizzie..he flies into a childish rage...all the while Eugene is staring at Headstone, knowing that he is his real adversary, taking him on while the young boy exposes his callousness and selfish disregard for his sister's welfare...Headstone tells Charley to leave..leaving him  with Eugene who brings all his superiority to bear with a blithe and casual arrogance, dismissing the schoolmaster's claims to protect Lizzie..all the while Mortimer is looking on, aghast at how far Eugene has become attached to Lizzie, and his deliberate provocation of Headstone's growing frustration and rage. It is a wonderful 'scene' in the book, where Dickens creates this menacing and sulphorous atmosphere, combining combustible characters and pivoting the storytelling towards a  murderous spiral...

 

Best Wishes and thanks again for your interesting questions..

Sandy

 


 

Contributor
Sandy-Welch
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎12-09-2009
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Re: Question for Sandy Welch -- compassionate portrayal of orphans onscreen


ConnieK wrote:

 

"Sunny" London?  Ha.  It happens to be a sunny morning here in upstate New York right now, but I don't have to "fear" that it will last long.  :smileyhappy:  I just thought if we knew your time zone, people could time their questions knowing our hours are different.  It hasn't seemed at all as though you were taking too long to answer.  We're enjoying the conversation very much!

 

Hi ConnieK

 

I've just dropped in again on (sadly unsunny ) Saturday morning, as I'm ahead of you in time, to make sure no one had posted anything last night..

 

I hope I've caught all the questions but I know there are a few people, like Basson-Mommy12, MissJoMay and bonnet-fan who have been kind enough to leave messages with no questions attached and I wanted to thank them and all your other contributors for a really enjoyable and stimulating week..

 

I hope you all enjoy Episode 4 tomorrow..

 

Thanks so much for your hospitality, I've had a really good time..

 

Best Wishes

Sandy

 

 


 

Contributor
ha_segal
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎02-01-2010
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Re: EMMA: Guest Screenwriter Sandy Welch (2/1 - 2/5/10)

 


I'm fortunate to have been very happy with 90% of the way my work's been realised..so there are quite a few scenes I'm happy with..if I have to pick one it would be what we called the 'fireplace' scene in Our Mutual Friend..Lizzie Hexham's brother Charley has brought his friend and mentor Bradley Headstone to confront the lawyer Eugene Wrayburn at his chambers ..Charley confronts Eugene, revealing to his friend and colleague Mortimer Lightwood, that Eugene has been funding reading lessons for Lizzie..he flies into a childish rage...all the while Eugene is staring at Headstone, knowing that he is his real adversary, taking him on while the young boy exposes his callousness and selfish disregard for his sister's welfare...Headstone tells Charley to leave..leaving him  with Eugene who brings all his superiority to bear with a blithe and casual arrogance, dismissing the schoolmaster's claims to protect Lizzie..all the while Mortimer is looking on, aghast at how far Eugene has become attached to Lizzie, and his deliberate provocation of Headstone's growing frustration and rage. It is a wonderful 'scene' in the book, where Dickens creates this menacing and sulphorous atmosphere, combining combustible characters and pivoting the storytelling towards a  murderous spiral...

 

Best Wishes and thanks again for your interesting questions..

Sandy

 


Thanks, Sandy Welch! I remember the scene well and love your description of it! Another great dynamic about your work is that it inspires one to go back and read again…

I may have missed you, but just wanted to say MANY MANY THANKS...

God bless, Heidi


 

 

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Question for Sandy Welch -- compassionate portrayal of orphans onscreen


Sandy-Welch wrote:

 

I've just dropped in again on (sadly unsunny ) Saturday morning, as I'm ahead of you in time, to make sure no one had posted anything last night..

 

I hope I've caught all the questions but I know there are a few people, like Basson-Mommy12, MissJoMay and bonnet-fan who have been kind enough to leave messages with no questions attached and I wanted to thank them and all your other contributors for a really enjoyable and stimulating week..

 

I hope you all enjoy Episode 4 tomorrow..

 

Thanks so much for your hospitality, I've had a really good time..

 

Best Wishes

Sandy

 

 


Thank you to Sandy Welch for joining us this week in Classics.  I know we all appreciate the time and effort she took in her responses to our questions.

 

Thanks for popping in again Saturday to catch any "leftover" questions--that was very thoughtful of you!

 

We look forward to watching the rest of your interpretation of EMMA on our public broadcasting TV stations here this weekend.

 

Thanks again for participating!

 

 

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Contributor
MissJoMay
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎04-25-2009
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Thanks!

Ms. Welch-

 

I know your time here with us is already over, but I wanted to say thanks for all your answers.  I also wanted to thank you for the lovely adaptation of Emma and the wonderful adaptation of Our Mutual Friend.  It is one of my favorite Dickens novels, and I love your adaptation of it!

Jo
"I cannot live without books." -- Thomas Jefferson
bookreadingbookworm.blogspot.com
New User
emmafan
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-08-2010
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Re: EMMA: Guest Screenwriter Sandy Welch (2/1 - 2/5/10)

I want to say thank you for Emma it was the best yet and I have seen them all.I will watch it again and again. Do you think you could do Pride and Prejudice?

New User
Pybarra
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-09-2010
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How to?

 

Thank you so much for your adaptation of _Emma_!  I thoroughly enjoyed it!

 

I am a professor of Mexican American literature at the university level, and I have an idea for a possible Masterpiece adaptation.  How would I go about submitting a manuscript, or even an idea for one, to Masterpiece Theatre.  I know this would involve a lot of work and effort, but I really think my idea fits the genre.  It would be wonderful to bring this novel to the screen and therefore to a much wider audience!  My students always love the novel and they agree that it would make a great film or minseries.

 

Thank you so much for any advice!